Budget Super Foods
Apr 30, 2011 at 2:16 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 19

Socrates3000

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I just finished shopping, and for under $15, I was able to buy low sodium/ low fat cottage cheese, 2 sweet potatoes, Barley, Brown Rice, Navy beans, Pinto beans, 6 kiwis, and virgin olive oil/ balsamic vinegar salad dressing.
 
Are there any other members out there into saving a few dollars and healthy Eatin'? If so, what are some of your favorite healthy foods to buy on the cheap? 
 
Some of my usual favorites are canned salmon, plain unsweetened yogurt, seeds to make sprouts, tea to brew Kombucha, lentils, wheat to grow wheat grass, quinoa, frozen spinach, loose leaf green tea, broccoli and oranges. 
 
Would love to hear more tips on eatin' healthy on the cheap--
 
Apr 30, 2011 at 3:27 AM Post #2 of 19

Uncle Erik

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You're on the right path!

I like to buy rice in bulk. 5 lbs. packages are cheap, so are bigger ones. Filling and not terribly expensive. Rice cookers are nice, but you can make do with an ordinary pot.

I buy vegetables in season at roadside stands and farmer's markets. Great deals can be had on seasonal food.

Another cheap source is buying polenta/grits. Ground corn can be inexpensive and very versatile. I love to cook polenta and let it sit in 'fridge overnight. Slice and fry it after along with some fruit or maple syrup and it's terrific. Add a couple of eggs for a great meal. You might also want to shred and fry some potatoes along with it. Shredded and fried sweet potatoes are pretty special, too. Not expensive, either.
 
Apr 30, 2011 at 9:34 AM Post #4 of 19

cifani090

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Quote:
You're on the right path!

I like to buy rice in bulk. 5 lbs. packages are cheap, so are bigger ones. Filling and not terribly expensive. Rice cookers are nice, but you can make do with an ordinary pot.

I buy vegetables in season at roadside stands and farmer's markets. Great deals can be had on seasonal food.

Another cheap source is buying polenta/grits. Ground corn can be inexpensive and very versatile. I love to cook polenta and let it sit in 'fridge overnight. Slice and fry it after along with some fruit or maple syrup and it's terrific. Add a couple of eggs for a great meal. You might also want to shred and fry some potatoes along with it. Shredded and fried sweet potatoes are pretty special, too. Not expensive, either.


Your making my taste buds go crazy lol, i feel the next meet is at your house and your cooking
beerchug.gif

 
 
Apr 30, 2011 at 9:43 AM Post #5 of 19

El_Doug

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ORANGES! 
 
There is this odd new marketing term they are throwing around, "superfruit."  Acai berries, mangos, etc.... expensive offerings which, while they are quite healthy, are nothing special!  As it turns out, oranges have far more nutrients than any of these other fruits - they simply do not get the marketing term applied to them, because of how cheap and plentiful they are. 
 
 
 
 
 
...also, bacon
 
Apr 30, 2011 at 9:43 AM Post #6 of 19

Kirosia

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High protein, moderate dietary fat, moderate carbs, limit junk food, adjust calories for maintenance/deficit/bulk. (Def need to eat more veggies though, just never been a fan) I question the raw/organic craze, not to say it doesn't have results, it's just that it may not be necessary for relatively healthy living. 
 
I like fruit-filled greek yogurt, mainly for the protein. I stopped drinking milk since my body no really likey. 
 
Apr 30, 2011 at 9:46 AM Post #7 of 19

El_Doug

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Veggies are amazingly delicious, so long as you know how to cook them correctly.  I always thought I hated broccoli and asparagus, but it turns out what I hate is boiled, overcooked, brown mush.  I had never distinguished between the two before I learned to cook :) 
 
Quote:
High protein, moderate dietary fat, moderate carbs, limit junk food, adjust calories for maintenance/deficit/bulk. (Def need to eat more veggies though, just never been a fan) I question the raw/organic craze, not say it doesn't have results, it's just that it may not be necessary for relatively healthy living. 
 
I like fruit-filled greek yogurt, mainly for the protein. I stopped drinking milk since my body no really likey. 



 
 
Apr 30, 2011 at 1:19 PM Post #10 of 19

pigmode

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Bananas. I go through 8-9 a week, because its good for recovery after training. 
 
My usual breakfast is 3/4 cup oatmeal (old-style) topped with banana, cinnamon, natural honey, soy milk, and a whole wheat cinnamon-raison bagel half topped with a scrambled egg. It gets me through a moderate-hard 60 mi. bicycle training ride, with a small smoothie at halfway point. 
 
For beans, strictly the dried variety. Garbonzo, split pea, lentils, black, red, and pinto beans all go together well. 
 
Apr 30, 2011 at 2:35 PM Post #11 of 19

Socrates3000

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Eggs are good nutrition and cheap too. They have a lots of protein, and a good array of vitamins and minerals including B-vitamins. The only problem is they are very high in cholesterol and have a decent amount of saturated fat. I'm thinking in moderation, they can be a healthy and affordable choice. 
 
Apr 30, 2011 at 2:45 PM Post #12 of 19

grokit

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Eggs and dried beans, can't beat those for bang for the buck protein. I have been eating a lot less meat lately since I learned that the average adult can only digest a few of "hard protein" in an efficient manner per day. I also have been cutting out most simple carbs, and my metabolism is greatly improved. Sprouts rule, who is sprouting and what is your technique? And plain full-fat yogurt is great substitute for sour cream.
 
Apr 30, 2011 at 2:58 PM Post #13 of 19

Socrates3000

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I started sprouting. I sprout in a small mason jar with a wire mesh top. I soak the seeds over-night and rinse them a few times a day until the sprouts seem mature enough to eat. I set the jar in the sun for a few hours at the end to green them up a bit, then I store them in the fridge and eat them. 
 
Cheers to cheap eatin'
 
May 1, 2011 at 5:19 PM Post #14 of 19

pigmode

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I've been trying to limit my egg intake to 3 a week, but its too easy to get lazy trying to incorporate a substitute. Need to look into sprouting. Have tried sunflower sprouts which are great for salads.
 
My diet has changed significantly in the past year, having had pre-diabetes and bad cholesterol test results. The two conditions together requires planning and a good amount of homework. Good thread.
 

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