How do I rip the tunes from a DVD Video?
Jun 23, 2016 at 6:27 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 15

Justin Uthadude

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I did a search, and although many posts came up, I couldn't find an answer. I have ripped DVD-A, SACD, etc., but I cant figure out how to get the songs off of James Blunt Rhapsody Originals Live Performances 350460-2. Can anyone help me?
Justin
 
P.S. I usually use EAC
 
Jun 23, 2016 at 7:05 PM Post #2 of 15

sterling1

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Buy a CD Recorder and then send digital audio from DVD player to the recorder. Put CD in computer and rip.
 
Jun 23, 2016 at 7:06 PM Post #3 of 15

Mython

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You didn't say what platform your computer is.
 
There are numerous DVD Audio Rippers available, for around $30 each (www.dvdae.com, Tipard, Xilisoft, Joboshare, etc.), although I will warn you that many of them don't do a great job of accurately ripping the correct starting-point and end-point of each track, and most of them will not let you save to PCM WAV - they often force you to rip to a crappy lossy codec like .mp3 or .aac.
Generally, they do as one would expect - seek for the video chapter markers, and rip according to those, but DVD does not use SMPTE timecode to keep audio precisely in-synch with video - the audio is actually multiplexed quite laxly with the video.
 
On the extremely-rare occasions when I rip audio from a DVD (I'm on Windows platform), I tend to use a decent standard (not audio-specific) ripper, like DVD Decrypter (Freeware), to get the entire VIDEO_TS contents of the DVD disc onto my harddrive, and then the VOBs can either be manually demuxed (the audio and video seperated from one another), or the audio can be transcoded to PCM WAV (using simple freeware like DVD2AVI or even Videolan / VLC media player). (Actually, DVD Decrypter will rip directly to audio, if you know how to do it, and I can explain if you'd like me to).
 
In either case, the demuxed, or transcoded-to-PCM WAV, audio file(s) can be brought into an audio NLE like Adobe Audition, Steinberg Wavelab, Audacity, etc. to render individual tracks. It's a bit involved, but highly-accurate.
 
 
Bear in mind that many DVDs (unless they are specifically aimed at higher quality audio reproduction) tend to be highly-compressed Dolby .ac3 format, so sound quality can be an issue.
 
 
.
 
Jun 23, 2016 at 8:21 PM Post #4 of 15

HiFiGuy528

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I've been using this for a few years with good results. Keep in mind that some DVD concerts are mastered very poorly so your miles may vary. I recommend to export in AIFF or WAV 16/48kHz or 24/48kHz DVD native.
 
http://www.dvdae.com
 
Jun 25, 2016 at 1:19 AM Post #5 of 15

Justin Uthadude

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Thank you everyone for your help. If the quality isn't that good, perhaps I will give it up. It's borderline if I want to save a good performance and live with sh^^ty quality or forget it.
Justin
 
Jun 25, 2016 at 9:02 AM Post #6 of 15

HiFiGuy528

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  Thank you everyone for your help. If the quality isn't that good, perhaps I will give it up. It's borderline if I want to save a good performance and live with sh^^ty quality or forget it.
Justin

 
This is how I see it. If the song or concert is not available then a mediocre sounding file is better then nothing. The sound quality really depends on the DVD. Some sound as good as a commercial CD while some sounds like bootleg.
 
Jun 25, 2016 at 9:02 AM Post #7 of 15

Mython

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The quality very much depends on what audio format the author chose when authoring the DVD (and, of course the usual caveats of recording quality and mastering, before the DVD author even got his/her hands on the assets).
 
If it's DTS, the back cover will generally state this very clearly, as the publisher wants to impress potential buyers.
 
But, even if it's not DTS, if you look very carefully at the tiny fine-print, the audio specs are often stated. Unless otherwise stated, the default industry standard tends to be .ac3
 
 
 
On the plus side, these days, DAPs will play any standard sample rate and bit-depth, whereas, not long ago, it was necessary to re-sample  DVD rips to 16/44.1 (DVD is generally 16/48).
 
So, at least that's one quality-degradation that can be avoided, now.
 
 
Have a close look at the back cover of your DVD, and let me know if you can see the audio format.
 
