Klipsch HP-3
Jun 16, 2021 at 12:23 PM Post #482 of 485

pbui44

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Thanks. I'll keep that in mind next time I hear HP-3s. It'll happen sooner or later :)

The Klipsch Heritage HP-3 are like a cross between the Denon AH-D5000 and the Grado GS2000e. They rumble to the deepest bass root on various EDM genres, yet sparkle so generously on many rock albums. One thing that the HP-3 has over those two is the planar-like speed and attack throughout the entire soundstage. Of course, the mids-extension on the HP-3 is not as good as the GS2000e, but more neutral to the bass/treble and allows more air within the instrument separation. You would think that the HP-3 is another evolutionary culmination of the D5000 and GS2000e, but it is very much more than that. It is like Klipsch took many concepts that other speaker companies have in their sound signature, like Sonus Faber (thanks, RMAF :) ), but the concepts are even more deep-rooted...like they incorporated decades of trial-and-error into their product, like McIntosh.

What can I say? Missing those years experienced at several CanJams left me wondering where I was going with find something that brought back those memories and that is what the Klipsch Heritage HP-3 has. BTW, @xanlamin has several HP-3 models that are complete with display box for $850 shipped with paypal fees included, which is a total bargain, considering how heavy the display box is.
 
Jun 17, 2021 at 12:20 AM Post #483 of 485

theangelboy

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This might seem a out of left field and a bit disjointed, but I've been on a journey these past few days.

Because of my recent EQ success with the HP-3 and Advanced Alpha, I decided to take a crack at EQing my Nighthawk which I have always, to put simply, hated the sound of. After making a profile based of off my measurements, I found the Nighthawk driver very capable when it wasn't buried in all of the tuning weirdness, with shocking amounts of detail. It almost felt like I unburied an Ferrari in a dusty old barn, really surprised me. I then compared it EQ'd to measurements of my HP-3... and some parts of the frequency response looked similar. Did some reading on the specs and sure enough, the HP-3 and Nighthawk use a extremely similar driver. The only meaningful spec difference I could see is the HP-3 uses a 52mm and the Nighthawk uses a 50mm. And honestly, knowing how "accurate" spec sheets can be from manufacturers, it wouldn't surprise me at all if they were the exact same driver, just measuring it differently. The drivers certainly look the same to my eyes. complete with a similar metal mesh cover.

Anyhow, this got me thinking, could I mod my Nighthawk and tune it like a HP-3, or at the very least, improve the sound? So I did some experiments, some modding, and some pad rolling. Also, as an aside, even my super janky measurement rig makes these things so much easier. Don't think you need to spring for a GRAS to get a useful measurement rig for EQ and modding, I spent a total of $7 on mine and it has already saved me hours of subjective comparison hell, especially with pad rolling. I can tell at a glance what a pad does to the sound compared to stock and if it looks promising, then I spend time listening.... Anyway, back on topic.

After adding some cotton rounds behind the drivers and switching to knockoff Brainwavz microsuede oval pads (they measured slightly better than the real BW MS pads), the Nighthawk measures shocking similar to my HP-3! The frequency response is actually a dead match from 20hz-3.8khz. So little difference, in fact, that 3.8khz down looks closer than a L R measurement of the same headphone.

However, in practice, the Nighthawks don't sound the exact same as the HP-3. The treble deviates quite a bit, with the peaks/dips in different places, so the Nighthawk actually comes across brighter to my ears. Imaging and soundstage seem to be a little better on the HP-3, along with the bass sounding more "open." I suspect that has to do with the larger cup design. But I can't overstate what a HUGE improvement the sound is over the stock Nighthawk. Audioquest took such a capable driver and really bungled it. The fact that I paid $700 for my HP-3, felt like a got a good deal, and only paid $250 for my Nighthawk and have questioned that purchase until now, shows how good the driver can be when put in the right hands. Although, I can safely say AQ did a better job making it more comfortable. The Nighthawk really does float on my head, while my HP-3 before my suspension strap mod was downright painful to wear after only an hour.

Well, thanks for joining me on my journey of making a baby HP-3! Lol, hope you enjoyed my mad ramblings. :o2smile:
 
Jun 17, 2021 at 8:54 AM Post #484 of 485
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The Klipsch Heritage HP-3 are like a cross between the Denon AH-D5000 and the Grado GS2000e. They rumble to the deepest bass root on various EDM genres, yet sparkle so generously on many rock albums. One thing that the HP-3 has over those two is the planar-like speed and attack throughout the entire soundstage. Of course, the mids-extension on the HP-3 is not as good as the GS2000e, but more neutral to the bass/treble and allows more air within the instrument separation. You would think that the HP-3 is another evolutionary culmination of the D5000 and GS2000e, but it is very much more than that. It is like Klipsch took many concepts that other speaker companies have in their sound signature, like Sonus Faber (thanks, RMAF :) ), but the concepts are even more deep-rooted...like they incorporated decades of trial-and-error into their product, like McIntosh.

Thanks a lot, that's very useful. There are some Klipsch speakers I really enjoyed, and given that legacy I imagine that their cans have to be special in one way or another. :beerchug:
 
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Jun 17, 2021 at 11:39 AM Post #485 of 485

pbui44

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Thanks a lot, that's very useful. There are some Klipsch speakers I really enjoyed, and given that legacy I imagine that their cans have to be special in one way or another. :beerchug:

Now that you mentioned it from one of your previous quotes, I have been listening to death metal for a while now and not only can I understand what vocals are saying more as I listen, but the sound signature can vary by the type and quality of recording done. Some songs will allow a more recessed v-shape, while others will let the vocals become more lush and allow the death ballad take place. I first heard death metal from an old friend that was a death metal fan and when I heard it, I could not understand what the lyrics were and woke up to tinnitus the next day. None of either of those now, which makes the HP-3 even more valuable to me! :)
 

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