Beyerdynamic DT 1990 PRO - Beyer's open-back mastering headphone
Nov 4, 2017 at 10:32 AM Post #1,217 of 4,089

cardeli22

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B pads (Assuming these are the ones that come factory installed).

Pulled the trigger, got the 1990.
Nice. The misses surprised me with them as an early Christmas present. I like both pads but, for me, I find it having too much bass for certain genres like EDM. I truly suck at swapping the pads so I normally have to ask the wife to do it. She can swap them out instantly. LOL yes I was the guy having a hard time drawing with-in the lines.
 
Nov 6, 2017 at 5:22 PM Post #1,218 of 4,089

Luminance

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I bought few pairs of the earpads from different Beyerdynamic models in order to test how they will do with the DT 1990 and I thought I would report here. I have been using the A pads most of the time, but sometimes I wished the bass was a little more present, especially in some live recordings I used to listen.

T1 G2 (EDT T1G2) - I believe these are identical to the 1990's balanced pads. Same look and feel. They also sound the same to the B pads or at least very similar. Skip these
DT 990 silver pads (EDT 990 V) - sound signature nearly identical to the 1990's analytical pads. Quite comfortable, but the material of the A pads has much better feel. So skip these as well.
T1 G1 (EDT T1V) - these are quite interesting actually. Very comfortable, but the material of the A pads still has better quality. They do creak a little if I move my head in a specific way, but it doesn't bother me too much (edit: I just realized it's due to glasses I wear). And now the sound. To my non audiophile ears the sound is right between the A and B pads. Slightly more bass than the A pads got, but not as much as the B pads have. Midrange is present and doesn't feel recessed. With the B pads I felt the mids were a little overshadowed by the bass. Treble has slightly less emphasis than the one on the A pads, but still seems clearer than B. Although I have to admit that the B pads do the best job for taming the cymbals abuse in certain songs.
T1V are the ones I prefer right now.

(edit: I just realized that this slight creak sound when I shake my head is due to my glasses)
 
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Nov 7, 2017 at 3:19 AM Post #1,219 of 4,089

Chris1975

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I bought few pairs of the earpads from different Beyerdynamic models in order to test how they will do with the DT 1990 and I thought I would report here. I have been using the A pads most of the time, but sometimes I wished the bass was a little more present, especially in some live recordings I used to listen.

T1 G2 (EDT T1G2) - I believe these are identical to the 1990's balanced pads. Same look and feel. They also sound the same to the B pads or at least very similar. Skip these
DT 990 silver pads (EDT 990 V) - sound signature nearly identical to the 1990's analytical pads. Quite comfortable, but the material of the A pads has much better feel. So skip these as well.
T1 G1 (EDT T1V) - these are quite interesting actually. Very comfortable, but the material of the A pads still has better quality. They do creak a little if I move my head in a specific way, but it doesn't bother me too much. And now the sound. To my non audiophile ears the sound is right between the A and B pads. Slightly more bass than the A pads got, but not as much as the B pads have. Midrange is present and doesn't feel recessed. With the B pads I felt the mids were a little overshadowed by the bass. Treble has slightly less emphasis than the one on the A pads, but still seems clearer than B. Although I have to admit that the B pads do the best job for taming the cymbals abuse in certain songs.
T1V are the ones I prefer right now.

This is fascinating, thanks for reporting! I’m still nervous to swap out my B pads; don’t want to break them!
 
Nov 11, 2017 at 10:08 AM Post #1,220 of 4,089

JensL

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A few weeks ago I went to a few local hifi stores with excellent selections of headphones.
I tested lots, for example Audeze LCD2 and LCD3, Hifiman HE400i and Ed.X V2, Focal Elear, Beyer Amiron, T1 G2, DT1770, DT1990 and 5 different Stax setups.

Long story short, I went home with the Beyerdynamic DT1990 Pro.
Great looks, amazing build quality and sounds better than my DT990-600 in just about every way.

Ok, the Stax SR-009 + SRM-T8000 setup sounded absolutely fantastic, but at nearly 10,000 USD, it's just too expensive.
The cheaper models (SR-L300, L500 and L700) sounds great too, but the build quality is utter crap. Cheap plastic that creaks and groans at the slightest head movement.

The Hifiman Edition X V2 was great too, but is absolutely not worth 3 times more than a DT1990.
The two Audezes had a sound signature that didn't suit me, but I understand why people like them.

So the DT1990 is pretty close to a perfect headphone for me.
However, the XLR plug annoyed me somewhat. When I'm relaxing and leaning back in my chair, the plug/cable rubs against my shoulder area. It's not a big issue, but I wanted to see if I could do something about it.

So I made a cable.

BeyerDT1990-plug1.jpgBeyerDT1990-plug2.jpg BeyerDT1990-plug3.jpg BeyerDT1990-plug4.jpg

It's just a short extension cable with a Switchcraft TARA3FX angled mini XLR at the headphone end.

This works great for my setup now. No more shoulder rubbing. :)

The 4th picture compares the stock plug and the Switchcraft one.