I'm more than happy to help you do what you need, using freeware, if you decide you'd like to give it a try (I am assuming Windows platform, though)
 
Jun 25, 2016 at 11:05 AM Post #8 of 15

bgentry

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DVD-AE can help with this if all you really want is the audio.

But if you have concert DVDs, why not rip them as video/audio together, so you can enjoy the concert footage at the same time? I've done this with numerous concerts and am able to watch these with the same convenience as all of my other digital copies of movies, TV shows, and plain audio files.

Using MakeMKV, you can decrypt and rip anything you want from a DVD. Breaking it up into individual songs requires a little more effort, but I've done that too using MKVToolNix.

Brian.
 
Jun 25, 2016 at 1:06 PM Post #9 of 15

Justin Uthadude

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Actually, I lied. I have many bootlegs and many tunes from archive.org. I know it's not so much the quality, but the performance. Yes, I am now using a windows7 platform; tweaked for music. My normal listening is through Foobar, my library manager is MediaMonkey. For whatever reason, I rarely watch videos. I loaded the James Blunt video into MM and it immediately said you want video_ts or audio_ts? I said audio_ts, it said nothing. I used DVD Decrypter and ran it. Great. Guessing the audio can't become any better than the original, so I just run the video. As I type, I hear the tunes, but don't see the video (video shows when I am on MM). My snooper shows input PCM stereo 48k uncompressed, and output PCM stereo uncompressed 16-bit integer. I'm thinking, why rip it out if I can just listen to the video? Am I missing something? Thank you all.
 
P.S. Back of the video says CUSTARD NTSC DVD Video 60
 
Jun 25, 2016 at 2:30 PM Post #10 of 15

Mython

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You can demux (demultiplex) the audio from the VOBs in your VIDEO_TS rip folder, OR, you can simply extract the audio during ripping, with DVD Decrypter. As I'm sure you realise, there are quite a number of ways this particular task can be accomplished.
 
But since you are already using DVD Decrypter, I will describe how that particular piece of software can be used to get what you want.
 
 
 
Load-up DVD Decrypter again, and insert the DVD.
 
You will then see a list of the contents of the disc, from which you can cherry-pick the relevant files for audio purposes.
 
Holding-down the CTRL button, select the significantly-sized VOB files (i.e. don't select any that are just a few hundred kilobytes). In the following picture, you can see that the significantly-sized VOBs on my inserted disc happen to be:
 
VTS_02_1.VOB       [1,048,404 kb]
VTS_02_2.VOB       [1,048,404 kb]
VTS_02_3.VOB       [     84,288 kb]
 
VTS_03_1.VOB       [1,048,404 kb]
VTS_03_2.VOB       [   427,848 kb]
 
VTS_04_1.VOB       [   649,478 kb]
 

 
 
Now, because VTS_04_1.VOB is a solo, medium-sized VOB, in it's own titleset directory (VTS means Video Title Set), and towards the end of the disc, it is probably an 'extras' directory, like interviews, or whatever, but if you're unsure, just go ahead and include such VOBs, as it doesn't cost you a dime to try the ripped material and delete anything you don't want.  You will generally never need to choose ANY of the VOBs that have a designation of 'zero' at the end - e.g.: VTS_01_0.VOB  or VTS_02_0.VOB   (even if they are significantly-large). This is because VOBs with a designation of 'zero', at the end, relate to content placed within the DVD menus, not the main movie content (the DVD authoring system structures the data such that the menu sections of the multiplexed VOB are situated at the beginning of the first VOB, in each titleset, hence the 'zero' designation).
 
Anyway, in DVD Decryptor, after you have highlighted the significant VOBs, there is a 'hidden' drop-down menu option, accessible by RIGHT-clicking the mouse on any area of the highlighted block of selections you've just chosen:
 

 
From that drop-down menu, select 'Stream Processing...'
 

 
 
 
 
I realise this seems a little counter-intuitive, given that you do actually want to demux the audio content from the VOB files, but, within the following dialogue, in DVD Decrypter, please don't choose 'Demux'.
 
