Denon D2000 Problems!
Aug 1, 2009 at 5:35 PM Post #31 of 35

ezzieyguywuf

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It is a miracle that she found them. She really is pretty amazing... And as of now I do not plan on using the loc-tite/epoxy route. I'm too afraid that this will permanently bond the screws in place and will dissallow future modification. Any other suggestions kind folk?
 
Aug 1, 2009 at 7:32 PM Post #32 of 35

moredes

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How 'bout contact cement (a.k.a., "rubber cement")? If it doesn't work, it's soft enough to remove with surgery tweezers. You'll have to set up the cans so they're assembled tightly while the glue dries, but that shouldn't be any problem.

My first instinct is to wonder why you're goin' round and round for more ideas--epoxy, locktite, wood shavings/toothpicks with glue--all of 'em are easy enough to test... It occurs to me that epoxy might be too hard to screw easily into if mixed incorrectly...on the other hand, you could mix it with "less" hardener. It should work just fine that way. It's easy enough to test--epoxy the hole on an oversized nut with a 'suitable' mixture of hardener and see if you can put a wood screw to it. Tone down your hardener as required. If you're afraid of not being able to remove the screws at a later date, test your methodology by filling the hole in a piece of scrap wood with whatever adhesive you wanna test--loctite, etc. and try it out.

This sure ain't a big problem, though it's certainly an inconvenience. Breathe.
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Aug 12, 2009 at 4:33 AM Post #34 of 35

drader

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This is the weak part of the Denon design. There are a couple ways to fix this. For the wooden cups you can get longer screws. Go to the hobby shop and look for #2 wood screws in 3/8 or 1/2". You can also get them with allen heads if you hate philips.

For the ring-to-driver problem you can dip a toothpick in epoxy and fatten up the stripped area, and the back. This works fine (ask me how I know). You can also go to the hobby shop and pick up some machine screws with nuts. Drill out the holes clean and epoxy the nuts to the backside (use an extra screw to hold the nut in place while the glue dries). I think the screws are 2-20, but don't quote me. Do this once and you'll never have to do it again, and can take them apart to your heart's content.

The heads were stripped by whoever did your mod, not the factory. Want to check? Is the damage from moving clockwise, or counterclockwise?
 
Aug 13, 2009 at 2:44 AM Post #35 of 35

ezzieyguywuf

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Quote:

Originally Posted by drader /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Want to check? Is the damage from moving clockwise, or counterclockwise?


Don't know what you mean there. I am pretty sure that the damage was caused by whoever did the mods. I didn't do the mods. Am I wrong in thinking some sort of compensation is due here? My fiancee does. I do too. Lemme know what you, the community thinks.

I'm leaning heavy towards the "glue" fixes as I'm calling them. These would use loktite or an equivalent to essentially glue the screw in place. I don't think reforming the threads by letting the glue partially set and then taking the screw out would work, mainly because the threads are so small and the pitch so fine.

After taking some measurements, I'm pretty damn sure that the screw is M2 and sorta confident that the threads are 0.40. I'm in the market for some M2 X 0.40 threaded inserts. Not much luck for some non-production ones.

I like the idea of gluing a bolt to the backside. My only concern there is that the screw wouldn't be long enough to reach it, since it's currently a blind hole and all.

Keep the suggestions coming guys!
 

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