Beyerdynamic really made a great headphone here.
I might even get a DT1770 for those occasions when a closed construction is better.
Good stuff.
 
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Nov 11, 2017 at 10:36 AM Post #1,221 of 4,089

Chris1975

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A few weeks ago I went to a few local hifi stores with excellent selections of headphones.
I tested lots, for example Audeze LCD2 and LCD3, Hifiman HE400i and Ed.X V2, Focal Elear, Beyer Amiron, T1 G2, DT1770, DT1990 and 5 different Stax setups.

Long story short, I went home with the Beyerdynamic DT1990 Pro.
Great looks, amazing build quality and sounds better than my DT990-600 in just about every way.

Ok, the Stax SR-009 + SRM-T8000 setup sounded absolutely fantastic, but at nearly 10,000 USD, it's just too expensive.
The cheaper models (SR-L300, L500 and L700) sounds great too, but the build quality is utter crap. Cheap plastic that creaks and groans at the slightest head movement.

The Hifiman Edition X V2 was great too, but is absolutely not worth 3 times more than a DT1990.
The two Audezes had a sound signature that didn't suit me, but I understand why people like them.

So the DT1990 is pretty close to a perfect headphone for me.
However, the XLR plug annoyed me somewhat. When I'm relaxing and leaning back in my chair, the plug/cable rubs against my shoulder area. It's not a big issue, but I wanted to see if I could do something about it.

So I made a cable.



It's just a short extension cable with a Switchcraft TARA3FX angled mini XLR at the headphone end.

This works great for my setup now. No more shoulder rubbing. :)

The 4th picture compares the stock plug and the Switchcraft one.

Beyerdynamic really made a great headphone here.
I might even get a DT1770 for those occasions when a closed construction is better.
Good stuff.


Just how much better were the Stax than the DT1990s? Maybe in years to come I’ll be able to afford such cans, but for now I love my 1990s
 
Nov 11, 2017 at 10:54 AM Post #1,222 of 4,089

JensL

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Just how much better were the Stax than the DT1990s? Maybe in years to come I’ll be able to afford such cans, but for now I love my 1990s

Difficult to say, but I honestly wouldn't bother with the L300/L500/L700, unless you really want the electrostatic sound. I'm sure lot's of people will disagree.
When you're used to the Beyer build quality, the low-end Stax plastic just doesn't feel right.

But the SR-007 and 009 are great headphones.
If they're worth the extra cash compared to a DT1990 or T1, is up to you.
Electrostats can sound magical. I got Martin Logan speakers, so I know. :slight_smile:
 
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Nov 11, 2017 at 11:11 AM Post #1,223 of 4,089

imran27

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Just how much better were the Stax than the DT1990s? Maybe in years to come I’ll be able to afford such cans, but for now I love my 1990s
I just returned from a Headphone Connect event in Mumbai, soort if audiophile meet-up.

I own 1990 and I heard the L300.
They aren't exactly better overall. It is more clean and clear but I felt the bass and treble extension is lacking and also soundstage is just in your face. But instrument separation is damn precise.

Now, 1990 has both soundstage and precise imaging. This just makes it better for everything including music, movies and gaming.

Also, can't say for sure but I felt they aren't as revealing as the DT 1990.

TL;DR
I was afraid to listen to Stax SRS-3100 thinking that Iight regret buying DT 1990. After listening to the L300, no regrets. L300 is great, but 1990 are more resolving per me.

Also, got to hear HE500. Worthy contender against DT 1990, but they aren't exactly neutral so that's a toss up. They are sort of Musical.
 
Nov 11, 2017 at 11:13 AM Post #1,224 of 4,089

gibawe

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A few weeks ago I went to a few local hifi stores with excellent selections of headphones.
I tested lots, for example Audeze LCD2 and LCD3, Hifiman HE400i and Ed.X V2, Focal Elear, Beyer Amiron, T1 G2, DT1770, DT1990 and 5 different Stax setups.

Long story short, I went home with the Beyerdynamic DT1990 Pro.
Great looks, amazing build quality and sounds better than my DT990-600 in just about every way.

Ok, the Stax SR-009 + SRM-T8000 setup sounded absolutely fantastic, but at nearly 10,000 USD, it's just too expensive.
The cheaper models (SR-L300, L500 and L700) sounds great too, but the build quality is utter crap. Cheap plastic that creaks and groans at the slightest head movement.

The Hifiman Edition X V2 was great too, but is absolutely not worth 3 times more than a DT1990.
The two Audezes had a sound signature that didn't suit me, but I understand why people like them.

So the DT1990 is pretty close to a perfect headphone for me.
However, the XLR plug annoyed me somewhat. When I'm relaxing and leaning back in my chair, the plug/cable rubs against my shoulder area. It's not a big issue, but I wanted to see if I could do something about it.

So I made a cable.



It's just a short extension cable with a Switchcraft TARA3FX angled mini XLR at the headphone end.

This works great for my setup now. No more shoulder rubbing. :)

The 4th picture compares the stock plug and the Switchcraft one.