Just de-select the video checkbox, leaving only the primary audiostream selected (in the case of my illustration, the disc happens to have .AC3 audio format, but yours may say PCM or DTS, or, if an old PAL disc, might even say .MP2 or .M2A)
 
Then select the 'Raw' option:
 

 
 
and hit the 'OK' button, whereupon it'll take a few minutes to rip the files:
 
(note in the above screengrab, that DVD Decrypter is telling me precisely what format and bitrate the audio files are, on the disc)
 
 

 
 
 
 
Here is the result of the above rip:
 
 

 
Don't worry about the 'DELAY' messages in the filenames - that only relates to the alignment of the audio with the original video stream, and is of zero concern for our purposes.
 
Now all you need to do, if you're not playing back the files on your computer, is to drop the above files into an audio editor of your choice (Adobe Audition, CoolEdit, Audacity, Reaper, Goldwave, Steinberg Wavelab, etc.) and slice-and-dice the files into individual songs, and export them in your choice of codec. If you don't have an audio editor, yet, and you need a 'free' one, then Reaper is a decent quality option, with a nag screen, but full functionality: www.reaper.fm
PS: If your audio editor doesn't import .ac3 files, you can use freeware 'MPEG StreamClip' to transcode them (non-deleteriously) to 16bit 48khz .AIFF files. MPEG Streamclip will happily read VOBs or demuxed .AC3 files; whichever you prefer. It's a great little piece of software.
 
 
I know this tutorial does not describe the fastest way to perform this task - there are so many ways to do it (post-rip use of MPEG StreamClip, for example - see next post, below), some methods with dedicated audio-ripping functionality, such as DVDAE.com are definitely faster.
 
I have described the above method only because you already have DVD Decrypter, and it is reliable, without costing you a dime.
 
If you'd prefer to use different freeware options, and need assistance, I'll be happy to oblige.
 
 
.
 
Jun 25, 2016 at 5:08 PM Post #11 of 15

Mython

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As an alternative free method, I just tested this free audio ripper, and it worked OK (ripping/decrypting an encrypted DVD disc direct to .wav)
 
http://dvdvideomedia-free-dvd-ripper-eg.en.softonic.com/download
 
 
 
Another method is to rip your DVD (as a normal full DVD VIDEO_TS rip, to your harddrive), with DVD Decrypter (not using my earlier-posted method, but just a normal full DVD movie rip), then open the decrypted VIDEO_TS folder, on your harddrive, using MPEG StreamClip  (if you don't already have Quicktime's MPEG2 plugin installed on your machine, then you'll need to install that, or install Quicktime Alternative version 1.81), and MPEG StreamClip will allow you to export to an AIFF file (approximately-speaking, that's Apple's equivalent of .WAV), which can then be sliced-&-diced in a digital audio editor of your choice.
 

 
Jun 25, 2016 at 8:19 PM Post #12 of 15

sterling1

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Here's how I do it: Sony PCM-7010F DAT Recorder. I play the DVD and send audio to the DAT Recorder. I play back the DAT converting S/PDIF output to USB. USB is sent to computer where Roxio Recorder is used to edit. Then recording is exported to iTunes Library. Works great. There is nothing that can not be recorded with this technique, whether recording to DAT or to a CD Recorder as long as it's 16/44.1 or 16/48. If the material is on the internet it is easy to record that too as I can output the bit and bite rate which my DAT Recorder recognizes.
 
Jun 25, 2016 at 8:20 PM Post #13 of 15

Mython

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Here's how I do it: Sony PCM-7010F DAT Recorder.

 
Is that freeware?
biggrin.gif

 
Jun 27, 2016 at 8:05 AM Post #14 of 15

sterling1

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It might be today. The last time I looked on EBay, these 7000 series Sony DAT Recorders in working condition could be purchased for about three hundred dollars. I recal paying about seventy five hundred each for a pair back in 1994 or thereabouts. Seems when MP3 came out these devices became obsolete and thus the price drop.
 
Jun 27, 2016 at 8:21 AM Post #15 of 15

Mython

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Yes, I remember drooling over the Sony pocket DAT recorders, and then DV camcorders went more mainstream and took a huge bite out of DAT sales, with solidstate mp3 players appearing not long afterwards.
 

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