How to get internet on two desktops at home?
Nov 13, 2008 at 4:48 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 19

hear_the_sound

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Hi there,
Currently I have internet on my desktop and I'm using a wireless router to get internet access to my laptop.

I'm buying another desktop. How would I get internet on that, since it doesn't have a wireless receiver (or so I think it doesn't?)
What gear do I need to buy or what configurations do I need to make?

MY ISP is Champion Broadband.

Thanks
 
Nov 13, 2008 at 6:10 AM Post #2 of 19

jonathanjong

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Do you have a multi=port router? I mean, it sounds like your modem is connected to both your desktop AND your wireless router. Isn't there room for one more connexion? Otherwise, just get a wireless card for your desktop, I reckon. Or, if you can spare the USB slot, get a USB wireless receiver.
 
Nov 13, 2008 at 12:25 PM Post #4 of 19

leftnose

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Nov 13, 2008 at 3:02 PM Post #6 of 19

krmathis

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A WLAN card..., or just one of those USB dongles.
 
Nov 14, 2008 at 5:19 AM Post #8 of 19

appophylite

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Plug the new desktop into the router with Cat 5/6 ethernet cable (if the router has ports for multiple computers to be hooked up).

Connect an internal PCI card with wireless antenna inside the new computer so it can connect over the wireless signal.

Use a usb wireless internet card/dongle to connect to the wireless signal.

All three methods were mentioned and any one should suit your purposes just fine.
 
Nov 14, 2008 at 10:16 AM Post #9 of 19

j2kei

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easiest way is wireless router, preferably one that could be upgrade to DD-WRT or other 3rd party software. a really good example is linksys wrt54gl if you arent picky about N. if all else fails, find a router on sale that just works period
biggrin.gif
gl
 
Nov 14, 2008 at 2:00 PM Post #10 of 19

krmathis

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Quote:

Originally Posted by j2kei /img/forum/go_quote.gif
easiest way is wireless router, preferably one that could be upgrade to DD-WRT or other 3rd party software. a really good example is linksys wrt54gl if you arent picky about N. if all else fails, find a router on sale that just works period
biggrin.gif
gl



Why would he need a second wireless router?
He already have one wireless router to get internet access to his laptop...
 
Nov 14, 2008 at 3:32 PM Post #11 of 19

zx10guy

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Quote:

Originally Posted by leftnose /img/forum/go_quote.gif
If your new desktop is not going to be near the router, get a USB wireless adapter.

Newegg.com - Zonet ZEW2500P IEEE 802.11b/g MINI USB / USB 2.0 802.11g 54Mbps Wireless Adapter Up to 54Mbps Data Rates 64/128-Bit WEP, WPA - Wireless Adapters

Note that I haven't used the above adapter but it has pretty good reviews.

If your desktop is going to be near your router, plug it in with an Ethernet cable. If your router doesn't support gigabit (not too many do), use CAT5e. It's cheaper.



CAT5e also supports GigE. CAT5 is only rated to support 100Mbit speeds but I've heard of some situations where people have been successful in getting some decent performance out of a short run of CAT5 cable between GigE devices. The difference between different catgory wiring is the construction of the cable which supports higher bandwidth.
 
Nov 14, 2008 at 3:38 PM Post #12 of 19

zx10guy

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My preference is always go wired when you can. When you start adding more and more wireless devices on the same access point, your network performance will begin to suffer. All wireless technologies operate in half duplex mode. Not to mention all the speed claims are theoretical speeds under lab/ideal conditions. When you stack in real life noise on the open wireless frequencies with signal attenuation due to objects in the way, and the wireless overhead (ie encryption), your wireless speeds are going to much much less than what is being claimed.
 
Nov 15, 2008 at 12:15 AM Post #13 of 19

hear_the_sound

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I also agree that wires are more reliable but I don't think they're an option for me because the second desktop will be two rooms away from the modem. I'm familiar with USB devices...just plug it in and go. How does a wireless card work? Will I have to break open the back of my computer and stick it in there? Is a card more efficient/reliable than an USB adaptor? I can spare one USB slot.
Thanks for all the input.
 
Nov 16, 2008 at 5:01 PM Post #14 of 19

krmathis

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An USB adapter is perfectly fine, as long as you get one from a renowned vendor.
 
Nov 16, 2008 at 7:33 PM Post #15 of 19

hear_the_sound

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