For studio monitoring, wich headphone should I get?
Sep 7, 2011 at 12:07 PM Post #16 of 33

lejaz

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What are you comparing them too? Did you compare them to other 'flat' studio monitor headphones or speakers? Maybe you just prefer bright. Nothing wrong with that, but compared to other 'flat' studio monitor headphones they are definitely bright....with no eq added of course. You'll find lots of folks remark on their brightness in the upper mids if you do a forum search, while probably an equal number find them neutral. It's always like that....people hear differently..
 
Quote:
V6 is neutral. Not bright at all like a Shure



Same as above.
 
 
Actually, it's a little dark to me. But that's my slightly dark receiver playing at them.
 
You guys need to switch off the EQ once and a while. What makes the V6 sound bright is the more forward soundstage over the AKG. The highs are placed forward as the bass is more in the soundstage with the mids working in between. That's why you hear the highs more.
 
To me, I don't see much of the mids. For some reason my ears have a difficult time picking up them like a balanced can.
 



 
 
Sep 7, 2011 at 12:08 PM Post #17 of 33

Lurkumaural

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Quote:
I dont know why but the sony V6 looks a bit cheap for me...


I know what you mean, but trust me, they are very durable.  I've put my 7506 through hell.  Short of the known enemies of headphones, like axes and fire, they'll stand up to a lot.
 
In general I think that if you're taking sound engineering courses, most if not all of the cans mentioned are good enough.  The M40 is easily not in the same league as the rest, but I do think it may still satisfy you unless you let the head-fier in you get picky. 
 
Data and anecdote say the 7506 are peaky, but I used to use them day and night without feeling the particular fatigue of treble peaks, so that's where I'm coming from in suggesting that you can just grab whatever and go.  These are all studio cans, and there will always be people who say they use them to great effect.  And they're not wrong.
 
Every headphone mentioned in this thread has a characteristic sound.  A couple, like the Sony and the Beyer, have been described as bassy.  I believe the M50 has been described as both bassy and bass light.  If you're anything like me, you're gonna go nuts picking one.  What they sound like when you first listen to them is probably not as important as how well you get to know them and make them your ears (unless they're terrible on you).
 
I know little about hammers except that they're useful for driving nails and stuff.  And I know how to use one to great effect.  But to pick one out of the many that are different in a few ways, when fans of one model or another will try to lend their subjectivity, is an exercise in vanity.  Even people who don't have an agenda per se will tell you, "This hammer B is great for very long nails, but for short nails that you can sink in two strokes you'll want an angle more like hammer C."  You can just pick up a hammer.  If it's not a bad one, you will get your work done.
 
I'm gonna be the guy who recommends something cheap.  I already know I like the V6, and while I haven't heard the M40fs, I've always wanted to give it a spin.  I'm one of those people who says that if you're still learning how to do something, cheap tools are part of the experience.  Not a masochistic type of experience IMO but more of a fundamentals-first thing.  My mom hates that I do this.  But she grew up having people just give her stuff.  I didn't.
 
For my collection I would like to have one of SRH940, K271, or KNS-8400 to put into heavy use because I've heard such great things about them that make me want to really give them a workout.  And I've not read a bad thing about the GMP, so obviously I'm quite intrigued.  But that's the same vanity that I believe sometimes gets in the way of audio work.
 
You mentioned comfort.  I'd really like to hear owners of these cans compare them from a wearability standpoint.  The Beyer looks like a winner.  As does the 940, though some people got scared when the press pics showed bumps on the headband.  The 8400 with memory foam pads sounds lovely, but may be like a rubber jumpsuit inside after half a day.  Like I said, hopefully someone can offer some experience with long-session use.
 
What's your current coursework?  Studio?  Live music?  EFP?
 
 
Sep 7, 2011 at 12:48 PM Post #18 of 33

extrabigmehdi

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lurkumaural /img/forum/go_quote.gif
 
 As does the 940, though some people got scared when the press pics showed bumps on the headband. 
 

Currently using the srh940.  I don't feel the headband at all, even with my short haircut. The earpads apply a moderate clamping force around my ear, that's  the main reason I  can't completly forget that I'm wearing a headphone.
 
Sep 7, 2011 at 1:54 PM Post #19 of 33

colmustard

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I didn't find the 595's neutral at all, they have a very forward midrange and I thought the treble was a little lacking. However the bass was spot on.
 
I would consider the dt880 250 ohm to be the most neutral headphone's I've ever heard. Not to mention beyer's are the comfort king
 
Sep 7, 2011 at 2:11 PM Post #20 of 33

extrabigmehdi

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Quote:
I didn't find the 595's neutral at all, they have a very forward midrange and I thought the treble was a little lacking. However the bass was spot on.

Perhaps bass quantity, but not the quality.  Yeah the midrange might seem forward, I  think it's because it's the best they have to offer.  I rather have an emphasis on the midrange, than the bass or the trebble, but that's just me.
 
