Best possible head-fi setup with PC as source for techno/trance/electronica/d&b when money is not an option?
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Sil3nce

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NO! NO! NO!.
 
What's wrong here?. Most of these responses are biased, short, don't include an explanation of why those headphones should be chosen, and are fundamentally flawed. Remember what you're looking for is the most transparent and accurate sonic representation of any genre of music. Trust me you might think ground-shaking bass and sparking treble is great for trance/electronic but neutral is much better.. I might also point out if you think the medium lacks lower-end decay and presence then it's probably not because it's too neutral but analytical/thin (Which is colored, yet commonly considered equivalent with neutrality)
 
So once again, if the music genres you listen to are already packed full of elevated synth beats and progressive notes with an emphasis on the lower end then don't bother with a colored headphone with the same sound signature. If you're going to buy sony bass monsters or ultrasones do realize in less than one month you'll be looking for better. Especially with your budget. So please keep that in mind. Don't make the same mistake I did haha. Start out cheap and neutral and slowly configure your system to obtain the sound you desire. Don't jump in with a 1k can like the hd800s and start searching for an amp. Try to keep an open mind but make sure you know what you're getting into first. Audio is a process . It's better to gradually gain more knowledge and fiddle around with equipment. Why not look around at some well-known reviewers with the same music preference and see what cans they own. For me the Sennheiser Hd-600 has never disappointed.
 
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Sil3nce

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Quote:
I'm assuming you have minimal experience with headphones. Correct me if I'm wrong.
However, should my assumption hold true, I admit you've piqued my curiosity. Why are you willing to spend 10,000USD on headphones when you've only an ounce (if even that) of experience with them? Doesn't that strike you as even remotely daft? Start entry-level, familiarize yourself with the headphones you buy as they'll become your references, and educate yourself using these references. You'll appreciate your climb to the summit of high fidelity ineffably more since you'll understand high fidelity, and you've little chance that you'll waste your hard-earned dough on headphones that you bought b/c a stranger told you they were the Holy Grail. Considering your preferences, I recommend the Ultrasone HFI-580.
 
If I've assumed incorrectly, I retract all that I've said, but I implore you to offer a better reference next time - namely one that involves headphones, not speakers.
heh, exactly what i was thinking. He's willing to break the bank without testing the waters first. 
I posted before reading this. 
 
Great advice nom. And people would do well to heed it.
 
So what if you have enough money to buy anything you want. So what if you didn't fall into the general consumer category with Bose/w.e. It doesn't mean you can instantly become an audiophile in a day just because you ordered something targeted towards them. Experience!
 
 
 
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Sil3nce

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http://www.head-fi.org/forum/thread/564465/misconception-of-neutral-accurate
 
Do take a look at this. Quite interesting.
 
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deadlylover

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+1 on the LCD-2 recommendation. They are pretty much what you are looking for from your description. I've had them for a while, they do very well with the doof doof doof, with their ruler flat bass response and satisfying levels of impact. They're also a little soft on the treble, what the bloody hell are you waiting for?

 
If you can find a good deal on them used in the for sale forums, I don't think you will have much trouble selling it later on, as any of the recent ortho's seem to be one of the more popular upgrade paths from someone moving on from mid-fi.
 
It's just gear man, go buy something and move on if it ain't your cup of tea. You may lose a little money here and there from letting cans come and go, but that's a fair price for being able to take your time listening to a piece of gear.
 
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KingStyles

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I agree that the lcd2 is a good start for that type of music. I would look at the newer "rev2" version which has better highs, soundstage, and transparency while still maintaining great tight bass. I am not sure the characteristics of those speakers or amp, so maybe if you tell us a little more what your preferences in the type sound you like, we might be able to suggest amps and dacs that will fit your taste in different price categories.
 
The best thing you could do is go to a local meet or at least see if there is anybody in your area that would be willing to let you listen to different cans. The headphone choice will be the most crucial choice of the setup because it makes the most change on the sound signature. If you can try to buy used so you dont lose anything if you dont like it.Dont worry about looking like a snob or anything. We are all looking for what will make us sonically happy with in our budgets.
 
