Keeping CDs in good condition
Jun 12, 2010 at 9:53 AM Post #2 of 25
are you talking about CD bronzing?
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD_bronzing
 
it can't be prevented.
 
if you're talking about basic wear and tear, then the 1st and foremost rule is keep them in their darn cases.  and when you take them out of players, handle them by the edges, and guess what?  put them back in their case.
not even a need to clean them or anything.
 
i've seen people stack them loosely on top of the cd player or what-not.  and that, my friend, is where the trouble starts.  nothing is good at scratching a CD like another CD. 
 
 
 
 
Jun 12, 2010 at 10:12 AM Post #3 of 25
Spoilt in what way?  Damaged from scratches and scuffs?  Damaged from deterioration during storage?
 
I've had one CD suffer from bronzing during storage.  It's due to an improper lacquer used in the manufacture of the CD.  Not much you can do about that.  I've copied that CD to a CUE file and will burn a replacement when the original becomes unreadable.
 
Some CDs appear to have some growing damage and deterioration of the reflective layer around the outside edge.  Again a defect in manufacture and improper lacquer.  I've got those saved as CUE files as well just in case.
 
A few CDs seem to have possibly growing pinholes in the reflective layer.  I don't know if the pinholes are actually getting larger with age.  It is worrisome when I see a CD like that with obvious pinholes.  The ones I've noticed have been saved to CUE files just in case.
 
For problems of scuffs and scratches just be careful during handling.  Don't store in slide-in slide-out pocket style CD holders.  Don't put them down on any hard surfaces while transferring them in and out of the CD player.
 
My CDs are now all ripped and I use the computer for primary playback.  So no need now to mess with physical CDs for regular listening.  My physical CDs are now in boxes in storage.  I still dig into the physical CDs occasionally and still bring a few selected CDs to meets and demos and such.  And I still dig in to check the cover art and booklets that come with the CDs.  I'm also in a probably never-ending process of scanning covers when I can't find good cover art online.  But other than that, the physical CDs don't get much handling now.
 
Jun 12, 2010 at 9:21 PM Post #4 of 25
Wear, tear and scratches won't be much of a problem for me, as i keep them in their cases after i rip them. Do the recently produced CDs still suffer from bronzing?
 
Jun 13, 2010 at 11:28 AM Post #5 of 25
 
Quote:
 A few CDs seem to have possibly growing pinholes in the reflective layer.

 
I've also seen pinholes but in most cases the CDs had them when I bought them as new.
 
Jun 14, 2010 at 8:47 PM Post #8 of 25


Quote:
 
 
 
Do not forget to store them in the vertical position,not flat.


To prevent warping, like vinyls?
I seriously doubt something as rigid and small as a CD would warp if kept flat. Case and point: all the CD's I have left around in their cases that are not warped even after 10 years.
 
Jun 14, 2010 at 9:05 PM Post #9 of 25


Quote:
 
 
 
Do not forget to store them in the vertical position,not flat.


So it's not a good idea to have them in 4ft high stacks? I was wondering how much higher i could go before the ones at the bottom were damaged. 
 
I really need to get rid of them, but the the prices the stores offer is a joke. I guess i'll need to rent some storage space soon. 
 
Just a thought, but if i rip the CDs and sell them, does that mean I'm short changing the recording industry?
 
Jun 15, 2010 at 12:54 AM Post #11 of 25
ya, that's supposed to be illegal.
wink.gif

 
Jun 15, 2010 at 2:04 AM Post #12 of 25


Quote:
To prevent warping, like vinyls?
I seriously doubt something as rigid and small as a CD would warp if kept flat. Case and point: all the CD's I have left around in their cases that are not warped even after 10 years.

 
The general consensus is that it is optimal to store them vertically.
 
Like cables etc there will be believers and disbelievers.

 
 
Jun 15, 2010 at 2:07 PM Post #13 of 25
Polycarbonate is pretty tough stuff.  Pull out a coaster CDR and try to break it with your bare hands.  Actually don't.  Put some thick leather gloves and safety glasses on first.  Its not gonna care which way you store it unless it gets seriously hot.  I'm thinking inside black armored Mercedes in Iraq, on the hottest day of the whole summer.  Keep them out of UV light, whether it's direct sunlight or a tanning bed and they'll be fine.
 
Any CD that's properly made will last longer than you will, so unless you're planning to pass them on to your grandchildren or something then you just need to rip them and then put them in the closet or something.
 
If you want to make sure you never lose your music collection then an offsite backup is the way to go.  First, Rip all your CDs.  Second, buy a couple (or a couple pairs if needed) of the latest and greatest hard drives and copy all you music to each one.  Third, put each hard drive in a separate, safe place.  Safe is defined as somewhere it will be fine even if thieves steal everything you own, burn your house to the ground, and then set off a tac nuke in the ashes.  Put one in a safe deposit box.  Give another to a friend who lives a good ways away.  Or put it in a pelican case and geochace it.  Be creative!  Fourth, sell all your CDs.  Fifth, every year or two go dig up your hard drives and copy all the new music you've acquired since last time to them.  Buy new ones if you need more capicity, or if it looks like the interface is going out of style.  Sixth, rehide them.  Seventh, sell all your CDs again.  Eighth, repeat as necessary.
 
Is that OCD?  Yes it is.  But I'd say no more than worrying about whether to store your CDs horizontally or vertically.  I guarantee that it will work against anything short of nuclear holocaust though.
 

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