Chopin--why doesn't he get too much respect here?
Feb 14, 2009 at 8:17 PM Post #61 of 76

DarkAngel

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The Chopin CDs are now coming in..........

I can say this much right now, if you want to hear the very best Chopin available IMO you must have room in your collection for historical performances and learn to live with some surface noise of 78rpm record recordings. The style of Chopin playing 70 years ago is different than modern performers and for me usually much better.

Rubinstein, Cortot, Lipatti and many others had a more virtuostic style with more individual flair........very easily heard for instance when you compare 1930s Rubinstein to the 1960s versions of the same works. Modern versions tend to be slower, softer, smoother almost schmaltzy compared to these older versions

No way am I selling the Cortot/EMI Chopin set now mentioned before, but the Naxos versions can have better sound if you can find them, many not sold in USA for copyright reasons. Perfect example is the Cortot/Naxos waltz CD which has about 50% less surface noise while seeming to keep all the detail of the EMI set......a win/win situation, this is one of the very best waltz performances along with Lipatti, have not heard a modern set that I would rank in the same catagory.........(but I am still searching of course)

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Feb 18, 2009 at 1:26 AM Post #62 of 76

doping panda

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Quote:

Originally Posted by DarkAngel /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I can say this much right now, if you want to hear the very best Chopin available IMO you must have room in your collection for historical performances and learn to live with some surface noise of 78rpm record recordings.


That's not only the case with just Chopin, but a good amount of classical music in general
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Maybe I just missed it, but I don't think I've seen a single mention of Richter in this thread. That makes me a little sad. He generally doesn't play full sets of Chopin and many of his recordings have sub-par sound quality, but his actual interpretations are extraordinary. I still don't think I've listened to a Chopin recording I enjoy more than Richter's Ballade No.1; it's absolutely breathtaking.
 
Feb 18, 2009 at 2:07 AM Post #63 of 76

mbd2884

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Chopin was fun to play when I played some of his stuff, err, don't really remember them, but do remember I had fun.
 
Feb 18, 2009 at 1:24 PM Post #64 of 76
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This thread is exactly what I needed. I've been hunting for some good Chopin for a while. Thanks everyone who shared recommendations.
 
Feb 19, 2009 at 1:50 AM Post #66 of 76

xodeuce

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There's also Horowitz's Favorite Chopin Vol 1 and Vol 2. Mix of studio and live stuff.
 
Feb 24, 2009 at 3:55 PM Post #67 of 76

lwd

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I'd just like to put in another good word for Cortot's Chopin. There's a 7cd box set of his EMI recording released recently and it includes some great Chopin.

The sounds is good for the era, but the sheer musicality is just breathtaking.
 
Mar 17, 2009 at 11:43 PM Post #68 of 76

DarkAngel

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If you love Chopin waltzes I accidently discovered this rare collection of Schubert piano waltzes:
(I didn't even know these existed previously)

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Absolutely delightful short works with irresistable lifted dance rythms, what a great find this was, 138 total waltzes!
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Mar 18, 2009 at 12:12 AM Post #69 of 76

DarkAngel

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I have completed my search for the ultimate Chopin Mazurkas and my choice is 1938-39 Rubinstein set, available in 2CD RCA (volume 6) or 5CD EMI misc set:

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Don't worry the sound is actually pretty good since they were recorded at Abbey Road studios. These are much better than the somewhat bland sounding two later sets recorded by Rubinstein, the dance rythms are much more intact and playing is far more lively and animated.......unfortunately I can say the same for almost every other mazurka set I have heard by anyone post WWII, they all sound by varying degrees disjointed and muddled without a clear melodic line or structure.

One partial stereo selection that stands out is the Michelangeli/DG commented earlier here, but even these don't have the same cohesive feel that early Rubenstein acheives, if you must have modern stereo sound this is on your very short list.

There is an early Naxos historical recording by Ignaz Friedman that matches the early Rubinstein, but only contains small number and sound quality in not nearly as good
 
Mar 18, 2009 at 1:02 AM Post #70 of 76

daycart1

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I'm coming in late here, but for HEADPHONE listening, the later Arrau recordings are very fine. Lots of bass line definition (check out the Nocturnes, e.g.) and majestic tempi.
 
