Listening Fatigue with DT990/600s
Nov 17, 2011 at 1:49 PM Post #16 of 21

nikongod

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Quote:
Forgive me if I'm being a complete idiot here, but I was under the impression that the Schitt Valhalla had an output impedance of up to 600 Ohm, hence why I bought them in the first place. 
 
Also, I couldn't find anything about a ETY P-S cable on google other than them being attached to a specific brand of IEMs (Also not really much of a DYI guy yet as I work a lot with college on top of that.) What exactly do the impedance adapters you're talking about do?

 
No worries. 
Output impedance and output load are often used interchangeably which sucks because they mean totally different things.
 
Output load (which is what I assume you/they) are talking about is just that - you can use this bit of gear with headphones in this range. 
 
Output impedance is a different thing.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Output_impedance
In a nutshell, it means that the output AC voltage varies in response to the load. Since most headphones have frequency VS impedance graphs that are not flat certain areas will be bumped up a couple db, others dropped down. When you have a very low output impedance the effect where audible response follows impedance (at least somewhat) does not happen. Depending on the headphones, it may be BETTER that it does not happen! There are several standards covering how headphones should respond to amps, MFR's are free to follow any that they happen to like (different ones for different headphones even!), and never tell anyone which they follow. A little experimentation here can yield VERY nice results. 
 
The ETY P-S cable is a cable with a resistor in it. I mentioned it because this particular brand used to be very popular, but any will work. They are not hard to make yourself, and are available on Ebay too :) If you are making one, Id start with 120ohms. 
 
Nov 17, 2011 at 8:28 PM Post #17 of 21

carledwards

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Great cans with the right amplification. I love 'em, especially for rock and amplified music.
 
Nov 18, 2011 at 11:35 AM Post #18 of 21

Bazirker

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Quote:
Great cans with the right amplification. I love 'em, especially for rock and amplified music.



What would you say is the right amplification?
 
Nov 19, 2011 at 6:50 AM Post #19 of 21

duetta

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DT-990s have always had that extra bit of brightness added back to cut through the ample bass. 
 
As for the proper amplification, Jason at Schiit mentioned in an email to me that the DT-990 was one of the phones that they listened extensively to when designing the Valhalla.  But it has to be a sound you like in the first place.  I've had my DT-990 for nearly 20 years...but I strongly prefer the DT-880s that I recently purchased in most repertoire.  The Valhalla absolutely softens the edge on my DT-990 600s and DT-880 600s - but not enough to make a bright, edgy recording sound balanced.
 
The reality is that many recording engineers have no clue how badly their mixes can sound on audiophile and near-audiophile equipment. 
 
Nov 19, 2011 at 4:22 PM Post #20 of 21

Gwarmi

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Quote:
DT-990s have always had that extra bit of brightness added back to cut through the ample bass. 
 
As for the proper amplification, Jason at Schiit mentioned in an email to me that the DT-990 was one of the phones that they listened extensively to when designing the Valhalla.  But it has to be a sound you like in the first place.  I've had my DT-990 for nearly 20 years...but I strongly prefer the DT-880s that I recently purchased in most repertoire.  The Valhalla absolutely softens the edge on my DT-990 600s and DT-880 600s - but not enough to make a bright, edgy recording sound balanced.
 
The reality is that many recording engineers have no clue how badly their mixes can sound on audiophile and near-audiophile equipment. 


I think most do ~ it's just that this does little for the menacing record label board member threatening to
tear up their pay cheque if they don't play 'i-device and radio friendly' ball.
 
There was a good read around about an engineer who refused to work for the Red Hot Chili peppers anymore
after trying to find a middle ground in this madness ~ he would send them 3 final album masterings.
 
Audiophile grade, middle of the ground, LOUD compressed tripe.
 
Guess what they picked every time? Stewed tripe.
 
 
Nov 19, 2011 at 5:33 PM Post #21 of 21

WhDemon

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Quote:
Heya,
 
Take 7khz to 10khz down by 5~7dB in your equalizer.
 
The DT990's are bright, but I never had fatigue with them. But that's just my ears. I had them on a LDMKIII, Lyr, Matrix Cube, etc, and didn't notice a big difference anywhere and mine are well broken in so there's no voodoo at work. Maybe you're just sensitive to it's treble. Burn-in and tubes and all that is not going to change that. Equalization will change it. Otherwise, wrong headphone for you (luckily, it should sell nicely if you cannot return it).
 
Very best,


In bold
 
 

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