Classical recommendations please...
Apr 13, 2008 at 8:12 PM Post #16 of 23

Uncle Erik

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I'll second the recommendation of Arvo Part.

You might like Britten's Simple Symphony, as well.

Look into 20th century minimalist classical. 20th century has gotten something of a bad rep from some of the more experimental composers, but there's much from the 20th century that is hugely listenable and deserves a wider audience.
 
Apr 13, 2008 at 10:00 PM Post #17 of 23

majid

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Uncle Erik /img/forum/go_quote.gif
20th century has gotten something of a bad rep from some of the more experimental composers, but there's much from the 20th century that is hugely listenable and deserves a wider audience.


That's just because the crud hasn't decanted yet, unlike that of previous centuries.
 
Apr 15, 2008 at 3:20 AM Post #18 of 23

classicalguy

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I have one word for you. Mozart, Mozart, Mozart. Maybe Haydn too. This is a good place for you to start. I think people recommending romantic and modern music are missing the point of what you are looking for. Mozart piano concertos or chamber music would be a great place to start.
 
Apr 15, 2008 at 3:26 AM Post #19 of 23

TickTockMan

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Quote:

Originally Posted by classicalguy /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I have one word for you. Mozart, Mozart, Mozart. Maybe Haydn too. This is a good place for you to start. I think people recommending romantic and modern music are missing the point of what you are looking for. Mozart piano concertos or chamber music would be a great place to start.


I second the Mozart and Haydn.

Mozart Symphonies Nos. 28, 29 and 35 conducted by Claudio Abbado with the Berlin Philharmonic is one of my all time favorite CDs.
 
Apr 15, 2008 at 5:20 AM Post #20 of 23

pdennis

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Quote:

Originally Posted by classicalguy /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I have one word for you. Mozart, Mozart, Mozart. Maybe Haydn too. This is a good place for you to start. I think people recommending romantic and modern music are missing the point of what you are looking for. Mozart piano concertos or chamber music would be a great place to start.


This makes no sense to me.

Sure, the OP said that Mozart was closer than Shostakovich... but I hardly see how you can draw your conclusion from that. Some people jibe with Mozart and Haydn, some don't. The OP is going about this in a very sensible way, IMO: informed experimentation.

That said, I'd be interested to know what motivated the recommendations of Riley and Ives. Great music, but I wouldn't have suggested them in this thread any more than I would have the Mahler. You need to learn how to listen to them (Riley & Ives, not necessarily Mahler) much more so than with, for example, Debussy.
 
Apr 15, 2008 at 2:53 PM Post #21 of 23
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The *** Adagios recommendation was brilliant.
I now have the Guitar Adagios, Violin Adagios, Cello Adagios, and one that I am especially enjoying: Midnight Adagios.
Compilations were a good call as I can get a taste of many composers/periods.
It's a good start and I am excited as to where it will lead me, thanks everyone!
 
Apr 15, 2008 at 3:32 PM Post #22 of 23

classicalguy

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The problem with greatest hits is you're not hearing the whole piece as the composer intended. Movements were not written as separate individual songs. They were an integrated part of a single song. You're missing the point of the piece by disembodying the movements from the entire piece. If you want to learn and grow as a listener, you need to listen to complete works.
 

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