Modern Recordings (Loudness) damage headphones/speakers?
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mibutenma

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A lot of modern recordings have dynamic range compression and peak near 0 digital decibels.
Is it possible for these to do damage to headphones and speakers?
Because of the endless loud peaks?
 
I would think if you listen to it really loud yes even very dynamic stuff can damage it.
But a normal moderate listening level I would think it wouldn't damage anything it's just squashed the dynamics and robbed the listener of using the volume knob.
 
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LFF

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Quote:
A lot of modern recordings have dynamic range compression and peak near 0 digital decibels.
Is it possible for these to do damage to headphones and speakers?
Because of the endless loud peaks?
 
I would think if you listen to it really loud yes even very dynamic stuff can damage it.
But a normal moderate listening level I would think it wouldn't damage anything it's just squashed the dynamics and robbed the listener of using the volume knob.
 
Thoughts?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


The problem isn't the peaks hitting "0 digital decibels"...it's the entire wave form hitting the same level but that's mainly a mastering problem.
 
Yes, it is possible to blow your headphones and speakers with a loud master if your volume is set too high. Hence, I recommend always lowering your volume when you are done playing something new. Always check that your volume is all the way down before playing something. Even a dynamic master will blow your equipment if your volume is too high.
 
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