1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.

    Dismiss Notice

Burn in time, myth or fact???

Discussion in 'Sound Science' started by sonoman, Jan 9, 2006.
First
 
Back
1 2
4 5
Next
 
Last
  1. NotJeffBuckley
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Clutz
    Let me quote Sennheiser directly for you.



    Specifically they say "do not require one", that doesn't mean that the sonic characteristics of the headphones wouldn't benefit from it.




    Yeah, you could interpret it like that, but it's not implied in the quote at all.
     
  2. max-9
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by Clutz
    Let me quote Sennheiser directly for you.



    Specifically they say "do not require one", that doesn't mean that the sonic characteristics of the headphones wouldn't benefit from it.




    Well let me say or ask this.
    If there is or is not benefit from "burn in" could there be anyway to avoid "burn in" Since the "burn in" occurs simply by using the headphone the only way to avoid "burn in" would be to not use the headphone....so why is this a topic to debate? It will or will not happen anyway you look at it unless you never use the headphones at all.
     
  3. NotJeffBuckley
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by max-9
    Well let me say or ask this.
    If there is or is not benefit from "burn in" could there be anyway to avoid "burn in" Since the "burn in" occurs simply by using the headphone the only way to avoid "burn in" would be to not use the headphone....so why is this a topic to debate? It will or will not happen anyway you look at it unless you never use the headphones at all.




    This is a great perspective to take on it, and you're not alone in doing so. Burn-in really is a non-issue, but certain people (like me) make a big deal out of it for no good reason. Whether you believe it is necessary to put 300 hours into your headphone before listening to it or if you just stick it on your head and roll with it, the hours get put on it and that's that.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Clutz
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by NotJeffBuckley
    Yeah, you could interpret it like that, but it's not implied in the quote at all.



    All it says is that the headphones don't require burn in - so it also does not imply that there is no benefit to burn in. However, I have to agree with max-9

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by max-9
    Well let me say or ask this.
    If there is or is not benefit from "burn in" could there be anyway to avoid "burn in" Since the "burn in" occurs simply by using the headphone the only way to avoid "burn in" would be to not use the headphone....so why is this a topic to debate? It will or will not happen anyway you look at it unless you never use the headphones at all




    Whatever benefit that exists from burn-in will occur regardless of whether or not someone specifically attempts to burn in a pair of headphones or uses them normally. That said, I think the debate is more whether or not people should bother leaving their headphones running while they're not in use on the listeners head for the first dozen to few hundred hours or so, in order to get the headphones to sound their best sooner rather than later.
     
  5. dhruvmeena96
    Fastest way of reaching ideal burn time...

    Only for dynamic driver iem

    10hrs of pink noise(2hrs continuous 10min break)-40% vol

    5hrs of white noise(1hr continuous 10mjn break)-20% vol

    5hrs of bass tone rated lowest by manufacturer, if on non audible scale, then go for 18hz because lower than 18hz clip all iem. (Volume where bass doesn't distort, it should sound clean)

    2hrs log sweep(40% volume)
    2hrs linear sweep(40% volume)

    24 hours and you are done.

    Pink noise loads the driver in log wave mixed in noise. This is to be done in first as pink noise transition is smoother which helps in loosening of suspension or surround without frequency braking.

    White noise is aggressive linear noise which quickens the process because of treble frequency attack.

    Now it is the turn of bass tone. Well now you are way more safe from sudden rupture of any part of iem(I destroyed some pair while burning when I was kid). Turn up the volume till the bass is clean from distortion and decay. Let it burn for 5hrs continuous. Temperature rise due to energy loosens up iem quicker.

    Let it then rest.

    Then do full frequency sweeps, and 5min rest per 1hr sweep. Log and linear sweep will add finishing to burn due to strong braking and quick starting.


    Enjoy your iem.
     
  6. 329161
    Don't kid around like that. A lot of people here will take you seriously and actually do it. :o2smile:
     
    Amberlamps and dhruvmeena96 like this.
  7. up late
    this thread should either be moved to the sound science forum or locked. the only question i have in relation to this thread topic is why would the op who has been a member of this forum since 2005 raise it now?
     
  8. dhruvmeena96
    Not kidding...

    IEM mostly have in ear resonance on higher frequency and impedance peaking(voice coil stiffness) on 2khz 4khz 6khz so normal speaker burn in is really is not effective.


    Well the peaks are somewhat very low, but it sounds like compression in treble...

    So you have to burn with the help of pink and white noises. Then use bass tone to actually make iem diaphragm flex some more.


    Then a sweep to make sure that burn is complete.


    Give iem the rated wattage and use log and linear sweep. If you face cracking issues or somewhat compressed treble. Then it means it need one more round of burn. But I don't think I should cross 50hrs mark. Because this setting is already brutal(vol is 40%)
     
  9. dhruvmeena96
    That's the sweg bro....well I got to know about this thread today.



    Pretty nicely explained science which was absent on other forum
     
  10. up late
    as i said, then this thread should either be moved to the "other forum" or locked because this topic has been done to death, bro
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2018
    dhruvmeena96 likes this.
  11. 329161
    Science. LOL
     
  12. Humblepie
    To the OP and others about burn in.

    BURN IN is a physical prove-able fact to a degree.

    So what is burning in? It is normal wear and tear on a moving part. That's it. So what does burn in do for a speaker diaphragm. Now THAT is the AH-HAH! moment. Some speakers it does very little and some it does a lot. This is why some claim it is a myth and others a fact. So the answer to question of why is works on some diaphragms and not others is due to how those diaphragms are made.

    Let's start with dynamic drivers since they are the easiest to explain. A dynamic driver is a "cone" of material attached to a voice coil set inside a magnet assembly. The voice coil gets alternating current at various amplitudes and frequencies. As the current changes, the voice coil generates a magnetic field around it with an alternating polarity in relation to the current. The strength, speed, and polatiry of the field generated by the voice coil is acted upon by the magnet assembly surrounding it which forces the voice coil to move in relation to that magnet. That movement also moves the cone diaphragm which moves the air next to the cone to produce sound waves. Then we get sound!

    With the basics out of the way, the nuances occur. One thing is that the voice coil assembly is smaller that the cone. This can cause the inside of the cone to be moving in a direction opposite to the outside of the cone. When the inner part of the cone is moving in a different direction than the outer part of the cone it will cause audible distortions. To prevent that, most diaphragms in a dynamic speaker are coated with a very hard substance with just enough flexibility as to not crack the cone as it moves. Common substances are titanium and graphene. Here is where we get into the nitty gritty of burn in. As the driver moves back and forth, those substances are still going to break down and not be as rigid anymore. This will "loosen" up the driver which tends to warm up the sound signature a little bit. The amount all depends on how the driver is constructed. The material choices, the thickness of the coating, and other factors involved all make a difference when it comes to "burn in" of a driver assembly. Some manufacturers also pre burn in their units before selling them. There are some other nuances to the "burn in" effect in wear and tear on the driver assembly making audible sound differences as user can actually hear, but the one I described above is the main one. Of course there effects of wear and tear on planar and electrostatics as well. Usually burn in affect on those isn't a good thing at all especially in open assemblies that can allow dust inside.

    So is "burn in" real? Yes it is. Are you going to experience an audible difference from burn in with every speaker or headphone assembly? The answer to that is it depends. Some you will and some you won't.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2018
  13. Sgt. Ear Ache

    /thread





    ...:ksc75smile:
     
  14. Beagle
    If you don't like it or think it's been done to death, don't read it.
     
  15. Amberlamps
    LOL

    But;


    Not kidding :|
     
First
 
Back
1 2
4 5
Next
 
Last

Share This Page