METAL MAGIC RESEARCH (Thoughts and impressions)
Nov 24, 2019 at 4:06 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 832

MrLocoLuciano

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I found out a few weaks ago that Joseph Mou from Jomo Audio was launching a new brand.
It was launched at the CanJam Shangai but I did not see any return in english.

For now, MMR is offering 4 different models, all infos come from the website.

Official Website : https://metalmagic.co/



Gáe Bolg

'Gáe Bolg' is engineered with linear acoustics in mind. Delivering incredibly immersive sound and beautiful spatial imaging. It presents an impeccable intimate presentation that's is incomparable invigorating. 'Gáe Bolg' features a bespoke vented mid BA that allows for an alluring mid-range vocals to flow through seamlessly while reinforced with a high speed tweeter to smoothen highs frequency and a XL low driver to spur on the level of energy. Housed within a MMR specialty Titanium shell for UIEM or high precision 3D printed acrylic shell for CIEM, the monitor is offers perfect ergonomics that is befitting of daily and professional usage. This IEM is one of the finest picks for single / dual instrumentalists, vocalist, engineers and audiophiles.



Specifications
- 5 Precision Built Balanced Armatures
- 1 Tweeter , 1 Vented Mid-High , 2 Mids , 1 XL Low
- 4 - Way Passive Electro Frequency Division
- TriBore Waveguide

Frequency Response : 20Hz - 40kHz
Impedance : 20ohm
Noise Isolation : -26db (CIEM) / -18db (UIEM)

Retail Price : $1199


Balmung

'Balmung' is engineered with large spatial details and critical listening in mind. Delivering unmatched clarity and unparalleled resolution, the 'Balmung' is akin to the observance of a performance in the prime seat. Like it's predecessor, the "Flamenco", it's brimming with energetic bursts and incredibly immersive. 'Balmung' features a calculated balanced dispersion of 11 drivers ; Wherein it allows for a technical separation of lows for impact , speed and resolution while keeping the mids highs extremely sensitive to details. Housed within a MMR specialty Titanium shell for UIEM or high precision 3D printed acrylic shell for CIEM, the monitor is offers perfect ergonomics that is befitting of daily and professional usage. This IEM is starred recommendation for mixing, multiple instrumentalist, concerts, mastering engineers, monitoring and discerning audiophiles.



Specifications
- 11 Precision Built Balanced Armatures
- 2 Tweeters , 2 High , 4 Mids , 2 Lows, 1 XL Low
- 5 - Way Passive Electro Frequency Division
- TriBore Waveguide

Frequency Response : 20Hz - 40kHz
Impedance : 18ohm
Noise Isolation : -26db (CIEM) / -18db (UIEM)

Retail Price : $2699



Homunculus

'Homunculus' is engineered with the perfect female vocals, realistic portrayal of unplugged and live acoustics. It's built with an extremely high efficiency configuration coupled with the newest components in the industry. 'Homunculus' features a customized Foster dynamic driver which solved vibrational distortions while replicating cinematic bass response. It uses bespoke vented mid BA to texturised vocals and added a tinge of emotions while reducing e-stats inefficiency with a dual electrostatics set-up. MMR team behind 'Homunculus' added on Eletech's proprietary internal LITZ wires as final touches to perfect the IEM.Housed within a MMR specialty Titanium shell for UIEM, the monitor is offers perfect ergonomics that is befitting of daily usage.





Specifications
- 4 Triple Hybrid Drivers Configuration
- Dual Electrostatics , 1 Vented Mid , 1 Foster Dynamic Driver
- 3 - Way Passive Electro Frequency Division
- TriBore Waveguide - Eletech Proprietary Internal Litz

Frequency Response : 10Hz - 80kHz
Impedance : 35ohm
Noise Isolation : -18db (UIEM)

Retail Price : $1699



Thummim

'Thummim' is most significantly exemplified by an inconceivable spherical soundscape offering texture and details with distinct wideness, abysmal depth and soaring height. It's a MMR prized design befitting of a modern world audiophile flagship status and a showcase of MMR's top notch technology. 'Thummim' artisanal usage of 4 electrostatics that's conjoined within a single trans allows the flawless oeuvre of musical masterpieces to come alive. MMR team behind 'Thummim' added on Eletech's proprietary internal LITZ wires as final touches to perfect the IEM.Housed within a MMR specialty Titanium shell for UIEM, the monitor offers perfect ergonomics that is befitting of daily usage.