Welcome to Head-fi.
 
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jronan2

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If I were you I wouldn't even consider the Pro 900, I had them think they get a lot more credit than they really should. The d7000 is way better for EDM and I have the LCD 2 rev 1 with a brightish dac that really sounds great. I would go with either the D7K or LCD 2 either version, and a HA 160 amp. Lots of power and thump. Wish I could afford one right now.
 
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Sil3nce

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Quote:
If I were you I wouldn't even consider the Pro 900, I had them think they get a lot more credit than they really should. The d7000 is way better for EDM and I have the LCD 2 rev 1 with a brightish dac that really sounds great. I would go with either the D7K or LCD 2 either version, and a HA 160 amp. Lots of power and thump. Wish I could afford one right now.


+1
 
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zhunter

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I mainly listen to trance, electro as well as melodic death metal, and the combo of LCD-2 ver 2 & Schiit Lyr with CCa tubes are just terrific! Highly recommended!

 
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Sil3nce

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Quote:
I mainly listen to trance, electro as well as melodic death metal, and the combo of LCD-2 ver 2 & Schiit Lyr with CCa tubes are just terrific! Highly recommended!

More peeps in the lcd-2 boat haha. 
quit tempting me to get into orthos
 
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jronan2

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Yeah I was also going to say the Lyr which is a great amp for the money, but since price wouldn't be an issue I would go with the burson. LCD 2 has the best bass I ever heard, mine is rev 1 I heard rev. 2 was just as good, if not better. But be careful about the rev 2 hype, there are still a number of head fier's here that still prefer the rev. 1's. I haven't tried the rev. 2 so I won't comment on that. The denons don't come close to the LCD 2 in terms of midrange, which is very important I found out with EDM music, and all music in general. But the D7k has such a distinct sound sig to my ears lots of sub bass and just a clubbish attitude towards it, my favorite for EDM, with the LCD 2's being a very close second. LCD 2 is by far the better all around headphone not even debatable. Just do what I did, buy both, get a nice rig and call it a day lol
 
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djviciouscycle

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I'm not going to make a recommendation, but I will say, if you want the best, go for the best.
 
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Psychochink

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I have to say, as somebody who is interested in listening to high-quality audio, but not particularly interested in the minutiae involved in becoming an 'expert' (even if we're talking just an expert on my particular ears), I fundamentally disagree with a lot of what's being said here.
 
Many people are advising that the OP start cheap, and then work his way up to a better and better rig, so that he can build up his knowledge and go through the 'journey' of high-end audio, so that's he'll 'appreciate' it more - as if somehow that will result in a better outcome at the end.
 
For many of the people here, exploring audio is a hobby. The endless trialling of this headphone and that, this amplifier and that, in order to find the 'perfect' sound. I both understand and appreciate that outlook. I grew up with a serious audiophile for a father, in fact - the kind of man who would have Duntech Sovereigns in the lounge room but yet still bought other speakers so that he could listen to the performance differences.
 
For others, like myself and most likely the OP, what we're interested in is finding the most suitable high-end audio equipment to suit our own personal tastes...but if an extra year or two of trialing different setups might have resulted in a 5% better sound, it's frankly not a concern, because we're already listening to such exceptional audio that the difference is negligible at best. The primary outcome of all that testing would just equate to a lot of time wasted, and a lot more money spent.
 
To put it another way, let's say somebody is in the market for a high-performance car. Would you recommend that they start off with a bunch of $50k cars, then try out a few $100k cars - all the while finding out the exact type of driving characteristics that they consider 'perfect' - then eventually buying the $250k Ferrari/Lambourghini/Pagani/McLaren that best suits them (because they all do drive differently)? In a perfect world where people have unlimited time and money - yes, of course. In the real world, that's another story...
 
