Help with terminology: "Voiced for drum monitoring - not flat response"
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ThumpieBunnyEve

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I happened upon a nice noise-isolating studio quality headset today.
10hz to 30khz, with 32ohm impedance, on 40mm drivers.
they have deep cone over-ear muffs.

but i saw a line in their specification among all the other numbers and notations..

"Voiced for drum monitoring - not flat response"

does this mean there is some sort of onboard nominalization?
does it mean that there is some resistance curve against the left and right channels?
does it mean the speaker/driver is tuned for cutting out voice? or shushing base?
I've never seen a ""Voiced for drum monitoring - not flat response"" on any specification page before.

I want to use them for full dolby pro logic surround sound frequency stuff. so this
"Voiced for drum monitoring - not flat response"
is kinda worrying me and preventing me from "buying now"




Physical Characteristics
Form Factor
Circumaural​
Interfaces/Ports
Host Interface
Mini-phone​

Driver Size
1.57"​
Earpiece Type
Binaural​
Earpiece Design
Over-the-head​
Technical Information
Minimum Frequency Response
10 Hz​
Maximum Frequency Response
30 kHz​
Cable Length
6 ft​
Features
  • Comfortable
  • Sound Isolation
  • Sweat Proof
  • Lightweight
  • Rugged
  • Voiced for drum monitoring - not flat response
Sound Mode
Stereo​
Impedance
32 Ohm​
Connectivity Technology
Wired​


Edit:
While i feel naming the make and model of the headset is not relevant and will possibly stir controversy reguarding price-point vs value, and result in oversimplified unhelpfull posts like "that brand is dookie! you should get this brand!" and such. i will, as requested list the brand and model:
Alesis Drp100
Please understand i am not looking for another headset or to debate its worth.
My question is simply, what does this mean? "Voiced for drum monitoring - not flat response"
 
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Claypole

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I would suggest naming the make and model of the headphone, so if people are familiar with them, they can hopefully tell you all need to know.
 
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ProtegeManiac

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My question is simply, what does this mean? "Voiced for drum monitoring - not flat response"
First off, no headphone has a perfectly flat response from 20hz to 20,000hz.

What that note on it means though is that they're outwardly open about it not being in any way flat or what they'd use for listening to music because they boosted the region where the drums are, ie around 40hz to 250hz, plus the natural tendency of many dynamic drivers used as fullrange drivers to have a spike somewhere between 3000hz and 10,000hz for the cymbals.

It's like a Grado but no boost anywhere around 1000hz to 2000hz where the vocals are (mostly), or some Superlux (especially the one that looks like the DT770).
 
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ThumpieBunnyEve

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I see. so they aren't going to be useful for the regular music range then : (
I've a hard enough time avoiding devices that have the base and treble focused.
a lot of stuff i run into tends to mud out the midrange or vocals in favor of drums and base already, which is pretty awful for 8/16 bit music.
i guess ill keep looking then. ty for definition.
 
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