I have a DIY mod idea to convert an RCA into solderless :)
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RnB180

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anyone ever try making a solderless RCA cable?

I had an idea, why not just heatshrink with dual wall of what have you the signal pin to the conductor and crimp to the ground wire or shield.
viola!

instant audiophile cable
 
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Emon

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People seem to think soldering will affect the sound. Bullocks. If you actually think the few mils of solder between two conductors is going to make a noticable difference in sound quality...um, go take a basic electronics course.
 
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bhjazz

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Emon
People seem to think soldering will affect the sound. Bullocks. If you think the solder between two conductors...


Another thing to note is soldering technique. The best connections usually have wire bent in a loop around what it is being connected to, then solder is dropped in to keep it from moving. Solderless connections can move and cause shorts in the future. Hey, try what you wish...then report back to us!
 
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Emon

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Also, I'll point out that unless your dual wall heatshrink is VERY HARD when it's shrunk, that connection won't last long. Crimp connectors usually surround the entire circumference of the wire...you'll be trying to hold the wires together with heatshrink adhesive.

Crimp connectors are cheap and easy - ask any electrician, they'll tell you solder joints are always superior. I wouldn't be suprised if a lot of house fires caused by bad electricial were because of poor connections. When you crimp or wire cap (ESPECIALLY wire cap, crimp isn't that bad if done right) and the connection loosens over time due to vibrations, you end up with two conductors touching at a really small point...and when you're pushing 120 or 240 VAC and 20 amps through it, smaller conact means more resistance...which means heat...which means fire.

Anyway maybe that's not the cause of a lot of house fires, crimps are pretty good if you do them right, but the point is that solder is better. If you HONESTLY think 60/40 electrical solder will somehow effect sound quality, go buy some of that 40 dollar/pound Cardas solder. At least you'll get a good joint and I hear it smells good.
 
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Garbz

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Plus open up the amp of your choice and count the solder joints. Chances are even $80000 krell monoblocks use standard 60/40 solder.
 
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Emon

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Heh. I actually found JB Weld to be slightly capacitative. I used it to join a large aluminum electrode and copper wire for a touch sensor IC circuit. It knocked the sensitivity down a bit, and I didn't have any lead/zinc (or is it tin/zinc?) solder on hand for aluminum (who does?) so I tried JB Weld. Of course I could've used electrically conductive epoxy (used for repairing rear window defrosters) or just a screw or rivet, but I was just messing around. Worked suprisingly well though.
 
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arspy87

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What about using hot glue or epoxy?
 
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