Beyerdynamic really made a great headphone here.
I might even get a DT1770 for those occasions when a closed construction is better.
Good stuff.

How can you compare beyer amiron home to the DT1990? What made you choose the 1990?
 
Nov 11, 2017 at 11:21 AM Post #1,225 of 4,089

JensL

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How can you compare beyer amiron home to the DT1990? What made you choose the 1990?

Good question.
The Amiron is really good, with a more relaxed and warm sound. Very comfortable to wear.
I was considering going for the Amiron, but the DT1990 had something I just liked a little more. Maybe some more details in the midrange.
You can't go wrong with either, in my opinion.
It's just a matter of taste.
 
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Nov 11, 2017 at 11:34 AM Post #1,226 of 4,089

gibawe

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Good question.
The Amiron is really good, with a more relaxed and warm sound. Very comfortable to wear.
I was considering going for the Amiron, but the DT1990 had something I just liked a little more. Maybe some more details in the midrange.
You can't go wrong with either, in my opinion.
It's just a matter of taste.

Nice, I think i'm leaning towards 1990, it will help with my decision. Thanks man :)
 
Nov 11, 2017 at 3:19 PM Post #1,227 of 4,089

Merkurio

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I was looking for a nice step-up for my actual gear and put the trigger on these after reading a lot of goodies regard to the sound and build quality (the price on Amazon IT helped, too).

My initial target was a TOTL closed headphone with nice soundstage and equilibrated sound (maybe a tad of aditional bass response) for classical, jazz, progressive rock, classic pop and a bit of everything, but then I realized a semi-open design would fit my needs without breaking my wallet.

I expect to recieve them next week, so I'll post my impressions drived with my new Magni 3.:)

Cheers.
 
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Nov 13, 2017 at 9:40 PM Post #1,228 of 4,089

ipm

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I have a DT1990, HD650, HD600, K712 and a few other headphones and earphones. I listen to the DT1990 with the analytical pads, the pads with fewer holes in them. I have had the DT1990 for a few months and the HD650 for years.

Overall, to my ears the DT1990 needs something like -3dB starting at about 8 or 9kHz and going up, and it could use about +3dB at about 80Hz moving down (I like bass when it is well done). This was close to my initial impression and this still holds for me.

Relative to the HD600 and the HD650, the DT1990 mids seem to be recessed but not to the point that this is annoying. Certain recordings, can however, sound a bit confused in the DT1990 due to the treble begin very much in front of the mids at certain points where perhaps this should not be obviously so.

The HD600 is smoother and has a much more natural treble. The DT1990 is a bit brighter but I can't say that its more detailed than the HD600. The HD600 treble is pretty detailed and well executed to me. I would not say the HD600 lack detail overall. Also, the mids seem more detailed in the HD600 and HD650. Right now, the bass in the DT1990 seems cleaner to me than in the HD650 bass in particular on some funk tracks I like. The DT1990 bass is fast, punchy, and well executed.

The soundstage in the DT1990 is wider than the the HD600 but its not nearly as wide as it is in the K712. The DT1990 images well but I perceive the HD650 to be more focused and precise in the center image when I listen to vocals on certain tracks. I am not sure if this is related to the DT1990 treble or not. The very wide K712 soundstage is a bit distracting to me at times where the K712 width comes off on certain recordings as being panned too far right or left if that makes any sense. This is certainly fun, but I like the DT1990 more in this respect, at least right now. The DT1990 is nicely wider than the HD600 and HD650. The DT1990 seems deeper as well, but I have not really figured this out yet. I'm not sure about taller yet either. I have some Chesky recordings coming to me that will help to figure out the height.

Personally, I would not give up an HD650 or an HD600 for a DT1990; however, I would not sell my DT1990 right now either. They are simply different headphones and it depends on what you are looking for.

For me the DT1990 delivers a balanced sound with a great bass (the main reason I purchased the DT1990), a wide soundstage, clear treble and good (but slightly recessed) mids with more energy in the treble than the HD600. The DT1990 with the analytical pads are good. If you can EQ them, the DT1990 are better.
 
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Nov 13, 2017 at 11:43 PM Post #1,229 of 4,089

abvolt

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Excellent impressions I have not yet tried the 1990's hope to get a pair sometime the first of the new year..enjoy
 
Nov 14, 2017 at 2:13 AM Post #1,230 of 4,089

imran27

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I was listening to a lot of acoustics and orchestral recordings since last couple of days (DT 1990 on A-pads) and noticed that the instrument timbre isn't as natural as it should be. Stax L300 were amazing in that regard and they had narrow soundstage. Wondering if soundstage affected the timbre I tried various tracks.

Observed that instruments farther away sound much thinner and have almost no timbre (compared to instruments that are closer).

A guy (from Audeze I guess) explained how FR can affect both timbre as well as soundstage and most of the time a narrower soundstage with proper FR results in an utmost natural instrument presentation.

I then changed to B-pads. Much better instrument presentation.

Did anybody else observe this?
 

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