Breaking-in headphones, the final verdict!
post-14150020
Post #346 of 685

sonitus mirus

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Mar 23, 2009
Messages
1,735
Reaction score
574
Joined
Mar 23, 2009
Posts
1,735
Likes
574
Here is what Oscar at SoundMagic had to say about the E50. Seems like there would be some noticeable difference with refurbished headphones, but apparently that is not the case and they sound identical to new versions.

SoundMAGIC Headphones <support@soundmagicheadphones.com>
To:Shopify Notification
Apr 3 at 5:31 AM
Hi,

Burn-in is a debated subject, but I would not expect huge changes, also drivers rarely fail, and they would not go out of spec from normal usage. Many people still have full size headphones that are 20 or more years old that still work fine, it is usually the physical construction that fails first.

The refurbished will sound the same as the new ones,

Thanks,
Oscar
 
     Share This Post       
post-14150535
Post #347 of 685

tansand

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Jun 23, 2016
Messages
419
Reaction score
65
Joined
Jun 23, 2016
Posts
419
Likes
65
Oscar's makes some good iem's, I appreciate that. I almost bought some refurbished. But, you know, ears. I don't worry about bigshot, he just feels a need to express his anger his pov got disregarded. Cast aside. Abandoned. Some people can't deal with that.

I'm sorry if I hurt your feelings, bigshot. :)
 
Last edited:
     Share This Post       
post-14150666
Post #348 of 685

bigshot

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
Messages
21,372
Reaction score
3,480
Location
Hollywood USA
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
Location
Hollywood USA
Posts
21,372
Likes
3,480
Website
www.facebook.com
Ha ha! I'm having fun. If you aren't enjoying yourself, then you're doing it wrong!
 
     Share This Post       
  • Like
Reactions: upstateguy
post-14150683
Post #349 of 685

tansand

100+ Head-Fier
Joined
Jun 23, 2016
Messages
419
Reaction score
65
Joined
Jun 23, 2016
Posts
419
Likes
65
Uh huh. Somebody is always doing it wrong, right bigshot? Lmao.

:)
 
     Share This Post       
post-14150690
Post #350 of 685

Ramblinman

Head-Fier
Joined
Jan 6, 2018
Messages
60
Reaction score
2
Location
Alabama
Joined
Jan 6, 2018
Location
Alabama
Posts
60
Likes
2
The loosening up of moving materials is just common sense and silly to deny. The less energy it takes to move a diaphragm, the more efficient the diaphragms are. This results in greater detail in the the sound given the same source.

Does anyone really disagree with that?

Ok, let's hear the pad theory?

Loosely sealing pads would lower the Q and frequency of the resonance of the volume of air inside the shell/pad/whatever, like an aperiodic enclosure. Tightly sealing pads would raise Q and frequency. But, this is only one fundamental resonance, the others (higher) would be reflections inside the chamber (?), and would move little, if at all, up and down in frequency. They wouldn't just become more damped. And a soft, collapsing pad would make a better seal, raising Q and frequency, a hard one would not conform to the surface, and leak more.

Unless?

Pad theory seems pretty flaky as opposed to loosening up of moving materials theory, I have to say.

I mean, let's raise our hands. Who thinks there's at least a 50% chance the headphones under test are breaking in, as the term is generally understood, and this is exactly what the data is showing?
T
 
     Share This Post       
post-14150929
Post #351 of 685

bigshot

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
Messages
21,372
Reaction score
3,480
Location
Hollywood USA
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
Location
Hollywood USA
Posts
21,372
Likes
3,480
Website
www.facebook.com
If something is “loosening up” what makes it stop loosening up? ...and if it did stop, how could you guarantee that it stops right on the proper calibration? The thing that suggests to me that breaking in is placebo is the fact that no one ever seems to think break in sounds worse than new. That sounds to me like people’s ears are just acclimating to a new sound.
 
post-14150937
Post #352 of 685

colonelkernel8

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Dec 30, 2006
Messages
2,892
Reaction score
224
Location
Minneapolis
Joined
Dec 30, 2006
Location
Minneapolis
Posts
2,892
Likes
224
The loosening up of moving materials is just common sense and silly to deny. The less energy it takes to move a diaphragm, the more efficient the diaphragms are. This results in greater detail in the the sound given the same source.

