Do IEMs just naturally have more bass than full-sizes?
Dec 23, 2009 at 2:58 AM Post #3 of 17

logwed

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Yes, because marshmallows are indicative of all IEMs >_>. That's like saying "My $5 Koss throw-aways are hissy. Do all supra-aurals (Ed8 included) hiss more than full-sizes?"
 
Dec 23, 2009 at 2:59 AM Post #4 of 17

donovansmith

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IEMs are made for portable use and portable users tend to value bass a lot more than someone listening at home might. Dynamic IEMs tend to be tuned to have a bit more bass response. Balanced armature IEMs, due to the nature of the drivers, often tend to have less bass response than average full-size headphones. Although they tend to have much more isolation than dynamic IEMs, too.
 
Dec 23, 2009 at 3:33 AM Post #5 of 17

RichieLitt

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Quote:

Originally Posted by logwed /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Yes, because marshmallows are indicative of all IEMs >_>. That's like saying "My $5 Koss throw-aways are hissy. Do all supra-aurals (Ed8 included) hiss more than full-sizes?"


I just thought because they're further into the ear canal, the bass would be heard more prominently. I dunno.
 
Dec 23, 2009 at 3:36 AM Post #6 of 17

logwed

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I think that humans do more easily perceive bass if the source is closer to the ear, but I think that there is compensation because there are IEMs that are valued for their neutrality, like the JH13Pros. I think that the bass hump is smaller in IEMs to compensate for the greater perception of bass (check Headroom's graphs to be sure).
 
Dec 23, 2009 at 3:45 AM Post #7 of 17

Head_case

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Quote:

Originally Posted by RichieLitt /img/forum/go_quote.gif
My JVC marshmallows have more bass than my HFI 780s...


Isn't this a sure way to self-induce hearing loss?
confused.gif


From what I recall, sound intensity is inversely proportional to distance (of the source). By reducing the distance to the auditory components of the ear, the fine hairs of the ear which sense motion, get a full blast from the JVC marshmallows.

This can't be comfortable listening for the delicate ear apparatus?
 
Dec 23, 2009 at 3:47 AM Post #8 of 17

semisight

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I don't think it's a matter of being closer to the ear, but rather in the ear. Part of hearing bass is feeling it (like when you go to a party and the DJ has the bass way way up so that the floor is almost vibrating).

EDIT: Head_case, it is true that sound level is inversely proportional to the square of the distance. But if the sound level is sufficiently low to begin with it's safe.
 
Dec 23, 2009 at 3:55 AM Post #9 of 17

jinp6301

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Quote:

Originally Posted by donovansmith /img/forum/go_quote.gif
IEMs are made for portable use and portable users tend to value bass a lot more than someone listening at home might. Dynamic IEMs tend to be tuned to have a bit more bass response. Balanced armature IEMs, due to the nature of the drivers, often tend to have less bass response than average full-size headphones. Although they tend to have much more isolation than dynamic IEMs, too.


I'm not sure if value is the right word

It seems to me that more bass is better in IEMs due to a lot of bass being lost due to environmental vibration (walking, in car, bus etc) so due to that, more bass (to an extent) is a better thing
 
Dec 23, 2009 at 4:08 AM Post #10 of 17

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Low frequency (bass) sounds require a large wavelength. (Because wavelength= 1/frequency. This is very difficult to do with small drivers like the ones in IEMs because they don't have a lot of room to vibrate back and forth. This is evident even in most speakers. Look at any stereo. The tweeter is a tiny little disk, the woofer is a medium-sized one, and the subwoofer is massive.
 
Dec 23, 2009 at 5:30 AM Post #11 of 17

Antony6555

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Quote:

Originally Posted by jinp6301 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I'm not sure if value is the right word

It seems to me that more bass is better in IEMs due to a lot of bass being lost due to environmental vibration (walking, in car, bus etc) so due to that, more bass (to an extent) is a better thing



If anything, iems should have more of a treble emphasis, because higher frequencies are much harder to hear in noisy environments than lower frequencies. Try listening to classical in a loud setting. Personally, I'd prefer my iems to be as accurate as possible, though.
 
Dec 23, 2009 at 5:37 AM Post #12 of 17

semisight

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Antony6555 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
If anything, iems should have more of a treble emphasis, because higher frequencies are much harder to hear in noisy environments than lower frequencies. Try listening to classical in a loud setting. Personally, I'd prefer my iems to be as accurate as possible, though.


I disagree. The isolation in my earphones allows me to hear most of the treble (even if I can't make out details as well), but the bass is washed out in any noisy environment, because there are so many ways for bass to reach your ears (lower frequencies are more omni-directional). Of course my SCL3s are bass light to begin with so that may be a factor.
 
Dec 23, 2009 at 6:01 AM Post #13 of 17

Menisk

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Quote:

Originally Posted by sonnybobiche /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Low frequency (bass) sounds require a large wavelength. (Because wavelength= 1/frequency. This is very difficult to do with small drivers like the ones in IEMs because they don't have a lot of room to vibrate back and forth. This is evident even in most speakers. Look at any stereo. The tweeter is a tiny little disk, the woofer is a medium-sized one, and the subwoofer is massive.


Don't know what makes you think wavelength = 1/frequency. That's wrong. speed of a wave = frequency * wavelength and so wavelength = speed of sound/frequency. The speed of sound is about 330ms and so the wavelength in metres is about 330/frequency.
 
Dec 23, 2009 at 6:28 AM Post #14 of 17

jinp6301

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Antony6555 /img/forum/go_quote.gif
If anything, iems should have more of a treble emphasis, because higher frequencies are much harder to hear in noisy environments than lower frequencies. Try listening to classical in a loud setting. Personally, I'd prefer my iems to be as accurate as possible, though.


Accurate in terms of frequency response?

If you want to go further, accurate at the driver or at the ear drum?
 
Dec 23, 2009 at 7:39 AM Post #15 of 17

Modifiedz

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Quote:

Originally Posted by RichieLitt /img/forum/go_quote.gif
My JVC marshmallows have more bass than my HFI 780s...


Maybe an amp will help out with the bass.
The bass coming from the JVC is also of higher Quality than the HFI too?
With IEM's your just going to be able to hear the audible spectrum of the low frequency sounds. The only part of your body that is going to actually feel the bass is the hair in your ears.
I have yet to find an IEM that actually vibrates when low freq. sound passes thru.
There are headphones that are capable of moving air like a mini-sub can.
 

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