Beginning Runners
Jul 20, 2010 at 5:48 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 17

logwed

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Hey guys, I have recently (read: 2 hours ago) started running. I'm a pretty athletic guy, just graduated from HS lettering in tennis and soccer for the past couple years, and I've always had to do running for practice. However, now that I'm not on a team, I have no one to guide my running. I haven't run in a couple months, so the 4 today I did was killer, and I had to stop and walk for about 150 yards about 3 miles in. Am I going about this the right way, just plunging right into it? I ran with a more experienced buddy today, and my shoes are decent. 
 
Would anyone like to share they're beginning experiences with running? I'm not going to become a super-runner, I think, just a way to stay in shape.
 
Jul 20, 2010 at 8:02 PM Post #2 of 17

nealric

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Ramp up slowly. 4 miles is too much for just starting out. You may be in good enough cardio shape, but your joints and balance muscles need time to build up. Start at 2 miles and slowly ramp up from there- hold yourself back even if you are feeling good. Too much too fast will lead to injury. 
 
Although not universally accepted, I heartily recommend looking into barefoot running style. This means running in minimalist shoes (like the Vibram 5-fingers) instead of normal padded running shoes. I developed a lot of pain from running until I switched to barefoot running. 
 
Jul 20, 2010 at 9:03 PM Post #3 of 17

hembergler

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Start off really slowly, both in terms of adding distance and actual speed. When I first started running I did a very productive and manageable six months or so. I took a few months off (winter) to pursue other things and came back into running way too quickly come springtime. I could handle it aerobically, but my body had forgotten what it was like to take so much impact for such long periods of time, and I developed some nasty shin splints as a result. That was really, really not fun.
 
Having good shoes is good, but make sure they're also the right shoes. Go to a running store and make sure they check out your gait to make sure you have appropriate footwear in case you have pronation/suppination, or in case you have normal feet and the wrong shoes!
 
So, again, just be careful and take it easy. If you can, running in the woods also lessens impact, helps balance and is super fun.
 
Also, you might want to get a Nike+ wristband or iPod connection since having a way to log runs is really entertaining (hey, for me at least!) and serves as good motivation. It also comes with some programs online that can help you ease into running safely and sanely.
 
Long may you run!
 
Jul 20, 2010 at 9:17 PM Post #4 of 17

dziendobry

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I will throw in my .02, Start slow, don't worry if you need to walk some of the time, run every other day and take a off day once a week.  If you get into too fast you will injure yourself.  There are plenty of places on the web to help you figure out how much to ramp up your mileage, at one point I ran a marathon, I am far from that now.  I like the couch to 5k pod cast running program, that has helped me ramp back up slowly.  As far as shoes go, read "Born to Run" by Chris McDougal It changed everything I believed about running and what I ran in and why.  I run in very minimalist shoes if I run in them at all and have a forefoot rather then a heel strike.
 
Links:
 
http://harvardscience.harvard.edu/foundations/articles/barefoot-running-easier-feet-running-shoes
 
http://birthdayshoes.com/edward-edmond-s-minimalist-approach-to-marathon-training-utilizes-barefoot-running-and-racing-flats
 
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=running+barefoot&aq=f&aqi=g10&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=
 
Happy Trails
 
Jul 20, 2010 at 9:42 PM Post #5 of 17

virometal

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Here's my advice. Don't worry about starting too fast. You're young. Run until shin splints baybe!! Skip the DAP. Instead hit the public trails, tune into your body, listen to the noise of life, and make eye contact with the hot girls.
 
Running isn't very complicated, but of course one may geek out like any other hobby.
 
Jul 20, 2010 at 9:49 PM Post #6 of 17

hembergler

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Quote:
Here's my advice. Don't worry about starting too fast. You're young. Run until shin splints baybe!!


For whatever it's worth, I was 16 when I screwed up my shins by going too hard again. Wish youth could have prevented that fiasco
frown.gif

 
Jul 20, 2010 at 11:41 PM Post #8 of 17

logwed

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Quote:
Ramp up slowly. 4 miles is too much for just starting out. You may be in good enough cardio shape, but your joints and balance muscles need time to build up. Start at 2 miles and slowly ramp up from there- hold yourself back even if you are feeling good. Too much too fast will lead to injury. 
 


During my run today the muscles above my knees seemed very tired and sore towards the end. Is that the kind of running-specific muscle issue that you're talking about? I think that I will be taking it a bit slower from now on, I didn't want to seem like a wimp in front of my friend, who is a much more experienced runner.

