Cayin N3 Hi-Res DAP with AKM4490 DAC, apt-X Bluetooth, and Line, USB & Coax Out for $150
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My headphone jack on the N3 is cutting out and making tracks stop and skip, does anyone know of a way to replace the headphone jack on the N3? It’s annoying because it basically renders the player as useless but I love it so much I wanna save it! Oh my beloved music brick :frowning2:
 
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My headphone jack on the N3 is cutting out and making tracks stop and skip, does anyone know of a way to replace the headphone jack on the N3? It’s annoying because it basically renders the player as useless but I love it so much I wanna save it! Oh my beloved music brick :frowning2:
Is this happening with just one iem or headphone? Mine was doing this with one certain iem that had a mic and I think the problem was in the mic wiring.
 
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If we must answer your question, the answer will be a straightforward "we don't know". We can't determine the compatibility of the battery based on the data provided by aliexpress store, and we don't even know if their data is reliable. The only way to do that is to buy a few samples (not less then 5) and run a series of test to determine the physical dimension (and variation), electrical characteristic and safety measurements of the battery. I don't think there is any consumer electronic manufacture will do that Certify an unbranded aftermarket Lithium battery as acceptable replacement is a very high risk procedure, we simply can't take the risk of having a third-party Lithium battery exploded in N3 while charging and playing and then the battery is somehow "certified" by Cayin.

There are several factors that affect the life of a Lithium-ion battery. For example, partial or swallow discharge pattern reduces stress and prolongs battery life, deep discharge pattern will, on the other hand, increase stress and shorten batter life. This article explains how Depth of Discharge (DOD), temperature and charging current will affect the "Cycle" life of a Lithium battery. For the records, we have sold over 10,000 units of N3 already, and over 50% were sold in 2017 (first six months of launch to be exact), Majority of these players are still running with an acceptable batter performance. Be reminded that domestic customer can send their N3 tou us at $3 to $10 only, so if the battery replacement cost is very low to them, and yet we only received a handful of battery replacement request so far.

If you must replace the battery of your N3, you have to send the player back to the factory in China. You can either do that through your local Cayin dealer or email service@cayin.cn for more detail.
I agree with you that it would be next to impossible (and certainly not economical) for Cayin to certify/approve 3rd party batteries to work with Cayin's products as Cayin has no control over any aspect of their supply chain.

Would it be possible to make the batteries Cayin uses available to the general public through it's dealers just like how Cayin sells other Cayin accessories - ie cases? Yes, there would be transport restrictions with Li-ion batteries but surely there are ways around it... Maybe instead of flying the the battery to the customer or authorized reseller, the shipment can take the slowest route by sea going freighter?
 
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My headphone jack on the N3 is cutting out and making tracks stop and skip, does anyone know of a way to replace the headphone jack on the N3? It’s annoying because it basically renders the player as useless but I love it so much I wanna save it! Oh my beloved music brick :frowning2:
Is this happening with just one iem or headphone? Mine was doing this with one certain iem that had a mic and I think the problem was in the mic wiring.
Over the years, I've learned that 3.5mm plugs basically suffer from 4 things:

1. Broken solder joints where the solder connection between the headphone jack and the printed circuit board cracks resulting in intermittent contact if the plug is moved. This is often confused with a broken or defective jack. - Solution: resolder the joint. In extreme cases you need to remove the jack, clean up the solder connections and re-install the jack but in most case, just remelting the solder with a touch of new solder should do the trick.
2. Dirty contacts on either the plug or jack side. Various bits of grease or oils collect on the contacts when combined with the small bit of electricity that is flowing may create an electrical barrier causing what you are hearing. Try cleaning the plug first with some alcohol and a microfiber cloth. If that doesn't work, find a good contact cleaner/condition like DeOxit and spray the contacts. Just becareful with the N3 side of things as you don't want too much of that stuff swimming around in the player. Once you spray it, insert the plug and wiggle it around a bit to break up the dirt and grim. If you find that the situation improves after spraying but comes back later on, do clean it again.
3. An actual mechanical fault in the jack itself. This is rare. The part gets the blame because most people don't try the above two things.
4. Headphone cable is broken. Happens a lot and it typically happens that the cable breaks right next to the strain relief of the plug itself. Verify it's not the cable.

