Bose Quietcomfort2
Oct 14, 2005 at 12:09 AM Post #16 of 36

overlunge

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Fanatic
I thought noise cancellation was an active part to the headphones. They produce opposite sound waves to the exterior noise that cancels out the noise. Isolation keeps the sound from reaching your eardrum. Am I wrong?


I think that is correct, the mechanism of 'Active Noise Cancellation' is using the opposite waveform to neutralise the noise soundwaves, but it would only work well if the noise is constant, and low frequency.

Noise isloation, as name says, blocks all sound frequency to certain amplitude.


Overlunge
 
Oct 14, 2005 at 12:10 AM Post #17 of 36

crazyfrenchman27

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I suppose there *MIGHT* be a few better headphones out there for the money...I don't know...Bose has a pretty strong marketing campaign.

I would try out the Alessandro MS-2, Sennheiser HD650, Sennheiser HD595, and Beyerdynamic DT-880. That will give you a fairly good idea of what you like and dislike from your headphone. I'd probably take the DT880 as a "general" listening headphone, out of that group, but it's all personal preference.

For noise cancellation, I would go with the ety 4-s or UE-10. They will sound better than the Bose and will cancel noise better, too.

-Matt
 
Oct 14, 2005 at 12:11 AM Post #18 of 36

DobsOnly

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Fanatic
I thought noise cancellation was an active part to the headphones. They produce opposite sound waves to the exterior noise that cancels out the noise. Isolation keeps the sound from reaching your eardrum. Am I wrong?


IMHO

I consider Isolation or Cancellation as one in the same and it is acomplished by active or passive means.

Passive has more to do with the mechanical design Closed, IEM etc determining how much sound it blocks.

Active, is done through electronics to cancel out unwanted frequencies like you stated.

Just my thoughts...
 
Oct 14, 2005 at 12:22 AM Post #19 of 36

Pete7

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Return those Bose headphones now or fall forever...Just kidding, but it would be a good idea. Now that you've been exposed to the Head-Fi virus, there's probably no going back. These people really aren't kidding. I've been a member since June and I've gone through a tidy sum to get pretty much the sound I've really always wanted, but didn't even know was out there. There's a lot to be learned on these pages. I read somewhere that the actual value of a Bose headphone is like 1/3 of what you actually paid for them. Having a pair of Bose Triports collecting dust in parts unknown in my basement- I agree. The Koss,SennheiserPX100, and AKG's I have all sound way better to me, and the three of them were in the $40-55 range, while the Triports were $150. Of course, I purchased the Triports before any of those headphones.
 
Oct 14, 2005 at 1:51 AM Post #20 of 36

Cerebral_Mamba

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These guys are all being waay too nice. The bulk of the money you paid for the QC2 goes into the their noice cancelling technology, marketing and very little actually goes into the driver design. This is just my opinion based on its sound quality. I have a Grado SR325i which costs the same as the QC2, but in this case it is widely said that the bulk went into the high quality drivers it has with only thw word-of-mouth advertising. How can you even expect the QC2 to compare sound wise?

If you have any Hi-Fi shops around your place, I suggest you go there with your QC2 and make a live comparison. There's nothing like first hand experience.

If you want a systematic description and rating of various headphones, the best place i have so far found is HeadRoom . Once you have a comprehensive knowledge of whats out there and what you would like, then come back here and we'll fine tune your options. In any case, unless you have some sentimental value for the QC2 (since your wife gifted it), its not worth keeping. The sound quality is inferior to every headphones above $200 from brands like Sennheiser, Grado, AKG............. and in most cases inferior to $150 headphones by the same brands especially ones like Alessandro MS1, Grado SR125 etc.......
 
Oct 14, 2005 at 2:14 AM Post #21 of 36

davidtoc

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Most of us who bash Bose don't think their equipment sucks so much as we think it's just overpriced for what you're getting. I've owned Bose cans that I loved until I heard something that was both better and cheaper.

As has been pointed out, the noise cancellation on the Bose cancels out primarily constant/persistent noises like the hum of an airplane engine or a lawnmower outside. Not so good to block out people talking, a car horn honking, or a baby crying.

Everyone has their own favorite earphones. For the money the QC2's sell for, I'd get the Etymotic ER-4p. I don't know how I lived without mine. If you're new to IEM's, they take a little getting used to at first, but they payoff is big. The sound quality is unbeatable, and they are isolating almost to a fault, keeping out sounds to the point where you forget that there actually IS noise all around you. I wear them at home, on the bus, on the subway, in noisy cafes, and on my walk to work, and if I close my eyes, I may as well be sitting in my living room. They're good for listening to your high-end stereo, your ipod, your computer, or anything in between. When I bought them, I couldn't afford them, and they were worth every penny I spent on them. They will ruin you for other earphones.
 