 
Quote:
Here's my advice. Don't worry about starting too fast. You're young. Run until shin splints baybe!! Skip the DAP. Instead hit the public trails, tune into your body, listen to the noise of life, and make eye contact with the hot girls.
 
Running isn't very complicated, but of course one may geek out like any other hobby.


Oh, there were definitely some cuties today :wink:
 
Jul 21, 2010 at 12:20 AM Post #9 of 17

semisight

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Quote:
During my run today the muscles above my knees seemed very tired and sore towards the end. Is that the kind of running-specific muscle issue that you're talking about? I think that I will be taking it a bit slower from now on, I didn't want to seem like a wimp in front of my friend, who is a much more experienced runner.

Oh, there were definitely some cuties today :wink:


Right above your knees? Maybe a tendon? Always stretch after you run. Like, really stretch, don't half ass it. Then take a hot shower to relax your muscles. The combination of the two really helps. As for pain, last year in cross country was the first time I took running seriously. There were days I was in so much pain near the end I had to take a 2 minute sitting break after I finished. Push it. My pain tolerance after the first few weeks grew markedly, and that's what you want. Running is as much mental as physical; once you know your body you can really find your limits.
 
On a lighter note, that's right son 
biggrin.gif
.
 
Jul 21, 2010 at 12:58 AM Post #10 of 17

JadeEast

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ICE your knees right after every run and eat something to recover as soon as you can. There is a small window of time where you can refuel really effectively post run, 30 mins or so (mmm chocolate milk).
 
Right now you need to concentrate on building your time on your feet forget milage, speed and ego.
You have to build your aerobic base first everything else comes from that. You need to run pretty slow to do this, go slow now to go fast later. You should be able to talk or just breath through your nose. Build up the amount of time you can stay on your feet at this pace. Doing this builds your aerobic capacity and this will let you get faster later. This should be the majority of your running time right now. 
 
 
You don't get stronger or fitter while you're doing exercise it's when you recover and absorb the exercise that this happens. 
 
As far as the minimalist shoe thing all I will say is that the shoes aren't magic and you can over do it in those shoes as well.
 
 
Jul 21, 2010 at 1:05 AM Post #11 of 17

semisight

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I'll agree with that to a point. According to the crossfit community, anaerobic exercise trumps aerobic exercise. Once you've mastered 3, 4 mile runs, make those your longer runs. Run on the track a lot, do reps of sprints. Practice pacing on long runs and do slow and fast intervals.
 
Jul 21, 2010 at 1:19 AM Post #12 of 17

JadeEast

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There is allot that could be said about the crossfit community but lets not get into that vortex. I don't discount the usefulness of anaerobic fitness but the reality is that most running is aerobic and a beginner needs to build a base. Once an aerobic base is built then lactate threshold and anaerobic training can really do their thing. 
 
 
Quote:
I'll agree with that to a point. According to the crossfit community, anaerobic exercise trumps aerobic exercise. Once you've mastered 3, 4 mile runs, make those your longer runs. Run on the track a lot, do reps of sprints. Practice pacing on long runs and do slow and fast intervals.



 
Jul 21, 2010 at 2:21 AM Post #13 of 17

semisight

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Never said I did crossfit (I really don't have the time to learn). It certainly isn't the end all be all. I agree about the base. Then working on pacing and speed becomes more important.
 
Jul 21, 2010 at 11:28 AM Post #14 of 17

nealric

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 According to the crossfit community, anaerobic exercise trumps aerobic exercise.
 
I don't think there is a one-size fits all type of exercise. It depends on your fitness goals. Do you want to run an Ironman Triathlon or do you want to bench 300lbs? Do you want to look good with your shirt off or do you want to stave off a family history of heart trouble? 
 
 During my run today the muscles above my knees seemed very tired and sore towards the end. Is that the kind of running-specific muscle issue that you're talking about? I think that I will be taking it a bit slower from now on, I didn't want to seem like a wimp in front of my friend, who is a much more experienced runner.
 
Don't worry about looking like a wimp. The muscles above your knees are just some of many that needs time to get built up. The good news is that if you keep at it you can start ramping up relatively quickly. You should be good to run a fast 5 miles within 3 months or so. 
 
Jul 26, 2010 at 5:54 PM Post #15 of 17

logwed

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Ok, today I went on a shorter run than the routine I did last week, and then did several 75 yd. sprints on the track afterwards. I did this based on the recommendation of a friend, and I just wanted to run it past the extremely knowledgeable head-fi hive mind before I did it again.
 

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