How to acquire a British accent?
Jun 15, 2007 at 8:43 PM Post #17 of 83

Duggeh

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There are as many British regional accents as there are American ones, but I assume that you mean the slightly stiff upper lip slightly posh north English well to do accent, I cant imagine anyone wanting a Glasgow accent or a Newcastle accent for example.

Best advice I can offer you is to watch a lot of British television and practice one you like.
 
Jun 15, 2007 at 8:49 PM Post #18 of 83

MrSlacker

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I would love to get a nice British accent... for some weird reason, girls around here just LOVE it
 
Jun 15, 2007 at 9:04 PM Post #19 of 83

saint.panda

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Duggeh /img/forum/go_quote.gif
There are as many British regional accents as there are American ones, but I assume that you mean the slightly stiff upper lip slightly posh north English well to do accent, I cant imagine anyone wanting a Glasgow accent or a Newcastle accent for example.

Best advice I can offer you is to watch a lot of British television and practice one you like.



Well, as much as I'd like to talk like Blair, I'd be content with the kind of British accent that some students get after 2-3 years in England. So that's probably the type of English you're referring to.

And no, I don't want a Glasgow accent. Loved the scenery though.
 
Jun 15, 2007 at 9:12 PM Post #20 of 83

whistler

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Quote:

Originally Posted by saint.panda /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Inspired by the American accent thread, how do you learn to speak with a more British accent without actually living there? Somebody told me to watch BBC or check Blair's speeches on youtube. Any other suggestions?


Well my cousin went to school and aquired a sweet southern, US south, drawl when she went to work as a telephone operator for the old Bell phone company. She went from Long Islan/New York accent to a Southern drawl.

so one option is to find a teacher/coach of voice who could teach you. Which is what an actor would do.
 
Jun 15, 2007 at 9:16 PM Post #21 of 83

DJShadow

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Quote:

Originally Posted by ecclesand /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Daryl Hammond on SNL does a pretty good Scottish (ala Sean Connery) accent in the Jeapordy bit....


Am I the only one thinks Sean Connery's Scottish accent is crap?
 
Jun 15, 2007 at 9:54 PM Post #22 of 83

Vicomte

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Quote:

Originally Posted by MrSlacker /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I would love to get a nice British accent... for some weird reason, girls around here just LOVE it


Tru dat.

For the British guys: Do British women like American accents as much as American women like British accents?
 
Jun 15, 2007 at 9:55 PM Post #23 of 83

craiglester

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Quote:

Originally Posted by MrSlacker /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I would love to get a nice British accent... for some weird reason, girls around here just LOVE it


One has to agree here, a nice British accent does work wonders with the ladies here in the US. Of course, I'm married so it's a moot point..
biggrin.gif
 
Jun 15, 2007 at 10:01 PM Post #24 of 83

Duggeh

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Vicomte /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Tru dat.

For the British guys: Do British women like American accents as much as American women like British accents?



I've never known for a woman to have that kind of preference. Then again it isnt something I ask about.
 
Jun 15, 2007 at 10:12 PM Post #25 of 83

AuroraProject

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Vicomte /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Tru dat.

For the British guys: Do British women like American accents as much as American women like British accents?



Yes, it works both ways. Very easy conversation starter, used it many times myself.
 
Jun 15, 2007 at 10:24 PM Post #26 of 83

kerelybonto

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If you're going to try to develop a British accent, pick the right one. Many British regional accents are quite difficult for people from elsewhere to understand. Stick with the Received Pronunciation (aka Standard English aka the Queen's English aka BBC English) or perhaps the Edinburgh accent.

The most basic difference from American accents of most of the comprehensible British accents is that in the latter the letter "R" is not pronounced unless it is followed by a vowel. The British also pronounce some other consants differently (e.g., the soft "D" in words like "during"), but the main differences are in sounds and lengths of vowels, which are particularly hard to describe in writing.

The BBC has an excellent website called Voices that's all about different British accents (and a bit about foreign languages and accents). Wikipedia also has a lot of information, though it may be difficult for you as a foreigner without a good reference point to understand the sounds described; knowing the international phonetic alphabet and the basics of phonetical linguistics is also helpful.

You know, there are phonetics instructors who can teach you how to speak a certain way. As a native speaker of English I've not ever been to a English phonetics instructor, but when I studied in Russia I improved my accent greatly with some phonetics instructions (so much so that Russians often seemed to mistake me for a particually stupid Russian rather a foreigner learning the language). It's really surprising how much having someone point out the way things sound helps in recognizing and imitating the sounds of a particular accent. Maybe you should look for a Henry Higgins-type in Zurich.

Eric
 
Jun 15, 2007 at 10:52 PM Post #30 of 83

Vicomte

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Ligeia /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I'm not sure that I want the accent, but I do love the quirks and verbiage of the language. I like calling someone a nutter and slagging the lot of them off.


I've noticed I've adopted many British-isms, myself. I'm not sure why, I think it has something to do with reading to many English authors or some such.

Just last week I believe I said something was completely 'knackered' and described how I 'took the piss' out of some 'chap'. Needless to say, I got some strange looks. I suppose I'm thankful that my friends are understanding...
 

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