Bookshelf Speakers for Nearfield Setup
Jan 6, 2020 at 9:42 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 4

Killhifi

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Welcome back to all and Happy New Year.
I hope to find some useful advice for my search for the best passive bookshelf speakers for my desktop, the room where they will be placed is a square of 16sqm and I will use 80cm high floor supports in order to have the tweeter at the height of the ear and form a classic isosceles triangle, the distance from the back will be about 20-30cm, so listening will be to the nearfield, after a long search lasting about two years I would already have some solutions but I'm still confused because I can't do any listening tests in my environment with each type of speaker, at the bottom of the page I will list my preferences, but I would like some advice on a specific model suited to my tastes, I prefer a low present but agile controlled but a good punch, a sweet midrange without being harsh and too much in the face but that makes me distinguish male and female voices well, because I watch many films but also soundtracks, music and video games, I want the high frequencies not to ab they are whistling and not too bright but which retain a good degree of detail so as to have a good separation of the instruments, I prefer a sound that is more on the neutral warm side of the spectrum, I also like good power and dynamics but with control especially in the low frequencies as I said before, in the future I will most likely also add a subwoofer. I already have the amplifier Denon PMA-720AE.


I also wanted to add some technical assumptions about the integration of two separate units of woofer and tweeter and their tuning, is it possible that at short distances it is possible to distinguish the sounds of each unit separately? I don't want the sound to be replicated in a confused way, I don't generally know how engineers work on their crossovers if they have a generic guideline regardless of the type of brand, but I have the vague feeling that they should make sure to integrate the two units so as to carry out the task in unison by dispersing the sound evenly, does the use of concentric designs in environments in the near field turn into a real advantage?

Thank you all for your help and sorry for my bad english :beyersmile:

Dali Sperktor 2

Dali Zensor 3

Dynaudio Emit M10
 
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Jan 6, 2020 at 3:30 PM Post #2 of 4
I also wanted to add some technical assumptions about the integration of two separate units of woofer and tweeter and their tuning, is it possible that at short distances it is possible to distinguish the sounds of each unit separately? I don't want the sound to be replicated in a confused way, I don't generally know how engineers work on their crossovers if they have a generic guideline regardless of the type of brand, but I have the vague feeling that they should make sure to integrate the two units so as to carry out the task in unison by dispersing the sound evenly, does the use of concentric designs in environments in the near field turn into a real advantage?

That's a legitimate concern since the driver dispersion patterns aren't designed for playback in such close proximity. However, just getting nearfield speakers isn't always a guarantee that that won't be a problem. If your ears are equidistant to the tweeters and woofers on a nearfield speaker either because it is elevated or maybe even just angled that can sometimes still work better than if you mounted the nearfield speakers firing straight from a lower position than your head ie the desk.

That being said, nearfield speakers have compatibility with more pro audio mounting hardware like arms that screw on to the back of each cabinet, and are still more likely to work properly once mounted properly, and have more powerful amps in each cabinet rather than needing a separate and still bulky amp (outside of tiny 8wpc Class D amps), requiring only a preamp output for control.
 
Jan 7, 2020 at 1:57 AM Post #4 of 4
Hi @Kilhifi,

As @ProtegeManic pointed out, driver dispersion patterns for separated tweeter & woofer, especially at close proximity don't work for those obvious technical reasons as he outlined.
Personally, I also don't subscribe to the audio idiot rule of the triangle or sweet spot for speakers for various reasons.
Saying that, I do use nearfield monitors (2 pairs) though both lean towards the midfield category in terms of what they can put out in both SPL, Imaging, Detail & Clarity.

Using my setup as an example,

On Desk :
Pair of Kali LP 8 at each corner.
Front facing about 30 cm to the side & from me in a rough L shape at about the same distance but they are not positioned towards me at my main listening position at but both still go past my head.

On Stands :
Pair of Genelec 8010
Rear Facing off to each side from my main listening position, roughly 30 cm apart though probably closer to 60 cm if you don't include stand bases.

An important side note, for either of these speaker placements, no special consideration was given for the distances involved except for actual desk size & room dimensions.
Also, there are minor issues with where the LP 8s are positioned as a small PC case & one PC monitor mostly blocks the direct sound waves on the left while another PC monitor mostly blocks the right speaker's direct sound waves.
However, there is near infinite space on either sound so it's almost like there is no real obstacle in the first place.

Both speaker pairs have built in tweeters & sub drivers built in along with dedicated amp circuits as @ProtegeManiac mentioned as both these are pro audio monitors or speakers.
The main volume & sound levels are all managed via a monitor controllor, Drawmer MC 2.1, which managed sound from my PC via a USB DAC, RME ADI 2 Pro FS.
I also have a hi fi sub which is connected via the ADI 2 Pro FS' TRS outputs via RCA adapters.

As a further side note, I also have connected via the DAC's main headphone output the Presonus HP4 which sends the audio signal to a Marantz PM 5005 which drives PMC DB 1 Golds for overall ambient sound for the rest of the room.

Hope this all makes sense, feel free to ask more.

As a final note, I have heard the Dalis & due to being sensitive in the Highs, they are definitely not for me & while I haven't heard the Emit M10, unfortunately, subjectively & personally, Dynaudio sound doesn't do anything for me.

Hope you have a great day !
 

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