Specifications
- 9 Triple Hybrid Drivers Configuration
- 4 Electrostatics , 2 Mid , 2 Highs , 1 Foster Dynamic Driver
- 4 - Way Passive Electro Frequency Division
- TriBore Waveguide
- Eletech Proprietary Internal Litz

Frequency Response : 10Hz - 80kHz
Impedance : 35ohm
Noise Isolation : -18db (UIEM)

Retail Price : $4299

Additional information coming from discussion with Joseph, as I'm a happy owner of Trinity SS :

- Internal parts are all mounted on 3D printed chassis with all sound wave guide printed in one piece -> improves accuracy and stability of sound and overall performance
- better Dynamic driver from Foster Electric in Japan
- latest Estat driver and new high efficiency transformer from Sonion (different from trinity one)
- high purity pure silver internal wiring and special solder from Eletech
- new 0.78mm 2 pins socket with internal spring structure that improves life time and "plug and pull" life cycle (should not loosen easely)
...


If you were able to put an ear on thoose babies, please tell the community !
 
Last edited:
Nov 26, 2019 at 3:54 AM Post #5 of 832

MrLocoLuciano

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Ok I would have bought this if they didn't make it looks like there's a spaceship trying to land on your ears.
Design does not bother me from what I can see so far. Fit will be the great question and what I'm willing to read feedback on, with sound of course.
 
Nov 27, 2019 at 10:50 AM Post #7 of 832

Wyville

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Is Jomo no mo? Why the switch to MMR?
I am pretty sure Jomo is still going strong. I don't know any details on MMR as such, but from the little I have picked up it might simply be that these are aimed at a different market. Jomo is pretty global (Joseph once told me they were very popular in France) and MMR might be aimed more specifically at Asia.
 
Nov 27, 2019 at 6:36 PM Post #8 of 832

MrLocoLuciano

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Is Jomo no mo? Why the switch to MMR?
Jomo is not finished for sure. Joseph wanted to work with largeur perspective and wider support than Singapour, so MMR was born.

Flamenco is highly praised in France, i can confirm !
 
Dec 2, 2019 at 6:27 AM Post #10 of 832

Deezel177

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Hey folks! This past weekend, I was fortunate enough to attend the Portable Audio Party in Jakarta, Indonesia, where I got to try MMR’s brand-new IEMs, along with a slew of other headphones, cables and in-ears. As I said on the Eletech discussion thread, I was elated to see a CanJam-like turn out at a show held in my hometown, and I was equally delighted to see some old faces there as well. Eric Chong was exhibiting right next to MMR with Eletech, and - of course - Joseph Mou was a trooper behind the MMR booth. As always, I had as great a time listening to their products as I did catching up with them. But, without further ado, here are my impressions of MMR’s line of in-ear monitors:

74920837_436194703645939_6734225181569012145_n.jpg
Image courtesy of MMR's Instagram page

Firstly, I was extremely impressed by how well-built and clean they looked. To my eyes, they showed no signs of 3D-printing whatsoever, and the transparent shells were some of the most pristine I’d ever seen. Joseph showed me his custom MMR IEM, which looked stunning. I was unfortunately unable to grab picture of it, but again, it was one of the cleanest-looking in-ears I’d seen in recent memory. Joseph attributes the clarity of the shells to the clear silicone filling, and I’m sure that has an impact sonically as well.

The metal universals were show-stopping too. Fit-wise, the Thummim certainly matched my ears better than the Homunculus did. The latter had a shallow fit, which my ears tend to not like. I had to adjust them quite regularly. And, I wasn’t too big a fan of the shells’ sharper edges also. But, once I did get a good seal, they did sit quite comfortably in the ear, as long as my ears weren’t rubbing against the shells’ sharp points. So, if in your experience, you tend to not enjoy shallower fits, I would advise against the Homunculus. But, obviously, the reverse is true if you tend to find shallower fits more comfy. I had far better luck with the Thummim. Its deeper nozzle allowed me to achieve an instant seal. And, it sat outside the ear enough such that my skin never made contact with the shells’ edges.