I think that's where a lot of the serious enthusiasts miss the point. For them, it's all about the journey, and more power to them because they're doing something that makes them happy, I am in no way saying that's the 'wrong' approach. But for others it's about the goal, and trying to push your personal perspective on those people and/or somehow looking down on them because they don't 'get it' as much as you do is not what people should be doing.
 
The man has asked for advice. Maybe he hasn't asked exactly the right questions, maybe the way he's approaching his goals aren't exactly the best way to achieve the outcomes he wants. By all means, let him know that and correct him. But saying that he shouldn't buy high-end audio equipment because somehow he won't appreciate it as much as if he devoted large amounts of time to building his 'perfect' setup smacks of snobbery. Maybe he won't be able to pick up some of the differences between a $500 setup and a $3000 setup that others could...but that doesn't mean he won't appreciate the increase in quality.
 
[By the way, lest some people in this thread think I'm overreacting a bit and jumping on them, this is only partially directed at you - it's just a somewhat recurring theme around here that I have noticed and am taking this opportunity to highlight.]
 
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HesterDW

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Quote:
NO! NO! NO!.
 
What's wrong here?. Most of these responses are biased, short, don't include an explanation of why those headphones should be chosen, and are fundamentally flawed. Remember what you're looking for is the most transparent and accurate sonic representation of any genre of music. Trust me you might think ground-shaking bass and sparking treble is great for trance/electronic but neutral is much better.. I might also point out if you think the medium lacks lower-end decay and presence then it's probably not because it's too neutral but analytical/thin (Which is colored, yet commonly considered equivalent with neutrality)
 
So once again, if the music genres you listen to are already packed full of elevated synth beats and progressive notes with an emphasis on the lower end then don't bother with a colored headphone with the same sound signature. If you're going to buy sony bass monsters or ultrasones do realize in less than one month you'll be looking for better. Especially with your budget. So please keep that in mind. Don't make the same mistake I did haha. Start out cheap and neutral and slowly configure your system to obtain the sound you desire. Don't jump in with a 1k can like the hd800s and start searching for an amp. Try to keep an open mind but make sure you know what you're getting into first. Audio is a process . It's better to gradually gain more knowledge and fiddle around with equipment. Why not look around at some well-known reviewers with the same music preference and see what cans they own. For me the Sennheiser Hd-600 has never disappointed.

Most responses are biased, including this. No one is wrong because he or she prefers emphasized bass.
 
With that budget I would try multiple sonic signatures. Neutral and colored to find out what I liked. 
 
 
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Sil3nce

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Quote:
I have to say, as somebody who is interested in listening to high-quality audio, but not particularly interested in the minutiae involved in becoming an 'expert' (even if we're talking just an expert on my particular ears), I fundamentally disagree with a lot of what's being said here.
 
Many people are advising that the OP start cheap, and then work his way up to a better and better rig, so that he can build up his knowledge and go through the 'journey' of high-end audio, so that's he'll 'appreciate' it more - as if somehow that will result in a better outcome at the end.
 
For many of the people here, exploring audio is a hobby. The endless trialling of this headphone and that, this amplifier and that, in order to find the 'perfect' sound. I both understand and appreciate that outlook. I grew up with a serious audiophile for a father, in fact - the kind of man who would have Duntech Sovereigns in the lounge room but yet still bought other speakers so that he could listen to the performance differences.
 
For others, like myself and most likely the OP, what we're interested in is finding the most suitable high-end audio equipment to suit our own personal tastes...but if an extra year or two of trialing different setups might have resulted in a 5% better sound, it's frankly not a concern, because we're already listening to such exceptional audio that the difference is negligible at best. The primary outcome of all that testing would just equate to a lot of time wasted, and a lot more money spent.
 
To put it another way, let's say somebody is in the market for a high-performance car. Would you recommend that they start off with a bunch of $50k cars, then try out a few $100k cars - all the while finding out the exact type of driving characteristics that they consider 'perfect' - then eventually buying the $250k Ferrari/Lambourghini/Pagani/McLaren that best suits them (because they all do drive differently)? In a perfect world where people have unlimited time and money - yes, of course. In the real world, that's another story...
 
