I'm a jazz newbie and...
Feb 25, 2006 at 10:52 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 18

coffeeaddict

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Well, of the albums I've listened to:

Kind of Blue quickly became one of my favourite albums of any genre.

Bitches Brew was great.

And Sketches of Spain and A Love Supreme were good.

If the jazz experts of HeadFi would recommend something I might like, that'd be great..

If these are uninformed, offensive, ridiculous newbie opinions, then forgive me... and please recommend some more stuff like Kind of Blue anyways
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Feb 25, 2006 at 11:12 PM Post #2 of 18

Factor

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The question "Where do I go from Kind Of Blue?" is so common that it should have its own dedicated word. For example, you could just say "skeezgorten," and people would say something like "Check out The Sound Of Sonny by Sonny Rollins."
 
Feb 25, 2006 at 11:13 PM Post #3 of 18

daycart1

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If you like ALS, you might try some even later Coltrane--Transitions would be a good small step..

Moving backward in time, you can't go wrong with the -Jazz Messengers-. I especially like their stuff featuring Wayne Shorter on tenor.

I can remember the excitement of starting out just as you are!
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Feb 25, 2006 at 11:16 PM Post #5 of 18

bigshot

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Since you're on a Miles kick, you should try Birth of the Cool. Also check out Art Pepper's early (pre-heroin) albums (Meets the Rhythm Section, Plus 11, etc.) Sonny Rollins' Saxophone Colossus, Way Out West and Tenor Madness, and Shorty Rogers and his Giants, and Cool & the Crazy.

See ya
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Feb 26, 2006 at 12:02 AM Post #6 of 18

Aman

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Well, since you seem to like that fusion stuff, definitely check out Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey and Medeski Martin and Wood. Both are utterly superb jazz groups taking the genre to new levels. Other good fusion choices are John Abercrombie, The Mahavishnu Orchestra and, for interesting big-band fusion, check out Frank Zappa and his three big ones: "Hot Rats", "Waka/Jawaka", and "The Grand Wazoo".

On the "Kind of Blue" level, RUN, don't walk, and buy Cannonball Adderly - "Somethin' Else". It's one of the best jazz albums of all time. Also check out Charles Mingus - "Mingus Ah Um", John Coltrane - "My Favorite Things", "Sun Ship", and "Crescent". For a more interesting spin on jazz improvisation, but still pretty Miles-esque, listen to some Ornette Coleman, specifically "The Sound of Jazz to Come".

If you've got a more open mind, check out some releases by Peter Brotzmann, Sun Ra, and Eric Dolphy.

Hope this helps!
 
Feb 26, 2006 at 12:02 AM Post #7 of 18

BluesDaddy

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Feb 26, 2006 at 2:00 AM Post #9 of 18

Coltrane

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Quote:

Originally Posted by bigshot
Since you're on a Miles kick, you should try Birth of the Cool. Also check out Art Pepper's early (pre-heroin) albums (Meets the Rhythm Section, Plus 11, etc.)



Good albums, but those are hardly pre-heroin. Pepper started using in the late 40s/early 50s and Meets The Rhythm Section was recorded in the depths of his addiction. He even said that when he recorded that album he hadnt played in weeks and his horn barely worked. He didnt even know the tunes and tried to them from just memory of hearing. He sure did pretty well though.
 
Feb 26, 2006 at 2:11 AM Post #10 of 18

Aman

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Quote:

Originally Posted by GTroy
so you like hard bop?
....
the little less known keith jarrett, he's good too.



I would consider Keith Jarrett to be more "post-bop". Hard bop is often times played by the likes of Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Mingus, Lonnie Smith, and Pharoah Sanders. It's be-bop, but it's louder and crazier. Keith Jarrett was doing a completely new thing over at ECM, so I really wouldn't call him that. His sound is more funkified and more electric, which makes me think he's more in the same league as John Abercrombie, David Holland, Jack DeJohnette, and those fellows.
 
Feb 26, 2006 at 2:40 AM Post #11 of 18

Coltrane

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Aman
I would consider Keith Jarrett to be more "post-bop". Hard bop is often times played by the likes of Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Mingus, Lonnie Smith, and Pharoah Sanders. It's be-bop, but it's louder and crazier. Keith Jarrett was doing a completely new thing over at ECM, so I really wouldn't call him that. His sound is more funkified and more electric, which makes me think he's more in the same league as John Abercrombie, David Holland, Jack DeJohnette, and those fellows.


As long as we are nit-picking genres... Rahsaan and Pharaoh and the like are definitely not hard bop. Hard bop is a slowed down bebop with slighty more emphasis on melody. Freddie Hubbard, Lee Morgan, Art Blakey, and even Miles from 55-60 were the epitome of hard bop. Basically Blue Note records and their entire stable of artists. Kirk, Dolphy, Sam Rivers, and even Wayne Shorter are more free-bop(for complete lack of a better word) or atleast at the very very outer edges of hard bop. Mingus is, of course, uncategorizable, like Monk. They are their own genres.
 
Feb 26, 2006 at 3:18 AM Post #12 of 18

Aman

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Coltrane
As long as we are nit-picking genres... Rahsaan and Pharaoh and the like are definitely not hard bop. Hard bop is a slowed down bebop with slighty more emphasis on melody. Freddie Hubbard, Lee Morgan, Art Blakey, and even Miles from 55-60 were the epitome of hard bop. Basically Blue Note records and their entire stable of artists. Kirk, Dolphy, Sam Rivers, and even Wayne Shorter are more free-bop(for complete lack of a better word) or atleast at the very very outer edges of hard bop. Mingus is, of course, uncategorizable, like Monk. They are their own genres.


Thanks for the clarification.
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Feb 26, 2006 at 1:31 PM Post #13 of 18

ssportclay

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Quote:

Originally Posted by coffeeaddict
Well, of the albums I've listened to:

Kind of Blue quickly became one of my favourite albums of any genre.

Bitches Brew was great.

And Sketches of Spain and A Love Supreme were good.

If the jazz experts of HeadFi would recommend something I might like, that'd be great..

If these are uninformed, offensive, ridiculous newbie opinions, then forgive me... and please recommend some more stuff like Kind of Blue anyways
580smile.gif



Get on google and type in 100 best jazz CDs.You will get several excellent lists.You will run out of money before you run out of choices.
 
Feb 27, 2006 at 5:51 AM Post #14 of 18

OceanEnthusiast

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i'll echo coltrane's 'blue trane'. great album.

also check out thelonious monk. i have monk's music and it's a favorite of mine. recorded in the late 50's, coltrane is in the group and rips into a fantastic solo in the second cut, on thelonious's audible cue call out saying "coltrane, coltrane!" in the background. one of my favorite jazz moments.

but i imagine all of the albums mentioned so far will be worthwhile for you, don't be afraid to try a few.
 
Feb 27, 2006 at 11:10 AM Post #15 of 18

iSleipnir

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I really love Louis Jordan. Check out the $30 box set on amazon. Its 5 cds and has a ton of great and really fun(ny) jazz on it. Not as popularly mentioned as other jazz icons but still an icon in his own right.
 

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