Headphone specs?
Nov 29, 2008 at 3:46 AM Post #2 of 22

toxic888

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Nov 19, 2008
Posts
274
Likes
0
You wouldn't hear those frequencies anyway? What are you asking anyway, what headphones? :/
 
Nov 29, 2008 at 4:08 AM Post #4 of 22

ericj

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Aug 2, 2005
Posts
8,262
Likes
142
You've heard of the rubber yardstick, right?

Published frequency response specs are like a yardstick that says "For Entertainment Purposes Only" on it.

They're lying. With math. By not showing their work.
 
Nov 29, 2008 at 4:25 AM Post #5 of 22

EtherealApril

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Apr 3, 2006
Posts
126
Likes
0
The frequency response specs for headphones don't actually tell anything about how a headphone may sound, just the frequency extremes that the phone can supposedly reach. They're also not very useful for comparing phones because manufacturers test under different conditions and with different tolerences.

If you want to hear how low a phone can reach before you buy it, I suggest that you compile some test tones or tracks with low frequencies on a CD and listen to it through the phones. Trust your ears, not the manufacturers' specs.
 
Nov 29, 2008 at 8:21 AM Post #6 of 22

krmathis

Head-Fi's Most Prolific Poster
Joined
Jan 13, 2004
Posts
34,764
Likes
76
Yeah, if the specifications say so then they most probably can reproduce the frequency. You wont be able to hear it though...
Example the Stax SR-007, which have a frequency response down to 6Hz.
 
Nov 29, 2008 at 5:45 PM Post #8 of 22

LnxPrgr3

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
May 23, 2008
Posts
258
Likes
11
Many a $5 pack of headphones claims 20Hz to 20kHz response. I'm not really sure what qualifies as a "response" in this case...

...and that's exactly the problem. There is no generally followed standard for what counts as a response for the purposes of that spec. It's completely arbitrary.

It's a pretty safe bet, though, that even if headphones can produce a 15Hz sound, it'll be a lot quieter than they could manage at 200Hz, even ignoring whether a human listener would hear the 15Hz at all.
 
Nov 29, 2008 at 5:46 PM Post #9 of 22

paaj

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Posts
2,139
Likes
22
Location
Amsterdam
if they say 20-20000hz (like ibud
tongue.gif
) they forget to say at what levels the extremes come through... yes they move, but so little you won't hear anything. given values are only a little usefull when they give the deviations (eq +- 3db means something like the given extremes are at most 3db lower than average).
they'd probably get away with stating 0-100000hz (at +-100db levels...)
 
Nov 29, 2008 at 6:07 PM Post #10 of 22

LnxPrgr3

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
May 23, 2008
Posts
258
Likes
11
Quote:

Originally Posted by paaj /img/forum/go_quote.gif
if they say 20-20000hz (like ibud
tongue.gif
) they forget to say at what levels the extremes come through... yes they move, but so little you won't hear anything.



I dunno... 25dB or so down from flat isn't too far off to count, is it?
graphCompare.php


Does Apple actually claim 20-20000 on these? I can't find specs listed anywhere to confirm.
 
Nov 29, 2008 at 6:13 PM Post #11 of 22

paaj

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Apr 28, 2008
Posts
2,139
Likes
22
Location
Amsterdam
I don't know really, I think people can hear about 40db difference in dynamics if they try hard, but it does mean it'll be considerably lower than the rest of the music so you won't hear much of it. compare it to HD600:
graphCompare.php


one kind of standard i think (with speakers mostly) is measuring the +-3db points. still does not say much about the sound though.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top