Eggheads...Help! Suggestions for entry level electronics text.
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I just got laid off. My job title is Senior Engineering Technician, but most of my experience and training has been in mechanics. I am pretty weak in electronics.

Can you suggest any really good or great electronics texts/books that are geared toward the technician level? (read sans Calculus)

Thank you!
 
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eric343

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The Art of Electronics, by Winfield and Hill. $73 at Amazon.com...

Very little math (for an electronics book), great reading on damn near everything electronics-related, although the digital/computer section is a bit old.
 
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AoE is a little stiff for a rank beginner. It is indeed light on the math and relatively accessible as electronics texts go. No doubt, it's a great book to have, but if you're scared by the price and the weight of the thing, my Fixated friend, get _Practical Electronics for Inventors_. It's yet more accessible than AoE, yet not watered down to the point of unusability.

If you get through Practical and still want more, AoE is the obvious next step.

If, like me, you've absorbed a lot of basic electronics (Ohm's law, the basic concepts behind electronic parts, etc.) over the years of playing with other things, you can jump straight to AoE. If you only want one book and are willing to work harder at first, also get AoE.
 
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yet another example of coolness in the industry:

http://www.kimber.com/atomic-struct/tablecont.htm

its being added to on a continuous basis and isn't nearly complete yet, but you can get all the info you need and its 100% free of charge.

regards,
carlo.
 
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tangent

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Ooh, thanks for the indirect reminder, carlo. There's another set of free electronics texts out there:

http://www.ibiblio.org/obp/electricCircuits/

This set is like Open Source software: started and mostly written by one guy, but many others have contributed small bits to it so that it's now farther along than if it was just one guy's labor of love. It won't dethrone AoE, but it's not bad for free.
 
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bookpool.com has a much better price on art of electronics. also, if you have any college bookstores in your area, check there for a used copy. you can usually fine a mint condition, yet used copy, under various physics and engineering classes for about 50 dollars.
 
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Great suggestions everyone. I think that I am leaning toward the Art of Electronics. Does it contain the complex math that some other fundamental EE texts thrash you with (differential equations)? I am still about a year away from meeting the necessary prerequisites of Calculus and upper division physics in college to allow me to understand typical EE technical literature/texts -- and I may never get to that level. My concern is that the reading will be over my head.

Thank you.
 
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I've never taken any electrical engineering courses before, but I have found Art of Electronics to be very clear and easy to read. Also, if you are still apprehensive about the book, go to a local book store and sit down with a copy for a good 20-30 minutes. Read some random chapters that interest you. This is the best way to determine if the book is right for you.

brian
 
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Radio Shack has several books for beginners in electronics. You should go and check them out.

Forrest M. Mims III's "Getting Started in Electronics" is a good booklet for newbies.
 
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