JVC HA-RX700's; My first purchase.
Aug 27, 2010 at 6:31 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 2

TheDoctor46

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Hello everybody,
 
I've browsed your forum over the last week or so and made my first investment into the world of headphones based on the basic wisdom of these and other forums. 
 
I had an under £40 budget that led me to get the JVC HA-RX-700's to replace my terrible Logitech headset.
 
I'm really pleased with them in every way; quality of construction, performance... everything.
 
My only question is that there is a plether portion of these headphones that rotates, and there is also a thicker portion of the padding that (I presume) is designed to be positioned at the back of each ear piece. Is this the case? how is the padding supposed to be orientated otherwise?
 
You'll have to excuse my ignorance here; I understand that there are "closed" and "open" earphones in this jungle and I believe the RX700s  aren't "closed" headphones. The isolation of sound was never an issue to me but I'd love to understand the physical differences between closed and open headphones are.
 
Pre-emptive thanks.
 
Aug 28, 2010 at 4:18 AM Post #2 of 2

windyapple

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Hello!  I am new to the headphone world, as well, and after reviewing the responses to a thread I made, I made the same purchase that you did.  I just received them.  And I'm in love, can't wait to hear what they sound like after the (albeit mysterious and debated) burn in.
 
Regarding the rotating padding, I don't think there is any particular way that they are "supposed" to go.  It's not necessarily bad that they rotate, because in order to mod headphones, the padding has to come off (?), and you can put them back on.  So I don't think the rotation is going to damage anything.  Maybe you should just set them to your liking.
 
Yep, as far as my research goes, the RX-700 is open.  My understanding is that closed are designed so that there are as few physical openings as possible for the sound to escape the phone when it is on your head.  This results in a more "closed off" kind of sound, and a smaller sound stage.
 
Open phones don't have the physical design elements meant to keep sound in.  Instead, they have openings inside the phone, and the sound can escape.  Outside sounds can also come in.  Open phones usually have a larger sound stage and, to my understanding, a freer, more natural kind of sound.  Isolation is sacrificed, however.
 
I hope this answered your question!  More experienced peoples, feel free to correct or add!
 

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