I think that's where a lot of the serious enthusiasts miss the point. For them, it's all about the journey, and more power to them because they're doing something that makes them happy, I am in no way saying that's the 'wrong' approach. But for others it's about the goal, and trying to push your personal perspective on those people and/or somehow looking down on them because they don't 'get it' as much as you do is not what people should be doing.
 
The man has asked for advice. Maybe he hasn't asked exactly the right questions, maybe the way he's approaching his goals aren't exactly the best way to achieve the outcomes he wants. By all means, let him know that and correct him. But saying that he shouldn't buy high-end audio equipment because somehow he won't appreciate it as much as if he devoted large amounts of time to building his 'perfect' setup smacks of snobbery. Maybe he won't be able to pick up some of the differences between a $500 setup and a $3000 setup that others could...but that doesn't mean he won't appreciate the increase in quality.
 
[By the way, lest some people in this thread think I'm overreacting a bit and jumping on them, this is only partially directed at you - it's just a somewhat recurring theme around here that I have noticed and am taking this opportunity to highlight.]

Sigh. And this is why to this day the head-fi aficionados and well-respected members tend to stay the heck out of these type of threads.
You sir quite obviously have trouble understanding that there's a difference between people who can afford expensive audio equipment simply because they can with people who have worked their whole lives to achieve that perfect sound signature. How do you know something suits you until you've tried everything else, or at least a vast majority?
And you're analogy is fundamentally flawed. More expensive does not equal better. And it's only a few individuals who said he shouldn't buy high-end equipment. We're not saying anything of the compulsory sort. It's just advice. There's plenty of people here recommending lcd2s. Are you saying those aren't high end? Additionally, in terms of technical proficiency and standards of measurement where on earth did you get that 5 percent ratio?
 
Snobbery?
 
Speaking of which, that was a poorly played car analogy. I dare to presume you actually own a car of that caliber? Or that you have actually witnessed that meager 5 percent increase of experience. For the audiophile it's not as much as the overall result of the sound but the enjoyment of our journey and our own personal satisfaction of the end result. We try to pass this on to future headfi-ers. If everyone was as financially blessed as the OP then why not recommend everyone to buy Sennheiser Orpheus. Who is going to review the lower-end cans/iems. It's called respecting the less privileged. Do well to follow that before bringing up analogies of exotic cars.
 
Speaking of which you obviously have no clue what you're talking about. More expensive cars are not performance wise better (Koenigsegg ccx, Zonda) than say a tuned 100k gtr v spec. You're prices are wrong too. 250k for a Zonda or a Mclaren? Lamborghini hasn't been spelled lambourghini since the dark ages. But that's not my point.
 
Why do people buy those cars then? It's because they can for the status symbol. (Which I'm sure many people on this forum do to concerning headphones. Just to tote and say I own hd800s or what-not.) The other half assume the more expensive rarer cars are much better and they enjoy it thoroughly and blissfully unaware. But how can they ever know their own preference through just one exotic car? Are they expected to read reviews online and believe it instantly, shelling out half a million without even test-driving the car? I only say this because I currently have a rolls-royce phantom and a lamborghini gallardo in my garage.
 
Did my family buy them for the performance? No. They bought it for the status. That being said, don't lead him on the wrong path.
 
 

Please don't post these type of posts next time unless you're looking to incense people into an argument.
 
 
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Sil3nce

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Quote:
Most responses are biased, including this. No one is wrong because he or she prefers emphasized bass.
 
With that budget I would try multiple sonic signatures. Neutral and colored to find out what I liked. 
 


Nice logical fallacy. I didn't say they're wrong. They're just misinformed. That's the point of infatique's thread on the misconception. How can you know what you like until you've experienced everything else? So please don't target me but target the people who give a one phrase response with no explanation. At least I'm actually taking my time.
 
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