I would try number 4 -> 2 -> 1 -> 3 first as 4 is the easiest solution and 3 is the hardest.
 
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Over the years, I've learned that 3.5mm plugs basically suffer from 4 things:

1. Broken solder joints where the solder connection between the headphone jack and the printed circuit board cracks resulting in intermittent contact if the plug is moved. This is often confused with a broken or defective jack. - Solution: resolder the joint. In extreme cases you need to remove the jack, clean up the solder connections and re-install the jack but in most case, just remelting the solder with a touch of new solder should do the trick.
2. Dirty contacts on either the plug or jack side. Various bits of grease or oils collect on the contacts when combined with the small bit of electricity that is flowing may create an electrical barrier causing what you are hearing. Try cleaning the plug first with some alcohol and a microfiber cloth. If that doesn't work, find a good contact cleaner/condition like DeOxit and spray the contacts. Just becareful with the N3 side of things as you don't want too much of that stuff swimming around in the player. Once you spray it, insert the plug and wiggle it around a bit to break up the dirt and grim. If you find that the situation improves after spraying but comes back later on, do clean it again.
3. An actual mechanical fault in the jack itself. This is rare. The part gets the blame because most people don't try the above two things.
4. Headphone cable is broken. Happens a lot and it typically happens that the cable breaks right next to the strain relief of the plug itself. Verify it's not the cable.

I would try number 4 -> 2 -> 1 -> 3 first as 4 is the easiest solution and 3 is the hardest.
I would actually a "1b" to your 1st point. Most of the issues isn't broken solder (due to "cheap" manufacturing), but rather that RoHS compliancy has made solder brittle and unreliable. With flow soldering and smaller components, the issue is exasperated due to tiny filet of solder that gets applied. The first thing I do to most high stress items (such as jacks, large capacitor solder pads, and voltage regulator pads) or high heat items (such as amplifier FETs, power transistors, or transformer pads) is to wick off the solder, clean all flux residue, lightly buff the pad (use a fiberglass pencil), and finally re-solder with a nice leaded solder (typically a 63/37 with water-soluble flux). The lead give the joints the ability to handle flexing or vibration (yes, electronic contacts do vibrate) with less likelihood of fracturing the joint.

RoHS may be good for the environment (and politician's pockets), but bad for quality and longevity of electronics. I've repaired hundreds of automotive modules where the only issue was cracked or decayed solder joints, due to no-lead solder, had fractured over the course of time (some in as little as a 1 year old vehicle). Many of these modules had already been replaced with new ones, which suffered the same fate as the original. Since a resoldering with leaded solder, the problem hadn't returned to a single repaired module.

I've noticed lately that a lot of really high-end electronics, mostly scientific and test equipment, have had a "contains lead" warning sticker attached. It seems that the electronics world is finally starting to see that lead is actually a good thing in solder!
 
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I would actually a "1b" to your 1st point. Most of the issues isn't broken solder (due to "cheap" manufacturing), but rather that RoHS compliancy has made solder brittle and unreliable.
For many things, I would agree with you 100%. However, we are living in an era where many things are just slapped together (especially the low end/cheap electronics that are so common these days) in order to get them out the door for the lowest possible price. Or they are assembled in small sweatshops that are no bigger than a double garage located in a rural area of a 3rd world country. You can't expect high-quality work in those conditions. If you cruise over the low-cost headphone cable thread, many of the lost cost cables exhibit the results of working in those conditions.
With flow soldering and smaller components, the issue is exasperated due to tiny filet of solder that gets applied. The first thing I do to most high stress items (such as jacks, large capacitor solder pads, and voltage regulator pads) or high heat items (such as amplifier FETs, power transistors, or transformer pads) is to wick off the solder, clean all flux residue, lightly buff the pad (use a fiberglass pencil), and finally re-solder with a nice leaded solder (typically a 63/37 with water-soluble flux). The lead give the joints the ability to handle flexing or vibration (yes, electronic contacts do vibrate) with less likelihood of fracturing the joint.