Worth noting are also the Homunculus and Thummim's carrying cases with the alchemy-style artwork. They were made of leather and looked absolutely gorgeous. The Homunculus had more of a cube-like shape, while the Thummim's is the cylindrical one. As I've always said, I think products at this price range deserve a complete supporting case to go with them, and I think MMR have gone above and beyond here; marvellous work. And, finally, all the in-ears bar the Gae Bolg come default with Eletech cables as well, complete with MMR-branded hardware.

75426254_414411159467507_7915304595049737990_n.jpg
Image courtesy of MMR's Instagram page

Gae Bolg: The Gae Bolg was articulate and vibrant with an upper-midrange emphasis, highlighting vocals and lead instruments with a bright, energetic timbre. The highs complemented that presence with clarity, while the lows largely stepped out of the way to provide air and headroom for that midrange. It’s certainly a specialist IEM ideal for intimate, acoustic music. Busier genres tended to sound a bit full, and contrast-reliant instruments (like drums or 808 beats) sorta lacked lacked dynamism and impact. So, the Gae Bolg is a fine option if your ideal signature is one that’s forwardly, saturated, intimate and bright. While I wasn’t particularly struck by its tone or technique to be completely frank, maybe it’s something one of you guys will find yourselves enjoying.

Balmung: Wow, talk about a shift in tone. Among all the headphone and in-ears I auditioned at the show, the Balmung ended up becoming my favourite, largely because of its fabulously-coloured tuning and how brilliantly said tuning was executed. In short, the Balmung sounded really gutsy and muscular; the product of an elevated upper-bass/lower-midrange around 500Hz that gave me flashbacks to JH Audio’s Diana IEMs. Instruments sounded bold, gruff and ballsy, and they had wonderful impact as well. Tom toms and bass guitars were let loose with stunning musicality. But, they weren’t wild either. Thanks to the in-ear’s top-end extension, all that weight and body still came across controlled and authoritative.

Nowhere was the Balmung bloomy, which is a testament to how well everything around that 500Hz bump was set-up. The mid- and sub-bass gave that region room, but they weren’t learn or missing either. The upper-mids let the lower-mids steal the show, but they had enough presence to not sound diffuse. And, the highs had just enough sparkle to cut through the bump without pulling the listener’s focus. The result is a heavy, gutsy, analog-sounding response that still came across balanced because of its support system. The Balmung I think is a great testament that not all signatures have to be defined by treble sparkle to sound appealing or lively, and it’s a showcase of Joseph Mou’s ability in making a distinctly-coloured in-ear still sound even-handed, coherent and versatile. Bravo.

74674701_1014428778903371_7223459918308180733_n.jpg
Image courtesy of MMR's Instagram page
Homunculus: The Homunculus had a reverse-L-shaped response, emphasising the mid-to-high regions over the low-end. Its overall timbre was airy, light and delicate; clean and articulate. Thankfully, the top-end wasn’t overdone to my ears. The electrostats remained smooth, refined and silky. So, that light, nimble tone didn’t have any brittleness or stridence with it. Rather, what it had was tons of openness and headroom, and an effortless delivery of detail. The stage was vast and clean as well, which made live performances and classical music an absolute joy to listen to.

As you could probably surmise by now, the Homunculus won’t be for you if you like a lot of low-end presence. While the Foster dynamic driver did show in the low-end’s physicality and texture, it didn’t ever inch forward, really, in terms of quantity. Like the mids and highs, it had a brighter tone to it as well, with kick drums that had more thwack than thump. It’s a bass that was more airy and clean than it was full-bodied or guttural. But, again, it still had that DD-esque texture and solidity; it’s just that there wasn’t too much of it. The Homunculus is a great pick if you’re into classical or acoustic genres, or you simply like spaciousness in general.

Thummim: The Thummim had a more mainstream, all-rounded signature. It had a clean, vibrant and engaging response not unlike Jomo Audio’s similarly-configured Trinity - which I brought to the event to compare against - but they share differences as well. The Thummim’s w-shape was more subtle than the Trinity’s, which gave it a more linear, coherent-sounding response. It wasn’t unlike 64 Audio’s A18t in tone, for example. The Thummim also had greater midrange presence; the low-mids, especially. Its low-end wasn’t as full-sounding and decadent as the Trinity’s, opting instead for a tighter, cleaner response that still had a good amount of warmth emanating from it. But, its sub-bass was lovely, giving the in-ear drive without overshadowing the midrange.