Oct 14, 2005 at 3:27 AM Post #22 of 36

nikongod

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Fanatic
Thanks to everyone that has provided me with so many suggestions. In looking at some of these IEM's, am I understanding correctly that they don't necessarily do any noise cancellation, but isolate the noise instead?

BTW, I really don't want to use an amplifier with em....



the amp is not necesary to get better sound than the qc's with most iem's. even unamped my iems sound good (shure e5's) and formerly my etymotic er4p's would totally sing unamped.

at the pricepoint of a pair of bose qc2 you have MANY options which will give far superior sq without an amp.

the amp does help though...
 
Oct 14, 2005 at 3:54 AM Post #23 of 36

gerG

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I typically recommend canal phones (IEMs) as the solution to any problem. I also despise Bose products. I actually cancelled a deal on a car (Audi S4) because the dealer insisted that they could not get it without a Bose stereo.

However, for this situation, canal phones are not the answer, I think. You do not want to shut out the baby completely, and you certainly do not want to shut out and alienate that incredibly understanding wife of yours (canal phones will piss off your spouse). So how about alternatives:

Are open headphones completely out of the question? If you listen LOUD, and in the same room, it could be a problem. The kid could develop an aversion to "your" music. Oh wait, that will happen anyway, nevermind. Open cans are not all that outwardly loud, and may be acceptable if you are not too near the crib. They offer the best sound, and do not detach you from the outside world. Closed cans are the next step in isolation, but they sound, well, closed. No leakage to the outside world, and only loud sounds will get in (higher Wife Pissoff Factor). There are other active noise cancellation phones out there as well. For the price of the Bose, you could get a used pair of Sen pxc-250, and an amp. Yes, I read the first post, but please do not rule out an amplifier. It will open up a world of possibilities (like the Beyer DT880, which are power pigs). The Sen 250s are not bad at all, but they require a good seal to work properly.



gerG
 
Oct 14, 2005 at 5:39 AM Post #24 of 36

snaimpally

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IMHO almost all Bose products are overrated and overpriced.

Is the primary reason for getting headphones to (1) keep outside noise from coming in or (2) prevent what you are listening to from leaking out and disturbing others around you?

Most of the suggestions you have been given address #1 but it would seem your requirement is actually #2.

In #1 people use sealed headphones, and optionally noise-cancellation technology, to prevent outside noise from coming in. IEMS may also be used. Headphones with a good seal around the ear prevent some noise from coming in. This is called passive noise isolation. Some headphones like the Bose add active noise cancellation, in which a small mic samples the ambient noise and generates an out of phase signal to further prevent outside noise from intruding. IEMs are small transducers inserted and sealed into the ear. Instead of attempting to seal the entire ear only the entrance to the ear canal is sealed.

If you plan to watch tv or play video games while your wife and child are puttering about and making noise then sealed phones or IEMs may be the answer. However, if you are using the phones only after your child has gone to bed then #2 may be what you need.

In #2 you might be able to get away with "open" headphones that do not seal, as long as the small amount of noise that leaks out is not enough to disturb those around you. Assuming your video games and tv are located away from other's bedrooms and there are doors that can be closed, I see no reason why you cannot treat yourself to a set of Sennheiser HD650/595/580 depending on your price range. These headphones are comfortable to wear for extended periods and sound great.

I have not yet tried Grados, but from what I have read and seen in pics, the Grados are uncomfortable as they do not provide a padded headband and the ear cushions also have issues. It seems there are 3 types of Grado users, (i) those who mod their headphones by adding cushioning, (ii) those who don't listen for extended periods of time and (iii) those who have, over time, become accustomed to the pain.
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Oct 14, 2005 at 6:50 AM Post #25 of 36

Roblin

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I would like to add another type of Grado owner - one that has no real comfort issues with them. I wear mine often more than 4 hours straight daily and they're comfy for me, different for others. ..before I introduce a separate topic;

Grados definately won't isolate any sound as mentioned before. They can sound fantastic without an amp too. There was recently another thread asking whether people preferred IEM's to their regular headphones, and most chose regular sized headphones. I think the general agreement is that sound quality per dollar is better for full size phones.

First decide on whether you want in ear phones, open full size or closed full size (based on your readings on this site and elsewhere), then start the (hopefully) somewhat short process of deciding on a model of headphone based on your budget.
 
