Mac OS X Leopard Up-to-Date Program Questions???
Oct 25, 2007 at 10:03 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 10

RYCeT

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Hi guys, as you know, I've been waiting for the new macbook to come out. I prefer Macbook since it's smaller, however I need a bigger hard drive & Ram. I've been researching that the only way to transfer the contents will be by cloning it.
Apple has been offering 'Mac OS X Leopard Up-to-Date Program'. I'm just wondering, what kind of dvd's they will provide for this program. Can I use that DVD to do fresh install? I'll prefer fresh install instead of cloning.
 
Oct 25, 2007 at 11:24 PM Post #2 of 10

Wodgy

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Quote:

Originally Posted by RYCeT /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Hi guys, as you know, I've been waiting for the new macbook to come out. I prefer Macbook since it's smaller, however I need a bigger hard drive & Ram. I've been researching that the only way to transfer the contents will be by cloning it.
Apple has been offering 'Mac OS X Leopard Up-to-Date Program'. I'm just wondering, what kind of dvd's they will provide for this program. Can I use that DVD to do fresh install? I'll prefer fresh install instead of cloning.



Your question isn't entirely clear (I don't understand your cloning comment, I think you might have misread what you were reading about that... OS X has an excellent migration tool which lets you pick exactly what you want to migrate; I can't think of any reason why you'd need to clone an OS X drive).

I'm pretty sure you'll get a standard OS X Leopard DVD with the Leopard Up-to-Date program. The only "special" DVDs Apple ships are the DVDs that come with each system and include whatever bundled software (iLife + sometimes OmniOutliner, etc.) is bundled along.

(Also, just because you get a vanilla Leopard DVD, it doesn't mean you can't use iLife, etc. from a bundled Tiger DVD. Just insert the bundled DVD and install what you want off it. You can do that without reinstalling the whole OS.)

In general, when you upgrade an Apple OS, you get three options:
1) upgrade
2) archive and install
3) erase and install.

1 and 3 are pretty obvious. 2 is kind of neat. It's like a totally fresh install, but before it starts the install, it makes backups of your home directory, the system directory, etc., then does a fresh install. Once finished, you can use the migration tool to move a selection of your old stuff over, or you can manually move stuff one-by-one. Either way, all your old stuff is still on the machine, and you have a totally fresh install. It's the best of both worlds.
 
Oct 25, 2007 at 11:37 PM Post #3 of 10

RYCeT

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Hi Wodgy, macbook came with 80gb or 120gb standard Hard Drive. I need bigger internal HD and I'll upgrade/swap it myself. From what I've read, I need to put the old HD to external enclosure and clone them into the new one inside macbook. I wondered if the update program dvd will allow me for fresh install.
 
Oct 25, 2007 at 11:43 PM Post #4 of 10

Wodgy

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Quote:

Originally Posted by RYCeT /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Hi Wodgy, macbook came with 80gb or 120gb standard Hard Drive. I need bigger internal HD and I'll upgrade/swap it myself. From what I've read, I need to put the old HD to external enclosure and clone them into the new one inside macbook. I wondered if the update program dvd will allow me for fresh install.


Yes, it will allow a fresh install. You don't need to do the clone step.

Probably the best thing to do is just order the bigger (160gb, right?) drive from NewEgg when you order the machine, then swap it in as soon as you get it, then install Leopard off the DVD that comes with your machine. If you wait a week or so, Apple will have put real Leopard DVDs in all their machines in inventory. If you do get an up-to-date DVD (e.g. if you've already ordered the machine), just swap in the new drive you buy, install Leopard fresh off the up-to-date DVD, then put the old Tiger DVD in the drive and install whatever bundled applications you want. In general OS X bundled applications are worth it; they're full versions, not trialware or shovelware or adware. (The one exception being MS Office; it only comes as a demo, for obvious reasons.)
 
Oct 27, 2007 at 4:40 AM Post #7 of 10

Wodgy

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Oct 27, 2007 at 6:08 AM Post #8 of 10

kugino

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Wodgy /img/forum/go_quote.gif
MacFixIt is generally seen as a trolling website. I wouldn't put much stock in those kind of hysterical warnings; see John Gruber's comments on this:
http://daringfireball.net/linked/2007/october#fri-26-mj



yeah, gruber took them to task...while i don't agree with everything gruber says, a lot of his mac views are pretty good. it's when he starts talking about non-mac stuff that i start questioning him.
 
Oct 27, 2007 at 5:06 PM Post #9 of 10

bigshot

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I've installed Leopard on six of my machines. No problems at all. It's a really great upgrade. Time Machine is chugging along filling up a 1 tb external drive as we speak.

See ya
Steve
 
Oct 30, 2007 at 8:23 PM Post #10 of 10

senny-ftw

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Quote:

I've installed Leopard on six of my machines.


Only six? What about the rest of them?!

I installed Leopard yesterday with the default (upgrade) options. It takes about 60 seconds to go through the installation questions, then you can just leave your computer for an hour and find it booted up in Leopard, all installed and ready to go.
 

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