Dremel for Case Work
Jan 27, 2009 at 11:55 AM Post #16 of 25

kansei

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Heady /img/forum/go_quote.gif
How does one use a dremel to cut a square hole? Would like to learn this.


I have a package of fiberglass cutting wheels for my Dremel. You can also buy a diamond cutting wheel for the Dremel, in case you keep wearing through the fiberglass cutting wheels.
Cutting Wheels | ToolBarn.com

There are also other accessories that will help you cut things with your Dremel.
Rotary Tool Accessories | ToolBarn.com
 
Jan 27, 2009 at 12:03 PM Post #17 of 25

MisterX

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Diamond wheels are for cutting masonry, not metals.
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Jan 27, 2009 at 2:18 PM Post #18 of 25

Heady

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Quote:

Originally Posted by kansei /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I have a package of fiberglass cutting wheels for my Dremel. You can also buy a diamond cutting wheel for the Dremel, in case you keep wearing through the fiberglass cutting wheels.
Cutting Wheels | ToolBarn.com

There are also other accessories that will help you cut things with your Dremel.
Rotary Tool Accessories | ToolBarn.com



Thanks, so the fibreglass cutting wheels work fine for cutting aluminium?
 
Jan 27, 2009 at 7:16 PM Post #19 of 25

kansei

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Heady /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Thanks, so the fibreglass cutting wheels work fine for cutting aluminium?


I used them to cut PCB material (copper-clad board) and tin. I see no reason why it would not work on aluminum.
 
Jan 27, 2009 at 8:17 PM Post #21 of 25

pabbi1

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Heady /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Thanks, so the fibreglass cutting wheels work fine for cutting aluminium?


Yes, and steel. I really would rather use something else to cut out IEC openings, but the Dremel gives me the greatest flexibility, and least risk. I must also recommend a cheap $13 face shield, as flying fiberglass or sand (the standard cutting wheels) is a bit risky.
 
Jan 28, 2009 at 4:46 AM Post #22 of 25

Heady

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Quote:

Originally Posted by pabbi1 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Yes, and steel. I really would rather use something else to cut out IEC openings, but the Dremel gives me the greatest flexibility, and least risk. I must also recommend a cheap $13 face shield, as flying fiberglass or sand (the standard cutting wheels) is a bit risky.


I was a dentist in a previous life and used to cut plastic and wires with rotary disks but never used fibreglass disks before. Was too scared to try it to cut square or rectangular cut-outs. I don't like pain, especially from metal bits flying into my face.
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Jan 28, 2009 at 11:52 AM Post #23 of 25

kansei

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Heady /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I was a dentist in a previous life and used to cut plastic and wires with rotary disks but never used fibreglass disks before. Was too scared to try it to cut square or rectangular cut-outs. I don't like pain, especially from metal bits flying into my face.
tongue.gif



I just cut two square holes on a metal box (steel, I guess) with a fiberglass disk. Be prepared for showers of sparks.
 
Jan 28, 2009 at 10:36 PM Post #24 of 25

TimmyMac

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Quote:

Originally Posted by pabbi1 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Yes, and steel. I really would rather use something else to cut out IEC openings, but the Dremel gives me the greatest flexibility, and least risk. I must also recommend a cheap $13 face shield, as flying fiberglass or sand (the standard cutting wheels) is a bit risky.


As long as you keep your face out of the plane of the disk you're fine - everything flies tangentially from where it was wehn it 'sploded
 
Jan 28, 2009 at 11:26 PM Post #25 of 25

DKJones96

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For around $100 and a trip to harbor freight you can get a drill press and a set of 3 stepped bits. It's amazing how much easier a drill press, even a cheap one, makes DIY work.

For around $200-250 you can get pretty much everything you'll ever need for case work. Bench grinder, corded drill, drill press, stepped bits, a set of regular bits, hole saws, set of punches, hammer, dremel with bits, and a caliper.

A few other things like taps aren't a bad idea but I even have a mini lathe in my apartment for all my DIY stuff. Just depends on how much you plan on doing.
 

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