Oct 14, 2005 at 8:18 AM Post #26 of 36

iSleipnir

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If your just getting into headphones or simply looking for a pair for general use I would suggest to stay away from grados and alessandro simply because they leak too much sound as far as I'm concerned and some people have problems wearing them for extended periods of time. I do agree that they sound great, but for what your looking for I think there are better solutions.

You'll probably wany a closed headphone or a headphone that is only partially open. Any of the beyers, dt880 770 or 990, should all work, though I haven't heard the 990's. The 880s are partially open but leak very little sound. The 770s are closed but have a lot of bass (too much for my taste). All three of these are extremely comfortable.

You should also look at the AudioTechnica ATH-900A headphones as many people have said that they are a good general headphone, and very comfortable. Though, some people don't like the sound, that can be said about most headphones.

Last, I would recommend possibly the AKG 240's (which sounded a little veiled to me) or the 271's which I haven't heard but are regarded as a great closed headphone.

For what your looking to do, and as you may just be getting into the hobby I don't think you need an amplifier to start off with. It's something that can be easily added latter but shouldn't hinder your listening enjoyment much.

Oh, and for more information be sure to look at http://headphonereviews.org/ where you can find pictures, reviews and prices for most of these headphones.

Cheers,
Slep
 
Oct 14, 2005 at 4:12 PM Post #27 of 36

OceanEnthusiast

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expensive headphones as a gift? even though the quiet comforts aren't as popular here, she gave you an awesome gift.

the only thing i want to add is that i would only get IEM's if you need a lot of isolation and have a very noisy house, or will be using them mostly for travel and portable use.

otherwise, get a full-size headphone. they should provide plenty of isolation in a normal household, even open can is fine if you're listening in the other room and the house is fairly quiet. for the money I think full-sized headphones have a better sound than IEM's, are much more comfortable, and are more practical for around the house listening. i only wear IEM's when I can't wear my full-sized phones (travel) or if someone is vacuuming or something. i just think for an around the house headphone, there are better options. people have given a pretty good list of full sized headphones so far.
 
Oct 15, 2005 at 5:20 AM Post #28 of 36

Fanatic

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Thanks again for all the info
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I went & listened to some Grado 80's, & Senn 595's today. I didn't like the 80's for one reason only...comfort. The Senn's were very nice. I'm not what I would call an audiophile, but I think I could tell the difference between the Senn's & Bose. The Bose appeared to have more low end, but the Senn's had better mid's & high's. One thing is for certain...the store I went to was using a Grado amp to power the cans on display. I'm sold without a doubt on an amp. Now I have to begin the search for one of those too
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Guess I'll make my way into the amp threads for a suggestion on a portable amp...
 
Oct 23, 2005 at 1:19 AM Post #29 of 36

ITZBITZ

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IEM, in-ear monitors, are great for blocking out noises like a wife and kids.
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Plus, if you fall asleep with them in your ears, you won't hear your alarm clock in the morning and you'll be late for work! Bonus!
 
Oct 23, 2005 at 1:45 AM Post #30 of 36

nspindel

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I've used the QC2's on an airplane before. American gives them out in biz class. On an airplane they are amazing headphones, because of the noise cancellation. They're even great with nothing playing - turn the noise cancellation on with no music or anything, and voila - silence, now go to sleep. Movies on the plane sounded fantastic, since the noise of the plane was so well blocked out.

With that in mind, I figured I'd get myself a pair. So I went to a Bose store, dropped $300, plugged them into my iPod, and HATED THEM!!!! Sure, the noise cancellation worked great, but the audio sound quality was horrible for a $300 pair of cans. I don't think I even owned them one hour before I returned them.

What I decided was that if I were going to spend $300 on headphones, I wanted ones that sound GREAT. If I were to figure out the percentage of total listening time that I'd be using my headphones on an airplane, it would likely be less than 1%. So I'd rather hear the noise on the plane on the rare occasions that I'd actually be in that situation, than listen to inferior audio quality the other 99% of the time. (Plus, my long flights tend to be business trips, when the company pays for me to be in biz class and I get the QC2's for free
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)

So I did a lot of research (HeadRoom is great, as another post indicates). They rate the Senn HD650's as "Simply the best headphone in the world." Hmm, good place to start. I called around NYC to find a Senn dealer, and the one I went to had a pair of the 600's on the floor for demo. I tried them out, and almost did a double take when I heard them. I simply could not believe my ears. To think that the 650's were an upgrade from that!!! A little ebay shopping, and I found brand new 650's for $300. They retail for $549 full list, but at $300 (and they were brand new, no doubt about it) they were the same price as the Bose.

Now, these are the worst when it comes to noise isolation. You could here two people whispering to each other 20 feet away wearing these cans. But from a pure sound quality standpoint, there simply is no comparrison.
 

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