I just got a pair of DT 990 pro, I have a question about them
Jan 11, 2013 at 1:05 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 5

Snarff

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I have noticed with the dt 990 pro they sound a lot lower than my other headphones, I have the e7/e9 combo, e11 and a cmoy from jds labs. I have tested the 990 on all them and I have to turn up the volume on the amps. My other headphones are Denon d2000 and grado sr80 I normally have the volume with them around 30-40% with the dt 990 I turn it up to about 60-70% just wanted to is that normal with higher impedance headphones.
 
 
Thanks
 
Jan 11, 2013 at 1:12 AM Post #2 of 5

garetz

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Yes that is normal, higher impedance phones sound muted unless the amp is powerful enough to drive them.
 
Jan 11, 2013 at 1:15 PM Post #5 of 5

MalVeauX

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Quote:
I have noticed with the dt 990 pro they sound a lot lower than my other headphones, I have the e7/e9 combo, e11 and a cmoy from jds labs. I have tested the 990 on all them and I have to turn up the volume on the amps. My other headphones are Denon d2000 and grado sr80 I normally have the volume with them around 30-40% with the dt 990 I turn it up to about 60-70% just wanted to is that normal with higher impedance headphones.
 
 
Thanks

 
Completely normal.
 
High impedance (impedance is resistance) means it is introducing a barrier to the electricity coming from the amplifier, so the amplifier is given work to do, a load if you will. The amplifier therefore has to ramp up either voltage or current to overcome the barrier (resistance) and then produce the work on the diaphragm of the headphone to get it to move. Higher impedance headphones require higher amounts of voltage from an amplifier in order to to over come the resistance and allow current to pass. You just introduced a 250ohm resistance headphone, instead of what you're used to with the Denons/Grados, which are like 25ohms to 32ohms or something along those lines (very efficient, very low impedance). That increase in voltage requirement, means you had to turn up the volume to increase it's output.
 
You might want to read up on some of this stuff before you buy things. Not trying to be rude about it, but you could easily buy something expensive and find out it doesn't work well with what you had in mind.
 
Very best,
 

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