Interesting Sound Illusion
Sep 10, 2009 at 11:46 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 12

talisman42

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YouTube - Amazing AUDIO illusion

This is crazy. Optical illusions I've seen, but this is a first for me
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Sep 12, 2009 at 3:39 AM Post #5 of 12

Scott549

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Clearly there is some sort of a "burn-in" effect going on. The sound coming out of my computer speakers is changing properties due to the physical makeup of the components. There is a slight change each time the video is played.
smily_headphones1.gif
 
Sep 12, 2009 at 5:23 AM Post #7 of 12

Bilavideo

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It's not a burn-in effect. It's a trick. You're not hearing a single tone. You're hearing two: a high tone and a low tone played simultaneously. Then the scale goes up one-half step.

As these two notes are an octave apart, the low tone finishes out one-half step away from where the high-tone started. When you play the recording a second time, the high tone sounds like the completed progression of the low tone. Your mind is fooled into thinking the low tone is continuing onward and upward.

What about the original high tone? It can't continue. When you start the recording over, it can't go an octave higher. Looking for it, the mind finds it repeated as the low tone. This is hardly continuous, but the mind makes the leap. Why? Because it recognizes a tonal match and it wants to continue the rhythmic pattern. And before it can recognize the mismatch, the pattern continues: two tones, one octave apart, with a rhythmic progression at one-half step higher and higher.
 
Sep 12, 2009 at 10:48 PM Post #9 of 12

talisman42

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Scott549 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Clearly there is some sort of a "burn-in" effect going on. The sound coming out of my computer speakers is changing properties due to the physical makeup of the components. There is a slight change each time the video is played.
smily_headphones1.gif



x2
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Sep 13, 2009 at 12:37 AM Post #11 of 12

Scott549

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Bilavideo /img/forum/go_quote.gif
It's not a burn-in effect. It's a trick. You're not hearing a single tone. You're hearing two: a high tone and a low tone played simultaneously. Then the scale goes up one-half step.

As these two notes are an octave apart, the low tone finishes out one-half step away from where the high-tone started. When you play the recording a second time, the high tone sounds like the completed progression of the low tone. Your mind is fooled into thinking the low tone is continuing onward and upward.

What about the original high tone? It can't continue. When you start the recording over, it can't go an octave higher. Looking for it, the mind finds it repeated as the low tone. This is hardly continuous, but the mind makes the leap. Why? Because it recognizes a tonal match and it wants to continue the rhythmic pattern. And before it can recognize the mismatch, the pattern continues: two tones, one octave apart, with a rhythmic progression at one-half step higher and higher.



Yes, I believe that is correct. Or at least it would be if it were not for the fact that my computer speakers are still burning in.
smily_headphones1.gif
 
Sep 13, 2009 at 1:25 AM Post #12 of 12

yumigator

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Pretty cool. After one replay, though, I couldn't hear it anymore, probably because I was listening too hard for it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by DeusEx /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Apparently called a Shepard tone.


I think the Shepard tone is something different.
 

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