Does anyone really disagree with that?
Who says “loosening up” the diaphragm doesn’t cause more IMD? Efficiency != “detail”.
 
Last edited:
     Share This Post       
post-14151009
Post #353 of 685

upstateguy

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Dec 20, 2004
Messages
4,067
Reaction score
161
Joined
Dec 20, 2004
Posts
4,067
Likes
161
If something is “loosening up” what makes it stop loosening up? ...and if it did stop, how could you guarantee that it stops right on the proper calibration? The thing that suggests to me that breaking in is placebo is the fact that no one ever seems to think break in sounds worse than new. That sounds to me like people’s ears are just acclimating to a new sound.
I never thought of it that way, you're absolutely right.
 
     Share This Post       
  • Like
Reactions: colonelkernel8
post-14151022
Post #354 of 685

upstateguy

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Dec 20, 2004
Messages
4,067
Reaction score
161
Joined
Dec 20, 2004
Posts
4,067
Likes
161
     Share This Post       
post-14151200
Post #355 of 685

Ramblinman

Head-Fier
Joined
Jan 6, 2018
Messages
60
Reaction score
2
Location
Alabama
Joined
Jan 6, 2018
Location
Alabama
Posts
60
Likes
2
If something is “loosening up” what makes it stop loosening up? ...and if it did stop, how could you guarantee that it stops right on the proper calibration? The thing that suggests to me that breaking in is placebo is the fact that no one ever seems to think break in sounds worse than new. That sounds to me like people’s ears are just acclimating to a new sound.
So are you aware of speaker cones becoming “too loose” ? What would you define as too loose?
So Is a baseball glove better when brand new or after it has been flexed repeatedly and loosens up?
Why?

In the case of a speaker cone, the surround stops it from loosening up beyond an engineerable point.
 
Last edited:
     Share This Post       
post-14151207
Post #357 of 685

jagwap

1000+ Head-Fier
Joined
Apr 1, 2008
Messages
1,036
Reaction score
254
Location
Dancing around the lab
Joined
Apr 1, 2008
Location
Dancing around the lab
Posts
1,036
Likes
254
If something is “loosening up” what makes it stop loosening up? ...and if it did stop, how could you guarantee that it stops right on the proper calibration? The thing that suggests to me that breaking in is placebo is the fact that no one ever seems to think break in sounds worse than new. That sounds to me like people’s ears are just acclimating to a new sound.
We went over this. You were reading it. Is this an example of that short term inability to remember details when listening that was discussed before?
 
     Share This Post       
  • Like
Reactions: skwoodwiva
post-14151252
Post #358 of 685

bigshot

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
Messages
21,372
Reaction score
3,480
Location
Hollywood USA
Joined
Nov 16, 2004
Location
Hollywood USA
Posts
21,372
Likes
3,480
Website
www.facebook.com
So are you aware of speaker cones becoming “too loose” ? In the case of a speaker cone, the surround stops it from loosening up beyond an engineerable point.
No, never saw a speaker cone get too loose. The surrounds deteriorate, but that isn't breaking in, it's wearing out. I would think it would be very hard to predict how far something is going to shift, if it's prone to shifting. You'd want to pick materials that don't deform as you use them, so it stays in spec. Maybe we're talking about cheap headphones here. Maybe $20 beaters evolve like that. I just got some $60 Monoprice cans and I've been using them for about $60 hours and I haven't noticed any difference. I guess it wouldn't matter though because they're nowhere near flat.
 
Last edited:
     Share This Post       
post-14151262
Post #359 of 685

Ramblinman

Head-Fier
Joined
Jan 6, 2018
Messages
60
Reaction score
2
Location
Alabama
Joined
Jan 6, 2018
Location
Alabama
Posts
60
Likes
2
No, never saw a speaker cone get too loose. The surrounds deteriorate, but that isn't breaking in, it's wearing out. I would think it would be very hard to predict how far something is going to shift, if it's prone to shifting. I would think that you'd want to pick materials that don't deform as you use them.
Sure they eventually disintegrate, but first they break in and allow the cone to move more freely. I don’t think it would be very hard to predict what the break in flexibility would be in a specified rubber compound used in a speaker surround.

You seem to be misunderstanding, I am talking about increasing flexibility, not deformation.
 
     Share This Post       

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top