RoHS may be good for the environment (and politician's pockets), but bad for quality and longevity of electronics. I've repaired hundreds of automotive modules where the only issue was cracked or decayed solder joints, due to no-lead solder, had fractured over the course of time (some in as little as a 1 year old vehicle). Many of these modules had already been replaced with new ones, which suffered the same fate as the original. Since a resoldering with leaded solder, the problem hadn't returned to a single repaired module.

I've noticed lately that a lot of really high-end electronics, mostly scientific and test equipment, have had a "contains lead" warning sticker attached. It seems that the electronics world is finally starting to see that lead is actually a good thing in solder!
Once again, I agree with you 100% as the rush to demonize lead has created an environment of premature, preventable failures that are filling out landfills which is probably causing more environmental damage than the inclusion of lead in solder in the first place.
 
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I've been having a minor issue with my battery as well, it doesn't charge up to 100%, but rather gets caught continually charging at 98-99%. This is after fully discharging the battery twice. It isn't an issue for me (YET), since since the battery life is still very good, but it does make me wonder how long it will last. I have to be sure not to leave it on the charger overnight because it will just keep trying to get to 100% and I assume that's not good for the battery at all.
 
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Speaking of batteries, here's a thought...

According to popular understanding, Lith-ion batteries don't like to be completely discharged nor do they like to be charged over 80% as it will degrade the battery over each charge. Ideally, the battery should stay between the 20% to 80% range in as far as discharging and charging (ie discharge to 20% and recharged to 80%). You can discharge it less (ie to 40%) but that just reduces the overall useability of the product and may not increase the longevity of the battery. Unfortunately, battery meters somehow become uncalibrated with the battery during these reduced charging cycles and after a few cycles, the battery meter becomes wildly unaccurate and a full discharge/recharge (ie discharge to 0 and recharge to 100%) is needed to 'right the ship' again and this should be done every 5 to 10 recharge cycles.

So, would it be possible to automate it in the firmware so that the charging cycle would stop charging by default at 80% but for every 5th charging cycle or so, charge the battery to 100% so that the battery meter is calibrated?

Example:
Charge 1 ->>> 80%
Charge 2 ->>> 80%
Charge 3 ->>> 80%
Charge 4 ->>> 80%
Charge 5 ->>> 80%
Charge 6 ->>>100%
Charge 7 ->>> 80%

I realize that there might be a bunch of customer complaints thinking that the battery isn't performing to spec so it might be a feature that you would turn on in order to increase the battery's longevity. On the UI, the battery meter's colour might even be changed (ie from the current white to blue) to show that the battery longevity mode is on.
 
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I've been having a minor issue with my battery as well, it doesn't charge up to 100%, but rather gets caught continually charging at 98-99%. This is after fully discharging the battery twice. It isn't an issue for me (YET), since since the battery life is still very good, but it does make me wonder how long it will last. I have to be sure not to leave it on the charger overnight because it will just keep trying to get to 100% and I assume that's not good for the battery at all.
Heat is the other killer of batteries (the first being charging it to 100%) and leaving it charging trying to get to 100% may just produce more heat than what is good for the battery.
 
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Heat is the other killer of batteries (the first being charging it to 100%) and leaving it charging trying to get to 100% may just produce more heat than what is good for the battery.
I just wish we could change the battery ourselves when the time comes. I will be sad to be unable to use my N3 (or any of my others) when the battery dies.
 
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I just wish we could change the battery ourselves when the time comes. I will be sad to be unable to use my N3 (or any of my others) when the battery dies.
Over the past few years with my electronic devices, I've found that the hardest part is not sourcing the battery but getting into the unit itself without destroying it. From what I've read on this thread, getting into the N3 isn't that hard (a lot easier than most tablets). The hard part is to get a battery with the same physical dimensions and connector. It's been my experience that battery of a similar size often has the same rated capacity and the only question left is the quality of the battery.

I'm sure Caiyin doesn't make the battery themselves but sources from one of the many suppliers in China and then finds one that meets their strict standards.
 
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I agree with you that it would be next to impossible (and certainly not economical) for Cayin to certify/approve 3rd party batteries to work with Cayin's products as Cayin has no control over any aspect of their supply chain.

