Equal Loudness EQ Calibration Tones for Foobar2000 & Winamp
Jan 21, 2013 at 8:23 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 7

Seidhepriest

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This is something concocted for tuning speakers and headphones for accurate playback. This is similar to the New South Wales' University page. But set up to match Foobar2000 & Winamp (+SuperEQ from Naoki Shibata) EQ bands.
 
Ideally this post would be stickied.
 
There're two versions, one for Foobar2000, another for Winamp, which also installs the SuperEQ from Naoki Shibata. This is with permission from Naoki Shibata himself.
 
The basic concept is, you listen to sine wave tones and adjust the EQ bands to match average loudness of each band until they all are at similar loudness. Thus you compensate for the speakers/headphones' irregular frequency response.
 
Properly done, this little setup will improve clarity and resolution.
 
Equal Loudness EQ Calibration Tones for Foobar2000 (for the Shibatch SuperEQ built into F2K);
 
Equal Loudness EQ Calibration Tones for Winamp, with Shibatch Superequaliser included.
 
Jan 22, 2013 at 6:08 PM Post #4 of 7

Seidhepriest

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Ehm what? F2K/Shibata EQ only does +20/-20 dB... And anyway what sub will actually allow you to boost 20 Hz by 50 dB?
 
Jan 22, 2013 at 8:51 PM Post #5 of 7

chewy4

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I'm guessing that I'm misinterpreting the program, I'm having a bit of trouble downloading it at the moment so I can't see it for myself.
 
What I thought you had was something like sinegen but rather than have the different frequencies at the same volume, make them boosted or reduced to match the equal loudness curve. So that you can actually calibrate to the dips in your headphones/speakers without mistaking your dips in hearing for them. So if a 1kHz sine wave was at 40dB, the 20Hz wave would be at about 100dB.
 
Jan 22, 2013 at 9:03 PM Post #6 of 7

Seidhepriest

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SIGH. Are you sure you're not mixing things up? The way the Foobar/SuperEQ works is by +20/-20 dB interval max., but even the worst deviations in small speaker response are about 18 dB max. Nobody measures relative levels in positive dB either, negative dB is the norm (in digital audio especially, the only "positive" number is +0 dB).
 
Here's an example Foobar EQ for cheap small USB speakers:
 
Cheapo-EQ.png

 
As you can see, this is really a boost for all frequencies outside midrange pretty much, but auto-levelled the EQ actually depresses the boost to be below 0 dB.
 
AH-D310-EQ.png

 
- This is the EQ for Denon AH-D310, it's a fairly straight/lucky sample.
 
MA-10-EQ.png

 
- EQ for Roland MA-10 speakers. This is meant to produce a straight frequency response.
 
This is what the test produces, it's a set of sine waves at the EQ bands' frequencies. By adjusting the relative levels of the sine waves to be equally loud, you calibrate the speakers/headphones to a straight frequency response. So really these graphs are a fair approximation of devices' frequency responses too, just flip them vertically.
 
Mar 21, 2013 at 6:36 AM Post #7 of 7

Joe Bloggs

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It sounds like you're not even aware of the problem he was discussing.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equal-loudness_contour

Also using pure tones for calibration neglects the fact that each EQ band covers a *band* of frequencies and the response of the system can vary wildly within one band, making a pure tone at the center frwquency unrepresentative of the whole band.

I made these new test sounds to address these two shortcomings (well actually I started that thread before seeing this one)
http://www.head-fi.org/t/656208/calibrating-graphic-eqs-the-easy-way
 

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