Mar 18, 2009 at 4:10 PM Post #71 of 76

Bunnyears

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Quote:

Originally Posted by DarkAngel /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I have completed my search for the ultimate Chopin Mazurkas and my choice is 1938-39 Rubinstein set, available in 2CD RCA (volume 6) or 5CD EMI misc set:

51dYmw3tMDL._SL500_AA240_.jpg
41FTNRCMDWL._SL500_AA240_.jpg


Don't worry the sound is actually pretty good since they were recorded at Abbey Road studios. These are much better than the somewhat bland sounding two later sets recorded by Rubinstein, the dance rythms are much more intact and playing is far more lively and animated.......unfortunately I can say the same for almost every other mazurka set I have heard by anyone post WWII, they all sound by varying degrees disjointed and muddled without a clear melodic line or structure.

One partial stereo selection that stands out is the Michelangeli/DG commented earlier here, but even these don't have the same cohesive feel that early Rubenstein acheives, if you must have modern stereo sound this is on your very short list.

There is an early Naxos historical recording by Ignaz Friedman that matches the early Rubinstein, but only contains small number and sound quality in not nearly as good



Ultimate Chopin Mazurkas in more modern sound are by Garrick Ohlsson (AR). Unfortunately, it will cost a pretty penny for Vol. 11: Mazurkas.

However, for the same money you can get the same recordings of the Mazurkas originally made by Arabesque Records in the box set of Complete Works by Chopin reissued by Hyperion. Garrick Ohlsson is considered one of the greatest Chopinists to come down the pike, and 16 CDs for about $112 (including s&h from Caiman) is equivalent to YourMusic.com pricing.

“This monumental recording project first came about when the American record company Arabesque approached me with an irresistible offer to record the complete works of Chopin. I accepted with enthusiasm and an awareness of the magnitude of the task. My total immersion in the Chopin project was enhanced by a concurrent series of recitals of the complete solo works in the US and several European capitals from 1995 to 1997. I am delighted that these recordings are now available again as a boxed set on Hyperion.” Garrick Ohlsson

Btw, the set also includes Chopin's lesser known works: songs, orchestral pieces, variations on themes by other composers, et al. that are rarely performed or recorded.

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Mar 27, 2009 at 11:38 AM Post #72 of 76

8140david

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Pierre Goy (Switzerland) plays Chopin on a pianoforte similar to those used by the composer:
"Chopin à Vienne", Pierre Goy, pianoforte
Wild Palms Music, 2006 - Label: Lyrinx - Duration: 1h8mn
See for instance these links:
Audiophile Mélomane - Chopin à Vienne - Goy
VirginMega
It's very good, I find.
And extremely interesting to hear Chopin on a pianoforte.

I also like very much the Nocturnes played by Daniel Barenboim. This double cd:
"Chopin - Nocturnes (enregistrement intégral)", Daniel Barenboim, piano
Deutsche Grammophon
http://www.rhapsody.com/daniel-baren...octurnes--1995

And although I didn't listen to this other version (1cd), still by Barenboim, it looks like a bargain:
Chopin - Nocturnes pour piano : Daniel Barenboïm, Frédéric Chopin: Amazon.fr: Musique
 
Mar 27, 2009 at 12:36 PM Post #73 of 76

8140david

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I have just been listening to Mitsuko Shirai's lieders: this is simply incredible! So beautiful!
So much so, that I will open a new post about lieders in this forum.
And mind you, this 10 cds set is only 25 euros or so!
jpc - Mitsuko Shirai - Lied Edition (10 CDs)
 
Mar 27, 2009 at 1:57 PM Post #74 of 76

Bunnyears

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Quote:

Originally Posted by 8140david /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I have just been listening to Mitsuko Shirai's lieders: this is simply incredible! So beautiful!
So much so, that I will open a new post about lieders in this forum.
And mind you, this 10 cds set is only 25 euros or so!
jpc - Mitsuko Shirai - Lied Edition (10 CDs)



David, you have to open a new thread for this, not merely post about Lied in the Chopin thread.
 
May 3, 2009 at 4:19 AM Post #75 of 76

stokitw

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Bunnyears /img/forum/go_quote.gif
In any event, my favorite Chopin nocturnes are by Ivan Moravec, who really gets into the emotional subtext of the music as well as having complete technical mastery. And the usual suspects: Arrau, Horowitz, and Rubenstein.

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OMG, I have to agree with you again..
I was so lucky to get Moravec's nocturnes.
Recently, I just played it on my newly grab GS-1000.
I was speechless..
I knew his play is so delicate, and it is those tiny little detail makes his interpretation so special.
With GS-1000, I can actually sit back and enjoy those detail without much effort.
I just totally soak in his amazing play....
The whole world becomes so quiet....
I can hardly find a nocturne album which I hate, but Moravec's recording remains to be the special one..
 

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