Headphone recommendations for a 6 month old fetus.
Nov 26, 2008 at 2:44 AM Post #31 of 53

TopPop

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Oh, and you might want to consider getting off of your high horse, Mr. Fancy Scientist.

There are plenty of us in here who conduct scientific research for a living, though choose not to be condescending about it.
 
Nov 26, 2008 at 2:49 AM Post #32 of 53

jonathanjong

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I don't think I'm being condescending, but if I am, I'm sorry. I'm just frustrated that people don't seem to care about what the data says. We get a lot of that here in NZ. Popular attitudes towards child-rearing, courtroom interviewing, education, etc. seem to totally ignore or blatantly contradict the evidence.
 
Nov 26, 2008 at 3:15 AM Post #33 of 53

Peter Pinna

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Quote:

Originally Posted by jonathanjong /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I'm glad you pointed out that this is your opinion. There is no rigourous evidence that pre-natal exposure to music - classical or otherwise - has any positive effects on cognitive skills. There are a smattering of studies that seem to suggest that classical music is good for kids, but these studies are all devastatingly flawed. They often fail to control for very obvious potential confounding variables. None of this is my opinion, as such. I suppose the evaluation of an experiment as methodologically sound or not is, in some sense, a matter of my opinion...but still, most experimentalists will agree with my assessment of these studies.


You will please note that I used the word "perhaps" and the phrase "I think" in my post. I never claimed to be an authority on this subject. Perhaps I should have prefaced my statement by saying something to the effect of "If this is at all possible, it would seem to me that perhaps ..."
My comments were meant from a casual perspective and not meant to be taken as factual. They were meant to be taken with the proverbial "grain of salt". My opinion is, when everything is taken into consideration it is better if children listen to classical music as opposed to very loud Heavy Metal with offensive lyrics among other annoyances.
 
Nov 26, 2008 at 3:23 AM Post #34 of 53

Zanth

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Quote:

Originally Posted by jonathanjong /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I'm just frustrated that people don't seem to care about what the data says.


I think the key here is that there is no worthwhile data and the little data that is around is nearly as useful as anecdotal information in terms of harm to a fetus. For this reason, I figure many are thinking that you pushing the point that it IS detrimental to a fetus is nothing more than an opinion pumped up with a degree and a course or two behind you. No doubt, this is usually a ratio of a zillion to nothing in terms of what others have, but given the variety of practices, the fact that headphones have a far less output volume through tissue than speakers and the fact that no one (I hope I can say that with some faith) here would BLAST their music thus freaking the living daylights (or amniotic fluid lights!) out of the kid.

My wife and I did this not just for our son but our daughter too. Now it could be genetics *blushing* but my son is flying off of all the bloody cognitive ability scales around. Does that mean he's a little genius who could have been a big genius had I not pumped some music from a pesky Austrian and a Canadian and Scot through the womb? Perhaps, but my anecdotal success data is about as useful as the inconclusive data that exists in literature, plainly - inconclusive on any meaningful scale.

Should your advice be at least marginally heeded? Certainly. Don't freak your kid out with high volumes! But pumping in some sweet tunes is gonna be FAR less traumatic on embryonic growth than momma and poppa getting in some post-pregnancy loving which is 100% safe in most cases (acrobats and crack heads need not apply!) and is highly recommended to get the birthing on its way!

Just to clarify for those feeling awkward after that post, I didn't touch my wife once we knew she was pregnant. The thought disgusted me. I'm still in trouble for that
smily_headphones1.gif
 
Nov 26, 2008 at 3:25 AM Post #35 of 53

Peter Pinna

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Wmcmanus /img/forum/go_quote.gif
My wife is not pregnant yet because, well, I don't have a wife. But that's not beyond the realm of possibility. I hope to have a wife one day, actually. Assuming that when and if such a lucky lady does arrive in my life, that she'll also be a willing incubator, we can together do our part to propagate the species. In the meantime and in celebration of this hope, I've been running a splitter out of my iPod, thus allowing me to listen to one pair of IEM's (with my ears) while simultaneously providing an aural stimulus to Mr. Johnson. The way I figure, you can never start too soon! Intelligent seeds make for intelligent crops.


Considering the size of Mr. Johnson's head, how can you possibly adjust the headband to be that small?
wink_face.gif


Edit: Not that I've ever seen Mr. Johnson's head...
 