Would it be possible to make the batteries Cayin uses available to the general public through it's dealers just like how Cayin sells other Cayin accessories - ie cases? Yes, there would be transport restrictions with Li-ion batteries but surely there are ways around it... Maybe instead of flying the the battery to the customer or authorized reseller, the shipment can take the slowest route by sea going freighter?
We can sell the battery FOB, we can't find any service provider to send the Lithium battery oversee, not even by sea. If there is a way, we definitely will send battery to our oversee dealers and make them available to local customers. There is a practical reason why no body is doing that, Cayin is just one of them.
 
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Over the past few years with my electronic devices, I've found that the hardest part is not sourcing the battery but getting into the unit itself without destroying it. From what I've read on this thread, getting into the N3 isn't that hard (a lot easier than most tablets). The hard part is to get a battery with the same physical dimensions and connector. It's been my experience that battery of a similar size often has the same rated capacity and the only question left is the quality of the battery.

I'm sure Caiyin doesn't make the battery themselves but sources from one of the many suppliers in China and then finds one that meets their strict standards.
The N3 battery is a custom make item, we designed the chassic and test the player with a smaller battery during R&D phase, then we measured the maximum size available after the physically dimensions are confirmed and custom make the biggest possible battery for N3 mass production. So even if you contact the battery shop that we bought the battery from, that won't have any N3 battery available because they should have delivered the complete production log to us already.
 
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I've been having a minor issue with my battery as well, it doesn't charge up to 100%, but rather gets caught continually charging at 98-99%. This is after fully discharging the battery twice. It isn't an issue for me (YET), since since the battery life is still very good, but it does make me wonder how long it will last. I have to be sure not to leave it on the charger overnight because it will just keep trying to get to 100% and I assume that's not good for the battery at all.
My advice is, stopping pushing the battery to its limit, if you want to extend the battery life as much as possible, stop charging anywhere between 80% and 90%, and try not to let the battery drop below 10%
 
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Speaking of batteries, here's a thought...

According to popular understanding, Lith-ion batteries don't like to be completely discharged nor do they like to be charged over 80% as it will degrade the battery over each charge. Ideally, the battery should stay between the 20% to 80% range in as far as discharging and charging (ie discharge to 20% and recharged to 80%). You can discharge it less (ie to 40%) but that just reduces the overall useability of the product and may not increase the longevity of the battery. Unfortunately, battery meters somehow become uncalibrated with the battery during these reduced charging cycles and after a few cycles, the battery meter becomes wildly unaccurate and a full discharge/recharge (ie discharge to 0 and recharge to 100%) is needed to 'right the ship' again and this should be done every 5 to 10 recharge cycles.

So, would it be possible to automate it in the firmware so that the charging cycle would stop charging by default at 80% but for every 5th charging cycle or so, charge the battery to 100% so that the battery meter is calibrated?

Example:
Charge 1 ->>> 80%
Charge 2 ->>> 80%
Charge 3 ->>> 80%
Charge 4 ->>> 80%
Charge 5 ->>> 80%
Charge 6 ->>>100%
Charge 7 ->>> 80%

I realize that there might be a bunch of customer complaints thinking that the battery isn't performing to spec so it might be a feature that you would turn on in order to increase the battery's longevity. On the UI, the battery meter's colour might even be changed (ie from the current white to blue) to show that the battery longevity mode is on.
Thanks for concurring our repeated advice on proper use of Lithium battery. We have also expressed multiple time that we need to calibrate the battery gauge and provided detail instructions Here and Here (and repeated reference to these posts elsewhere).

You don't need to calibrate the battery gauge that often, I read elsewhere that you should perform a calibration after 20 cycle of swallow charge cycle. To illustrate this concept with the number you suggested, when you charge your battery from 20% to 80%, that is 60% of a charge cycle. If you repeated this 5 times, you achieved THREE charging cycle. so on and so forth. To simplify the practise, if you practise swallow charge regularly, perform a battery gauge calibration every 2-3 months of regularly use, or after 200 hours of usage, that should be fine already.

I con't recall any DAP or mobile phone provide similar charge management features as you suggested, we all know the theory, but we don't want to get into the customer service nightmare. I can tell you that even stop charging at 99% will bring in a lot of inquiry, a lot more then you can imagine.
 
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