Denon DL-103R And DL-103
Sep 15, 2009 at 11:20 PM Post #2 of 9

memepool

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Quote:

Originally Posted by TDL-speakers /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Do both these cartridges have a flat frequency response?


According to the measurements Denon publish but...
 
Sep 16, 2009 at 12:30 PM Post #4 of 9

ssportclay

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Quote:

Originally Posted by TDL-speakers /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Do both these cartridges have a flat frequency response?


I guess this is obvious but these cartridges do not have a flat frequency response nor do any others. What kind of sound are you looking for?
 
Sep 16, 2009 at 12:38 PM Post #5 of 9

memepool

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Quote:

Originally Posted by TDL-speakers /img/forum/go_quote.gif
b..bb....but??


Most reviews I have read show the R version with a slight lift in the higher frequencies, common to many modern carts, which gives it more bite in the treble compared to the 103 which rolls off gently.

I'm currently running in a DL-103 mounted to a Rega RB250 on a Vestax via a Naim 323 K stage in a NAC 32 and in this context it sounds pretty flat. It can sound a bit grainy in the highs but the base is excellent.

In a less forward sounding set up a 103-R may suit better.
 
Sep 16, 2009 at 1:43 PM Post #6 of 9

TDL-speakers

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Quote:

Originally Posted by ssportclay /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I guess this is obvious but these cartridges do not have a flat frequency response nor do any others. What kind of sound are you looking for?


My father has a Denon DL-103R and I like it very much. I'm thinking about getting one too, might just get the standard 103.

I just believed the 103 had a flat frequency response, because it was used in broadcast studios.

I know, it's a silly thought
redface.gif
 
Sep 16, 2009 at 2:45 PM Post #7 of 9

ssportclay

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Quote:

Originally Posted by TDL-speakers /img/forum/go_quote.gif
My father has a Denon DL-103R and I like it very much. I'm thinking about getting one too, might just get the standard 103.

I just believed the 103 had a flat frequency response, because it was used in broadcast studios.

I know, it's a silly thought
redface.gif



I believe the difference between the 2 cartridges is in the coils. The 103R uses larger gauge wiring with fewer turns which kicks up the higher frequencies at the expense of some gain.
 
Sep 16, 2009 at 7:04 PM Post #8 of 9

nikongod

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Loading the cartridge differently will also have HUGE effects on the topend. Loading a 103R the same way as a 103 could be a disaster of epic proportions.

IME it is best to experiment with different loads than what the MFR recommends, as I find they are generally starting points based on pseudo standard values. By pseudo standard I mean that there are no formal standards for MC cartridge loading, but everyone seems to use the same bunch whether they are right or not. With a little experimentation you can often do much better than what they recommend especially when matters of personal taste are considered.

You can make a 103 run shrill & peaky by loading it with 2-3k ohms resistive, or 80-160ohms on a transformer. Similarly loading a 103R with 20-45ohms resistive or about 9 on a transformer will roll it off FAST.
Quote:

The 103R uses larger gauge wiring with fewer turns which kicks up the higher frequencies at the expense of some gain.


I think you mean output voltage, not gain.

It is done to reduce coil impedance and inductance as well as the effective tip-mass of the cart. The coil impedance and inductance combine with the cable capacitance and input impedance of the phono-stage and form a tank circuit. A tank circuit is an electrical resonator at certain frequencies and causes truly horrific peaks in frequency response. By decreasing coil impedance and inductance these resonant frequencies are (hopefully) MUCH higher than the audio band where they are more easily controlled without effecting the audio band as much.
 

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