definition of a headphone's "noise ceiling"
Feb 4, 2016 at 12:55 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 4

Special K

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I was reading reviews for the DT770 Pro 80 ohm on Amazon and came across this:
 
If you want the best "dedicated amp-less" listening, then the 80 ohms is the best balance between low noise ceiling for listening devices like the iPhone, but not low enough to introduce unwanted noise interference.
 
What exactly does this mean?  What does "low noise ceiling" mean in this context?  Does having lower impedance create more "unwanted noise interference"?
 
I've tried google and searching the head-fi forums but couldn't find a clear definition of the term.
 
Feb 4, 2016 at 5:34 PM Post #2 of 4

Raketen

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  I was reading reviews for the DT770 Pro 80 ohm on Amazon and came across this:
 
If you want the best "dedicated amp-less" listening, then the 80 ohms is the best balance between low noise ceiling for listening devices like the iPhone, but not low enough to introduce unwanted noise interference.
 
What exactly does this mean?  What does "low noise ceiling" mean in this context?  Does having lower impedance create more "unwanted noise interference"?
 
I've tried google and searching the head-fi forums but couldn't find a clear definition of the term.


I've heard the term "noise floor" before, but not noise ceiling. Maybe they mean sensitivity (as in dB/mW) i.e. a higher sensitivity can increase the audibility of low level noise (what "noise floor" is referring to from devices that produce some hissing, or operating noises etc...). Not sure how much impedance is a factor in that (think it has a lot to do with diaphragm material/ frequency response as well). The Beyer DT cans all have low-medium sensitivity IIRC, below <100dB/mW, so I don't imagine this would be a problem- but it does mean it takes more power to produce a given listening volume.
 

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