Finally, up high, the Thummim had a more refined and effortless treble than the Trinity, whilst sporting the same level of clarity and detail retrieval. While the latter’s low-treble was a tad rough around the edges for me, the Thummim came across more elegant, dainty and airy. Spatially, it was a toss-up between the two, but I felt the Thummim’s more effortless top-end gave its image more stability. And, its background was remarkably clean as well; about as clean as the Homunculus’d even with the Thummim’s relatively fuller lows and low-mids. All in all, I adored the Thummim, which had the dynamic range and presence of a Trinity or A18t, but with subtlety, elegance and finesse to its delivery as well; a likeable-sounding IEM that knew when it was appropriate to restrain itself, so those instances of energy really counted.

74634307_160398982021761_8244850550206582515_n.jpg
Image courtesy of MMR's Instagram page
 
Last edited:
Dec 2, 2019 at 11:31 AM Post #11 of 832

MrLocoLuciano

500+ Head-Fier
Joined
Sep 4, 2016
Posts
724
Likes
1,110
Location
Vienne - France
Hey folks! This past weekend, I was fortunate enough to attend the Portable Audio Party in Jakarta, Indonesia, where I got to try MMR’s brand-new IEMs, along with a slew of other headphones, cables and in-ears. As I said on the Eletech discussion thread, I was elated to see a CanJam-like turn out at a show held in my hometown, and I was equally delighted to see some old faces there as well. Eric Chong was exhibiting right next to MMR with Eletech, and - of course - Joseph Mou was a trooper behind the MMR booth. As always, I had as great a time listening to their products as I did catching up with them. But, without further ado, here are my impressions of MMR’s line of in-ear monitors:


Image courtesy of MMR's Instagram page

Firstly, I was extremely impressed by how well-built and clean they looked. To my eyes, they showed no signs of 3D-printing whatsoever, and the transparent shells were some of the most pristine I’d ever seen. Joseph showed me his custom MMR IEM, which looked stunning. I was unfortunately unable to grab picture of it, but again, it was one of the cleanest-looking in-ears I’d seen in recent memory. Joseph attributes the clarity of the shells to the clear silicone filling, and I’m sure that has an impact sonically as well.

The metal universals were show-stopping too. Fit-wise, the Thummim certainly matched my ears better than the Homunculus did. The latter had a shallow fit, which my ears tend to not like. I had to adjust them quite regularly. And, I wasn’t too big a fan of the shells’ sharper edges also. But, once I did get a good seal, they did sit quite comfortably in the ear, as long as my ears weren’t rubbing against the shells’ sharp points. So, if in your experience, you tend to not enjoy shallower fits, I would advise against the Homunculus. But, obviously, the reverse is true if you tend to find shallower fits more comfy. I had far better luck with the Thummim. Its deeper nozzle allowed me to achieve an instant seal. And, it sat outside the ear enough such that my skin never made contact with the shells’ edges.

Worth noting are also the Homunculus and Thummim's carrying cases with the alchemy-style artwork. They were made of leather and looked absolutely gorgeous. The Homunculus had more of a cube-like shape, while the Thummim's is the cylindrical one. As I've always said, I think products at this price range deserve a complete supporting case to go with them, and I think MMR have gone above and beyond here; marvellous work. And, finally, all the in-ears bar the Gae Bolg come default with Eletech cables as well, complete with MMR-branded hardware.


Image courtesy of MMR's Instagram page

Gae Bolg: The Gae Bolg was articulate and vibrant with an upper-midrange emphasis, highlighting vocals and lead instruments with a bright, energetic timbre. The highs complemented that presence with clarity, while the lows largely stepped out of the way to provide air and headroom for that midrange. It’s certainly a specialist IEM ideal for intimate, acoustic music. Busier genres tended to sound a bit full, and contrast-reliant instruments (like drums or 808 beats) sorta lacked lacked dynamism and impact. So, the Gae Bolg is a fine option if your ideal signature is one that’s forwardly, saturated, intimate and bright. While I wasn’t particularly struck by its tone or technique to be completely frank, maybe it’s something one of you guys will find yourselves enjoying.

