Help with Windows XP (DOS), please?
Nov 21, 2008 at 5:26 AM Post #17 of 36

MatthewK

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Posts
343
Likes
12
Location
Mill Creek, WA
One issue with installing/copying anything to the hard drive is if it's defective. Copying files to it could actually make it worse if that's the case. If it's a virus infection it could possibly survive an OS re-install and do more damage the second time around.

If you have any sensitive files that are not backed up you need to be very careful. I've lost things in the past that I can never get back. Copying those files should be top priority. Don't do a disk scan or anything that writes data to the HDD until you've got those important files backed up safely.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 5:30 AM Post #19 of 36

MatthewK

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Posts
343
Likes
12
Location
Mill Creek, WA
Quote:

Originally Posted by intoflatlines /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Hmm. I might have to do that.

I was able to login as an admin, but it won't let me copy files. Instead of saying "Access is denied" it just says "The file could not be copied."

Any insight on that?



Do you have two hard drives in a RAID-0 setup? That can complicate things.

It could be a corrupted file allocation table or something similar. Sometimes running CHKDSK /R will help, BUT it will write changes to the HDD which of course is risky. Only do it as a last resort.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 5:34 AM Post #20 of 36

MatthewK

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Posts
343
Likes
12
Location
Mill Creek, WA
Quote:

Originally Posted by intoflatlines /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Is it pretty simple to install to a new partition? I don't want to start it and then lose everything by accident. I'm using an HP restore disc, if that makes a difference..


If your existing partition is using 100% of the disk space, then no, you'd have to use a special program to re-adjust the size of the existing partition to make room for a new one. That's complicated and risky. Whatever you do don't run the restore disc, that will generally restore the computer back to the factory-installed state, which means losing everything you've installed/copied since you bought it.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 5:38 AM Post #22 of 36

intoflatlines

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Posts
3,300
Likes
11
Quote:

Originally Posted by MatthewK /img/forum/go_quote.gif
If your existing partition is using 100% of the disk space, then no, you'd have to use a special program to re-adjust the size of the existing partition to make room for a new one. That's complicated and risky. Whatever you do don't run the restore disc, that will generally restore the computer back to the factory-installed state, which means losing everything you've installed/copied since you bought it.


So since I only have a restore disc, all I can do is manually restore (which I've done before, see link in first post)? Other than that my only other option is to try that boot disc to copy my important files to CD/USB and reinstall Windows, or buy that thing to connect the laptop HD to another computer to copy files and then reinstall Windows?

I'm not even sure if I can make that boot disc since I only have a restore CD.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 5:44 AM Post #23 of 36

MatthewK

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Posts
343
Likes
12
Location
Mill Creek, WA
I would say the boot disc is your best bet. You'd have to make it on a different computer though. Maybe a family member or friend?

Connecting the laptop HDD to another computer is an option, but you'd have to buy an external enclosure. That probably is the easiest way to do it, except you have to spend money.

There is another thing I can think of, but it probably wouldn't work with your restore disc and might not work with your laptop's BIOS. You could hook up an external hard drive and install an OS to it, then boot to it.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 6:05 AM Post #24 of 36

intoflatlines

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Posts
3,300
Likes
11
Another computer will be no problem. I'm using the girlfriend's laptop right now.

I was able to do some of the first steps in the manual restore, but I am stuck again. It will not let me delete c:\windows\system32\config\system in order to replace it with the repair version. DOS acted like it deleted it, but when I went to replace it with the repair version, it acted like it was still there and wouldn't let me overwrite it. I can't rename it either. Now when I try to delete it, it says "the delete operation failed". I don't know why my DOS is giving me mixed signals..
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 6:15 AM Post #25 of 36

MatthewK

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Sep 3, 2007
Posts
343
Likes
12
Location
Mill Creek, WA
There is something else I just thought of that might work. If your girlfriend's laptop can take another HDD, you could pop the one out of your laptop and put it in hers (that sounded funny) as a 2nd HDD. Of course be sure both laptops are completely turned off (not just in standby) if you do this. Then just boot up and access it as the 2nd HDD.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 3:54 PM Post #27 of 36

illy2k

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Jan 2, 2007
Posts
436
Likes
11
when you say corrupted data what exactly do you mean? What is the error message that you are prompted with when you attempt to boot into the OS?
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 6:28 PM Post #28 of 36

intoflatlines

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Posts
3,300
Likes
11
If trying to boot normally, I get "A Disk Error Occured."

Sometimes I can get to the login screen but it says the login screen is corrupt.

If I let the computer run chkdsk (assuming I can get it to boot partway w/o disk error), it gets hung up repeating "inserting an index entry into index $0 of file 25".

If I enter BIOS to run a HD check, I get a read failure.

If I enter the recovery console to attempt to manually restore through DOS, I get strange symptoms. Sometimes it takes a long time for commands to go through. Sometimes it acts like it deleted a file (after a del command), but when I check the file is still there. It will not allow me to delete or rename files sometimes, saying that the operation failed.

My hard drive is not making any strange sounds at all. It sounds like it is operating as normal for the most part.

I think that data is corrupted because I just did a Windows update (which included probably a WGA check or something). On my system, I have a different/custom login screen. Since this is not allowed by Windows, this required some alterations of system files. A couple nights ago (when this all started), I was watching TV and my computer just restarted all by itself. When it tried to boot, it took a very very long time. I checked in the system log and found that there was some error while the system was trying to do something with my logon file (immediately prior to the reboot). I thought there was perhaps a virus doing something, so I tried to run a virus scan (Kaspersky IS). In doing so, the system lagged and eventually froze. Since then it has not been able to boot fully.

Sometime last night, I was actually able to boot all the way to my logon screen. I was then presented with this error box:

winlogon.exe - corrupt file

the file or directory \windows\debug\usermode\userenv.log is corrupt and unreadable. please run the ckdsk utility.
 
Nov 21, 2008 at 7:10 PM Post #29 of 36

illy2k

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Jan 2, 2007
Posts
436
Likes
11
You could always attempt to try to repair the windows installation. It should just delete and fix the windows components which are needed and shouldn't touch your data. You can do it by using your recovery CD.
 
Nov 22, 2008 at 12:27 AM Post #30 of 36

soMn

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Dec 30, 2005
Posts
156
Likes
10
the recovery console works a little differently than a standard command prompt in XP, with limited commands, and it may also may make what access you have to the HD read-only. I don't remember that for sure, but it wouldn't surprise me. here's MS's page for the recovery console with descriptions of all the commands available to you: Description of the Windows XP Recovery Console for advanced users

Have you tried either the "fixboot" or "fixmbr" commands? the installation is obviously there, (hence the presence of the recovery console), so it seems to be reading the partition correctly, just not booting windows properly. unfortunately, every recovery disk I've ever used (pretty much all brands) has only given the options for preset "fixes" which rarely work, or only work in specific circumstances, or total recovery. so if you can't repair the problem in the recovery console, or get the HD hooked up to another computer, you may be forced to lose it all.

is the problem computer a desktop or laptop? if it's a desktop, you can very easily remove the hard drive and install it into a new machine. the only thing you really have to be careful about anymore is that both use the same type of connectors, which will be obvious if you have them open. if it's a laptop, it can be harder to get the HD out at all (some Sonys and older Toshibas put the HD under the keyboard), but, and I'm not necessarily advocating this, as a former Circuit City technician, I've seen several customers buy a HD enclosure, and then return it within a week because it "didn't suit their needs." I'm sure it was for a similar situation. They used it and were done with it. On the other hand, they're only about $30 and are helpful to have around.

anyway, a little long-winded but I hope it helps.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top