Can it damage my headphones?
Jun 14, 2017 at 9:38 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 21

Rayz

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Quick question: can a short time (10~20 seconds) of a very extreme level of volume (max volume, for 600ohm for instance) damage a headphones for good?
does it take that short time, or it's something you have to run for a longer time in order to fry your headphones?

I know it sounds weird, but I'm trying to learn.
Thanks!
 
Jun 14, 2017 at 10:37 AM Post #3 of 21

Rayz

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So a few seconds won't fry my headphones, you say.
 
Jun 14, 2017 at 10:47 AM Post #5 of 21

Rayz

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Then I guess that my amp isn't powerful enough (STX II).
 
Jun 14, 2017 at 10:50 AM Post #6 of 21

EGO DEATH

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If the amp didn't clip, your ears will be damaged waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaay before you damage the drivers, even with extreme overexcursion that will pop the diaphragm right off.

What does the term clip mean? Is it the pop when you connect headphones to a dap? I've been wondering if that stuff can damage hearing or the phones, as well as horrid EQs which makes makes sound of rattling metal.
 
Jun 14, 2017 at 10:58 AM Post #7 of 21

Rayz

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I've been maxing the volume level to 100% (STX II Extra High Gain) on my Ultrasone PRO 900 for a 5~10 seconds a few times by now. I know, it's hellish stupid - it's a long story.
 
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Jun 14, 2017 at 11:09 AM Post #8 of 21

ProtegeManiac

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What does the term clip mean? Is it the pop when you connect headphones to a dap? I've been wondering if that stuff can damage hearing or the phones...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clipping_(audio)

...as well as horrid EQs which makes makes sound of rattling metal.

Without hearing it for myself that rattling can be any number of things.

1. Headphone chassis rattling from the bass frequencies

2. Driver diaphragm deforming from stress

Drivers hitting the excursion limit due to boosted low bass that it can't play properly (can also be due to low damping factor or clipping on the amp; some drivers on a good amp tend to play well enough with EQ on the low bass) will sound more like a "thwackk!!!" sound trailing the bass note.
 
Jun 14, 2017 at 11:19 AM Post #9 of 21

Rayz

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I've been maxing the volume level to 100% (STX II Extra High Gain) on my Ultrasone PRO 900 for a 5~10 seconds a few times by now. I know, it's hellish stupid - it's a long story.

Can you please explain it to me?
 
Jun 14, 2017 at 12:40 PM Post #11 of 21

Rayz

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Eh, I feel like my headphones (Ultrasone PRO 900) has a little messy\shivering bass. can it happen (judging from what I described up there) or is it just in my head?
This is my first day with those cans.
 
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Jun 14, 2017 at 8:48 PM Post #13 of 21

Rayz

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I really need an answer fast, guys.
 
Jun 14, 2017 at 9:42 PM Post #14 of 21

Timoteo80

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Underpowering a speaker including headphones is worse than overpowering them. If the amp "clips" that means the amp runs out of clean power to drive the speaker. When this happens it flattens the waveform of the incoming sine wave. That turns the signal into heat instead of sound. That can instantly fry a voice coil.

You'll know pretty obviously if you've fried a coil. The bass especially will sound like flabby, popping crap. If you try different songs & they all sound "crackled" then you might have done permanent damage. If they sound good at moderate to moderately loud volume then you're probably ok. Never turn an amp volume to 100% ever IMHO. If you need more volume get a more powerful amp. You risk the amp running out of power which is bad. Running an amp that is rated at TWICE the power your headphones are rated for is better than an amp with <half the recommended power because the amp won't run out of juice & "clip". Instead, the volume will get way too loud for you to enjoy or you will hear distortion (of the speaker) long before you do permanent/instant damage.
You will most likely damage your ear drums before damaging the speaker.

I hope this info helps bud.
 
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Jun 14, 2017 at 9:54 PM Post #15 of 21

Rayz

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Underpowering a speaker including headphones is worse than overpowering them. If the amp "clips" that means the amp runs out of clean power to drive the speaker. When this happens it flattens the waveform of the incoming sine wave. That turns the signal into heat instead of sound. That can instantly fry a voice coil.

You'll know pretty obviously if you've fried a coil. The bass especially will sound like flabby, popping crap. If you try different songs & they all sound "crackled" then you might have done permanent damage. If they sound good at moderate to moderately loud volume then you're probably ok. Never turn an amp volume to 100% ever IMHO. If you need more volume get a more powerful amp. You risk the amp running out of power which is bad. Running an amp that is rated at TWICE the power your headphones are rated for is better than an amp with <half the recommended power because the amp won't run out of juice & "clip". Instead, the volume will get way too loud for you to enjoy or you will hear distortion (of the speaker) long before you do permanent/instant damage.
You will most likely damage your ear drums before damaging the speaker.

I hope this info helps bud.

Very, Very helpful. you're a life saver, thank you!
 

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