Sep 7, 2011 at 7:14 PM Post #21 of 33

LFF

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I would suggest you look into the following headphones:
 
Senn HD598/600
Fischer Audio FA-003
A modded Fostex T50RP
 
Sep 7, 2011 at 8:50 PM Post #22 of 33

RexAeterna

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Sony v6 is bright! it makes most of the music I listen to sound noticeably bright and harsh in the upper mids compared to the k240DF and the hd580....both generally considered 'flat' and neutral. Haven't heard the Shures, but if I needed closed I'd probably go for those....or the GMP's.


the 240df's can be very bright on certain tracks from my experience. but maybe it's just me. my hearing is probably more sensitive in the upper highs compared to other people maybe. seems beyer dt48A or DT48S not mentioned here as well. other headphone that will work pretty well out of low powered devices are the pioneer monitor 10. they are heavy and big so not exactly portable but do get better with better amplification. they do have really amazing extension at both ends and you will not be missing any part of the frequency spectrum with them. they about as completely flat from what they sound like to me and very comparable to my DF's and sound every bit as accurate. my current favorite right next to my 240DF's.

if you can snag up of pair of pioneer monitor 10's you will not be disappointed. they do have the 10R out which is more consumer friendly but don't know how they compare to the original pioneer monitor 10's. usually newer update models made for more today's consumer use is not as good as the original model that was designed around professional equipment.
 
Sep 7, 2011 at 9:12 PM Post #23 of 33

Acix

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The recorded materials can be sounds bright as well, for example...Frank Sinatra can sound great on the HD-580/650, but the other 90% of the music on the same system it  sounds dark and veil. So, for people that listen exclusive to Frank Sinatra, or other big band staff. most of the hps can sounds on the bright side.  
 
Sep 8, 2011 at 1:46 AM Post #24 of 33

lejaz

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Do you mean to say that the many thousands ...or millions...of folks who have enjoyed the hd6X0/580 over the years only listened to Frank Sinatra albums or bright sounding CD's? I guess they all had the same very limited music collection :wink:. A lot of the Sinatra albums that I've heard are far from bright. IMO, the dt48 and the 240DF win the battle for most 'true to life'. But, I think the disagreements on head-fi often boil down to subjective preference. When we battle over which headphone is too bright or dark it's almost like arguing whether chocolate is better than vanilla. A guy I met online who mastered a lot of successful albums swears by the hd650. I thought they were supposed to be too dark and veiled :wink: In a shoot out of headphones for mixing in Sound On Sound magazine the hd650 won...and the dt880 was a close runner up, if I remember correctly.... or maybe it was the other way around. If anyone's interested in reading it, you can probably find it online if you search for it.
Quote:
The recorded materials can be sounds bright as well, for example...Frank Sinatra can sound great on the HD-580/650, but the other 90% of the music on the same system it  sounds dark and veil. So, for people that listen exclusive to Frank Sinatra, or other big band staff. most of the hps can sounds on the bright side.  


 
 
 
Sep 8, 2011 at 1:54 AM Post #25 of 33

LFF

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Quote:
Do you mean to say that the many thousands ...or millions...of folks who have enjoyed the hd6X0/580 over the years only listened to Frank Sinatra albums or bright sounding CD's? I guess they all had the same very limited music collection, lol. A lot of the Sinatra albums that I've heard are far from bright.

 


 
It depends how you heard those Frank Sinatra albums. The CD's are definitely bright. If you don't think so, something in your playback chain is off. The original LP's are warm and natural sounding most of the time.
 
Sep 8, 2011 at 1:59 AM Post #26 of 33

lejaz

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A lot of the stuff I heard from the late 50's and early 60's was far from bright if I recall correctly. Could be my memory playing tricks on me I guess, but it was not nearly as bright as the 'Live at the Sands' album from the mid 60's...now THAT was bright. The older stuff I heard was the Capitol recordings, I think....definitely on the warm side. .
Quote:
 
It depends how you heard those Frank Sinatra albums. The CD's are definitely bright. If you don't think so, something in your playback chain is off. The original LP's are warm and natural sounding most of the time.



 
 
Sep 8, 2011 at 2:05 AM Post #27 of 33

lejaz

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@LFF, those were the Sinatra on Capitol CD's vol.1 and II from the late 50's and early 60's that I listened to.  Pretty warm and laid back sounding if I recall correctly
 
Sep 8, 2011 at 2:25 AM Post #28 of 33

LFF

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Quote:
@LFF, those were the Sinatra on Capitol CD's vol.1 and II from the late 50's and early 60's that I listened to.  Pretty warm and laid back sounding if I recall correctly



Hmmm...don't really know which CD's you are talking about...
 
However, if you want to hear Sinatra come back to life...listen to this CD:
 

 
Sep 8, 2011 at 5:29 AM Post #29 of 33

Acix

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Quote:
A lot of the stuff I heard from the late 50's and early 60's was far from bright if I recall correctly. Could be my memory playing tricks on me I guess, but it was not nearly as bright as the 'Live at the Sands' album from the mid 60's...now THAT was bright. The older stuff I heard was the Capitol recordings, I think....definitely on the warm side. .


 



...and again, it's depend on what system do you listen on.
 
EDIT: Keep us in the loop, lejaz!
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Sep 8, 2011 at 5:51 AM Post #30 of 33

brooce

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I have the Sony MDR-V6; it is far from neutral. It is also rubbish for music-listening in my opinion.
 
I have the DT770 Pro (250ohm). It is farrrrrrr closer to neutral than the V6.
To even compare these two is a disservice to common sense and to your ears.
 
The advantage with the V6 is it is EASY to drive; it can be hooked up to almost anything and get ear-piercing volume from it. I would not rank it high in comfort, value or neutrality; it is very commonly used for monitoring (great for video work though, in my opinion...and easier to travel with than the DT770 Pro).
 
The DT770 Pro is also far harder to drive; you will not get adequate volume form it from many sources, but many quality 'phones are in the same boat.
Never tried the 80ohm version though...can't speak about it.
 
 
 

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