Nov 26, 2008 at 3:35 AM Post #36 of 53

jonathanjong

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Hmm, maybe I was pushing a bit too hard. (Hmm, that sounded naughty.
biggrin.gif
)

All I meant to say was that, there's currently no evidence that prenatal exposure to music is beneficial. The few studies that conclude with non-null results are methodologically flawed. At least this is up till mid-2008. I've not done another extensive review of the literature since then. So, that's point 1: There's no evidence it works. Point 2 is that the headphone-to-fetus thing might be harmful. Now, I want it to be clear that there's no data directly demonstrating this. So...my conclusion? Why take the risk? That's all I'm saying.
 
Nov 26, 2008 at 3:35 AM Post #37 of 53

philip1

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My opinion is only worth the bits and bytes its typed in but here it is....
soothing music wether played (at a safe volume) to the baby or shared via speakers with the mother probably lowers the mother's stress level which in turn benefits the fetus. The argument about mental stimulation will continue probably till time ends. I have no claim to any special education I am just observing from real life. I can say playing classical music for your kids once they are born seems to help them concentrate and therefore learn more.
 
Nov 26, 2008 at 3:42 AM Post #38 of 53

jonathanjong

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Quote:

Originally Posted by philip1 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
My opinion is only worth the bits and bytes its typed in but here it is....
soothing music wether played (at a safe volume) to the baby or shared via speakers with the mother probably lowers the mother's stress level which in turn benefits the fetus.



That's a reasonable hypothesis, actually. I wonder if it's been tested.
 
Nov 26, 2008 at 3:43 AM Post #39 of 53

Zanth

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Quote:

Originally Posted by jonathanjong /img/forum/go_quote.gif
So...my conclusion? Why take the risk? That's all I'm saying.


I think that is very important. Many won't think about this and may well blast the poor creature with some Death Metal for kicks (and I use that pun intensionally!)

That said, so long as the music is at or below typical indoor voice decibel range, I don't think one has to worry about the effects, but I'm a trooper! I will report back with my findings once I get dunked in the gunk! Saturday morning can't come soon enough!
 
Nov 26, 2008 at 3:52 AM Post #40 of 53

craiglester

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Quote:

Originally Posted by jonathanjong /img/forum/go_quote.gif
That's a reasonable hypothesis, actually. I wonder if it's been tested.


a quick google shows it has, i'm surprised your extensive review of the literature didn't turn up any info.
 
Nov 26, 2008 at 12:26 PM Post #42 of 53

tufflitestudios

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I find this thread amusing for the most part and appreciate everyone's feedback. However, the assumption that my pregnant wife is going to be binge drinking, chain smoking, and doing lines while in a mosh pit is a little insulting. I assume warning against these things is meant to be helpful but lets all try to be sensitive to people feelings and not make too many assumptions. On the other hand there is no reason to treat this matter with kid gloves this thread was intended to spark a fun, playful, and interesting discussion.

For what it's worth the baby has been to three concerts so far Dinosaur Junior, Medeski Martin & Wood and Arlo Guthrie. Before going to the concerts we discussed the loud music factor with out doctor who told us it is not an issue for the baby. I have been to several concerts since the moment of conception and I always wear Etymotic earplugs to avoid hearing damage. It's interesting that people on headphone message boards would suggest not going to concerts.

For those that are interested headphones or bellyphoens they have not been used and won't be until we talk to or doctor about it. We plan on getting medical advice from our treating doctors not from on line message boards. While there has been lots of opinions and advice given I find it interesting that this thread has gone 5 pages with out "asking your doctor first" being thrown into the mix.
 
Nov 26, 2008 at 1:44 PM Post #43 of 53

craiglester

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commom sense prevails here.. by all means let the baby get used to music, it's a part of life after all.. if it helps the mom relax, that's bette for the baby too. Obviously don't go out of your way to startle the baby with loud aggressive music.

But hey, it's your baby after all.. do as you like, within reason
 
Nov 26, 2008 at 9:39 PM Post #44 of 53

Zanth

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If you went to a Dinosaur Junior concert and the doc said it was okay, there is no way headphones can do more damage than that!

A few years ago I was at a New Year's Eve part with a few famous DJ's pumping out the tunes. It was LOUD, it was in a HORRIBLE venue and the bass reflections off the walls was INSANE. Everyone was getting slammed with bass from all angles. One of my friends was about 4 months pregnant and she was a bit nervous about the vibrations and she herself was feeling a bit outta whack from all the sound slamming. She left early. She's nurse in obstetrics and wouldn't have gone to the concert at all without the knowledge of it being loud. The fact that it was like standing next to a 747 meant it was far louder than one would have expected and by the end of the night, they actually turned it down, but by then she had left.

tufflitestudios, once you feel comfortable after talking with your doc, (who will likely say it is fine, just don't blast away) then try for something that does lay flat, SR60's are really a nice inexpensive set to get the job done!
 

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