Dremel for Case Work
Jan 25, 2009 at 11:38 PM Post #2 of 25

-=Germania=-

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Sep 25, 2005
Posts
3,008
Likes
12
Some materials need high speed.

Power drills are unweildly for detail work. Plus, the amount of tips for dremels makes it a true multitasker.

Drill presses are better than the other options most of the time.

Stepped drill bits are the bees knees when it comes to drilling aluminum when I have used them. Made my life easier, especially with a drill press.
 
Jan 25, 2009 at 11:38 PM Post #3 of 25

Nemo de Monet

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Oct 15, 2008
Posts
278
Likes
12
A power drill is all fine and dandy if you want to make round holes.
smily_headphones1.gif


I've never bothered with step bits; my philosophy is "if you can't put a hole in it with a $10 set of hole saws, it wasn't meant to have a hole in it".

IMO, Dremels are popular with people because they're the immediately obvious choice for putting holes in most things, and the tool-of-last-resort for putting holes in things that a panel-nibbler can't/won't cut.

There might also be that "a Dremel is a hobby tool, but heaven forbid I buy a real drill, lest people think I know how to fix stuff" thing going on, as well.
biggrin.gif
 
Jan 25, 2009 at 11:41 PM Post #4 of 25

tintin47

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Oct 16, 2008
Posts
2,007
Likes
14
I have a nice "real" drill and a lot of bits, but half of the time I need to use it, I find myself thinking "man this would be easier with a dremel." Especially casework.
 
Jan 25, 2009 at 11:52 PM Post #5 of 25

csroc

500+ Head-Fier
Joined
Dec 13, 2008
Posts
689
Likes
0
I did the hole work for my Millet Starving Student with a standard power drill, a set of drill bits and a stepped drill bit. I was a bit rusty with a stepped bit and wound up with one hole being a small bit bigger than I needed when I didn't pull off soon enough but it still worked out just fine. I used a small round file for making adjustments where needed. All in all though it made working with the aluminum box quite a bit easier although I still would have preferred using a drill press (I just got bored and decided to do it myself at home rather than bug some people I know to see if I could use their presses).

I personally would not want to use a dremel for such things because I find it would be harder to control, steady or guide than a drill. I have seen a dremel press contraption which might make it a decent tool for case work but I don't know how big of a hole you can realistically cut with a single pass with a dremel.
 
Jan 26, 2009 at 1:27 AM Post #6 of 25

TimmyMac

500+ Head-Fier
Joined
May 11, 2006
Posts
539
Likes
10
Dremels are great for ruining the finish on your nice anodized aluminum front panel
confused_face.gif


Seriously though, they're alright for that last 10% when you need to make a square hole for something like an IEC input module.

Step drill bits are absolutely amazing and since I bought one for building by Bijou (needed 7/8" holes in heavy gauge steel...) I've found countless uses for it. Amazing for creating recessed jacks and whatnot in wood where you need a hole that's a given size at the front but gets bigger to accommodate the part as the hole goes back.
 
Jan 26, 2009 at 3:03 AM Post #9 of 25

Ech0

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Mar 6, 2007
Posts
294
Likes
11
The only thing I use a Dremel for re: casework is to help grind out some of the rough spots when I'm making a square or rectangular hole fininshing out w/a file. Drill press w/stepped bit for the rest. Erwin's are kinda expensive but they last longer and make a cleaner hole, imo.
 
Jan 26, 2009 at 4:08 AM Post #11 of 25

Uncle Erik

Uncle Exotic
Joined
Mar 18, 2006
Posts
22,596
Likes
512
My corded powe drill does the heavy work, but I clean up with a Dremel. The flexible shaft attachment really helps got into tight spaces, too. But for final finish work on aluminum, nothing beats a set of files and some sandpaper.
 
Jan 26, 2009 at 5:42 AM Post #12 of 25

bhjazz

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Dec 29, 2003
Posts
1,513
Likes
11
Quote:

Originally Posted by Punnisher /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Dremels are great when you don't have the right tool for the job.


Just like a hammer!

Quote:

Originally Posted by Uncle Erik /img/forum/go_quote.gif
My corded power drill does the heavy work, but I clean up with a Dremel.


That's what I do as well. Sometimes the parts don't fit like I think they can, so rounding out holes with a Dremel can work well. But only if I can be sure that any wayward grinding can be properly covered by the parts (washers around isolated RCA jacks, etc.)
 
Jan 26, 2009 at 3:42 PM Post #13 of 25

KT88

500+ Head-Fier
Joined
Nov 7, 2004
Posts
948
Likes
24
there's the right toll for every job. Just like you wont use a router to do the finish on a wooded part, you don't use a power drill or fine details.

I own a Dremel, a regular drill, and a standing drill (+ a few others). While compared to the regular drill, the Dremel was very accurate, I hardly use it anymore since I got the standing drill, its very accurate, just for small details, and round cuts/traces.
 
Jan 27, 2009 at 8:02 AM Post #15 of 25

Heady

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Jul 8, 2004
Posts
213
Likes
10
Quote:

Originally Posted by compuryan /img/forum/go_quote.gif
They're great for smoothing edges. And cutting square holes. And any place a drill doesn't easily fit. Very handy little tool.


How does one use a dremel to cut a square hole? Would like to learn this.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top