Has anyone ever...
Jul 11, 2008 at 9:11 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 10

M3NTAL

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Taken one RCA interconnect from one brand/material and plugged it from source to amplifier and taken another RCA interconnect from another brand/material and plugged it from source to amplifier in the remaining channel - from there done a study on the sound ?

I hear terms like "more extended" "less grainy" "more detailed" which I would think you could pick up in this experiment

Thinks like "soundstage" and things that have to do with perceptions created by both ears working together would not be able to be tested with this though.
 
Jul 11, 2008 at 1:17 PM Post #2 of 10

webbie64

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Yeah, sure.

Gotta be running a strictly mono signal through the setup and also try it with the headphones on the wrong ears as well as the correct ears (our ears are not identical so there can be different perceptions of the sound in each one
wink.gif
).

It can be an interesting experiment, particularly the more different the sound produced by the respective ICs is.

And, as you state, some components of the sound require a true stereo image through the whole IC, trying one IC at a time.

Quote:

Originally Posted by M3NTAL /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Taken one RCA interconnect from one brand/material and plugged it from source to amplifier and taken another RCA interconnect from another brand/material and plugged it from source to amplifier in the remaining channel - from there done a study on the sound ?

I hear terms like "more extended" "less grainy" "more detailed" which I would think you could pick up in this experiment

Thinks like "soundstage" and things that have to do with perceptions created by both ears working together would not be able to be tested with this though.



 
Jul 11, 2008 at 4:05 PM Post #3 of 10

Golden Monkey

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I've tried that, and with mono recordings, but it is SO hard to get any useful info out of doing this. More often than not, you won't hear a radical difference at all, or you'll give yourself an instant headache. It may not be easier to switch cables in and out, but it gives you a truer sense of what each set is actually doing.
 
Jul 11, 2008 at 5:05 PM Post #4 of 10

bigshot

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Quote:

Originally Posted by M3NTAL /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Taken one RCA interconnect from one brand/material and plugged it from source to amplifier and taken another RCA interconnect from another brand/material and plugged it from source to amplifier in the remaining channel - from there done a study on the sound ?


That's a good way to detect defective cables. There shouldn't be any difference between the two channels. But remember to flop channels once in a while. There's more difference between our two ears than there is between two properly designed and built cables.

See ya
Steve
 

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