Balmung: Wow, talk about a shift in tone. Among all the headphone and in-ears I auditioned at the show, the Balmung ended up becoming my favourite, largely because of its fabulously-coloured tuning and how brilliantly said tuning was executed. In short, the Balmung sounded really gutsy and muscular; the product of an elevated upper-bass/lower-midrange around 500Hz that gave me flashbacks to JH Audio’s Diana IEMs. Instruments sounded bold, gruff and ballsy, and they had wonderful impact as well. Tom toms and bass guitars were let loose with stunning musicality. But, they weren’t wild either. Thanks to the in-ear’s top-end extension, all that weight and body still came across controlled and authoritative.

Nowhere was the Balmung bloomy, which is a testament to how well everything around that 500Hz bump was set-up. The mid- and sub-bass gave that region room, but they weren’t learn or missing either. The upper-mids let the lower-mids steal the show, but they had enough presence to not sound diffuse. And, the highs had just enough sparkle to cut through the bump without pulling the listener’s focus. The result is a heavy, gutsy, analog-sounding response that still came across balanced because of its support system. The Balmung I think is a great testament that not all signatures have to be defined by treble sparkle to sound appealing or lively, and it’s a showcase of Joseph Mou’s ability in making a distinctly-coloured in-ear still sound even-handed, coherent and versatile. Bravo.


Image courtesy of MMR's Instagram page
Homunculus: The Homunculus had a reverse-L-shaped response, emphasising the mid-to-high regions over the low-end. Its overall timbre was airy, light and delicate; clean and articulate. Thankfully, the top-end wasn’t overdone to my ears. The electrostats remained smooth, refined and silky. So, that light, nimble tone didn’t have any brittleness or stridence with it. Rather, what it had was tons of openness and headroom, and an effortless delivery of detail. The stage was vast and clean as well, which made live performances and classical music an absolute joy to listen to.

As you could probably surmise by now, the Homunculus won’t be for you if you like a lot of low-end presence. While the Foster dynamic driver did show in the low-end’s physicality and texture, it didn’t ever inch forward, really, in terms of quantity. Like the mids and highs, it had a brighter tone to it as well, with kick drums that had more thwack than thump. It’s a bass that was more airy and clean than it was full-bodied or guttural. But, again, it still had that DD-esque texture and solidity; it’s just that there wasn’t too much of it. The Homunculus is a great pick if you’re into classical or acoustic genres, or you simply like spaciousness in general.

Thummim: The Thummim had a more mainstream, all-rounded signature. It had a clean, vibrant and engaging response not unlike Jomo Audio’s similarly-configured Trinity - which I brought to the event to compare against - but they share differences as well. The Thummim’s w-shape was more subtle than the Trinity’s, which gave it a more linear, coherent-sounding response. It wasn’t unlike 64 Audio’s A18t in tone, for example. The Thummim also had greater midrange presence; the low-mids, especially. Its low-end wasn’t as full-sounding and decadent as the Trinity’s, opting instead for a tighter, cleaner response that still had a good amount of warmth emanating from it. But, its sub-bass was lovely, giving the in-ear drive without overshadowing the midrange.

Finally, up high, the Thummim had a more refined and effortless treble than the Trinity, whilst sporting the same level of clarity and detail retrieval. While the latter’s low-treble was a tad rough around the edges for me, the Thummim came across more elegant, dainty and airy. Spatially, it was a toss-up between the two, but I felt the Thummim’s more effortless top-end gave its image more stability. And, its background was remarkably clean as well; about as clean as the Homunculus’d even with the Thummim’s relatively fuller lows and low-mids. All in all, I adored the Thummim, which had the dynamic range and presence of a Trinity or A18t, but with subtlety, elegance and finesse to its delivery as well; a likeable-sounding IEM that knew when it was appropriate to restrain itself, so those instances of energy really counted.


Image courtesy of MMR's Instagram page
Great feedback @Deezel177 ! Real pleasure to ear such good things. Can't wait to put an ear on theese.
 

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