Headphone graphs
Jan 2, 2012 at 7:17 AM Post #2 of 11

stv014

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http://www.geocities.jp/ryumatsuba/review.html
 
A few more random ones:
 
http://www.head-fi.org/t/409732/some-more-frequency-response-graphs
http://www.stereo.ru/test.php?article_id=146&tree_id_1=67
http://www.stereo.ru/test.php?article_id=85&tree_id_1=67
http://www.stereo.ru/test.php?article_id=65&tree_id_1=67
http://www.stereo.ru/test.php?article_id=38&tree_id_1=67
http://www.stereo.ru/test.php?article_id=21&tree_id_1=67
 
 
Jan 2, 2012 at 8:19 AM Post #3 of 11

liamstrain

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Quote:
http://www.geocities.jp/ryumatsuba/review.html
 



All of this person's graphs show headphones as performing much flatter than other graphs of the same phones ... I cannot read japanese, so I do not know the methodology, but something seems off. 
 
Jan 2, 2012 at 8:41 AM Post #4 of 11

stv014

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Quote:
All of this person's graphs show headphones as performing much flatter than other graphs of the same phones ... I cannot read japanese, so I do not know the methodology, but something seems off. 


It is true that many graphs look suspicious and likely wrong (although the same unfortunately also applies to other sites with headphone graphs as well), note especially the frequency response shown for the Sony XB700. However, the vertical scale of these graphs is deceptive, since one line is 20 dB, so what may look flat at first, could actually be significantly colored.
 
 
Jan 3, 2012 at 6:34 AM Post #5 of 11

markanini

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Awesome!

I've noted the differences as between measurements of the same 'phones well. Could be down to sample variance, fit, shape of the manekin and differences in the correction curve of raw data. I know Innerfidelity uses a different curve than most where flat would mainly be +3dB at 1000Hz on a typical Diffuse-field corrected curve and a few smaller dips.

Found a few more here:
http://www.ixbt.com/ds/archive/
http://www.ixbt.com/pa/archive/
 
Jan 6, 2012 at 3:43 PM Post #8 of 11

miceblue

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I didn't want to start a new thread, and my comment isn't 100% on track with the other comments in this thread, but I have a question regarding the headphone graphs.
 
From HeadRoom, I was reading some of the explanations given as to how to interpret such graphs. I then went to Innerfidelity and downloaded some of the graphs that Tyll compiled:

 

 
 

 

 
 
From my interpretations of these graphs, which is probably incorrect but is part of the reason why I'm posting this, it looks as if the HD650's can compare to the Beats Pro. The impulse response looks cleaner on the Pros; the 300 Hz square wave for the Pro and HD650 have a similar-looking response (although the first oscillation on the Pro is larger in amplitude); the 30 Hz square wave for the Pro is more flat/linear than the HD650's and has a smaller initial spike (I'm not sure what that means).
 
Just from these graphs alone, it seems as if the Pros can compare with the HD650's. I haven't heard the HD650's myself so I cannot comment on its sound signature, but I am quite certain that people around Head-Fi would recommend the HD650's over the Beats Pro for sound quality.
 
Can anyone enlighten me as to what exactly these graphs mean? If the graphs are similar, does that mean anything?
 
Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.
 
 
Jan 6, 2012 at 4:21 PM Post #9 of 11

maverickronin

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Quote:
From my interpretations of these graphs, which is probably incorrect but is part of the reason why I'm posting this, it looks as if the HD650's can compare to the Beats Pro. The impulse response looks cleaner on the Pros; the 300 Hz square wave for the Pro and HD650 have a similar-looking response (although the first oscillation on the Pro is larger in amplitude); the 30 Hz square wave for the Pro is more flat/linear than the HD650's and has a smaller initial spike (I'm not sure what that means).
 
Just from these graphs alone, it seems as if the Pros can compare with the HD650's. I haven't heard the HD650's myself so I cannot comment on its sound signature, but I am quite certain that people around Head-Fi would recommend the HD650's over the Beats Pro for sound quality.
 
Can anyone enlighten me as to what exactly these graphs mean? If the graphs are similar, does that mean anything?
 
Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.


I've never heard the Beats Pro but they do measure fairly well.  I used to own the HD650 and liked the quiet a bit though.
 
They have similar FR and 30Hz square waves but that's about it.  The HD650s have much lower levels of distortion throughout the majority of the spectrum.  The 300Hz square wave shows the Pro's drivers have a short period of high amplitude ringing and that is corroborated by the impulse response.  The HD650s appear to ring for a slightly longer period of time but at a much lower amplitude relative to the initial response which will be less audible as than the behavior the Pros exhibit.
 
 
Jan 6, 2012 at 4:47 PM Post #10 of 11

miceblue

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Quote:
I've never heard the Beats Pro but they do measure fairly well.  I used to own the HD650 and liked the quiet a bit though.
 
They have similar FR and 30Hz square waves but that's about it.  The HD650s have much lower levels of distortion throughout the majority of the spectrum.  The 300Hz square wave shows the Pro's drivers have a short period of high amplitude ringing and that is corroborated by the impulse response.  The HD650s appear to ring for a slightly longer period of time but at a much lower amplitude relative to the initial response which will be less audible as than the behavior the Pros exhibit.
 


Does that longer ringing time factor in to how a headphone can sound 'fast' or 'slow'? From the SRH940 thread, I think someone mentioned that the HD650's are 'slow.'
 
Also, regarding the differences in the left/right drivers, are the different responses for the Beats Pro due to the 'single-entry' cable as opposed to the HD650's 'double-entry' cable connection?
 
 
Jan 6, 2012 at 6:24 PM Post #11 of 11

maverickronin

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Quote:
Does that longer ringing time factor in to how a headphone can sound 'fast' or 'slow'? From the SRH940 thread, I think someone mentioned that the HD650's are 'slow.'
 
Also, regarding the differences in the left/right drivers, are the different responses for the Beats Pro due to the 'single-entry' cable as opposed to the HD650's 'double-entry' cable connection?


1) Maybe.  They didn't really sound "slow" to me though.  Some people say that other things with a lot more ringing are supposed to be blazing fast though.
 
2) No, not at all.  The driver matching is all about manufacturing tolerances and testing at the factory.
 

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