Before the Music Dies.
Jul 1, 2009 at 2:37 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 23

Jahn

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Jul 1, 2009 at 2:49 AM Post #2 of 23

Zarathustra19

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yup, I actually bought this about a year ago, very eye opening film
 
Jul 1, 2009 at 5:44 AM Post #5 of 23

cerbie

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Never heard of it before. But...
BEST
INTRO
EVER
 
Jul 1, 2009 at 7:50 AM Post #7 of 23

cerbie

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Yup, same thing, just a bit lower quality.
 
Jul 1, 2009 at 1:35 PM Post #9 of 23

DoKwan

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I have watched my young daughters generations musical taste and background dictated by the Disney Channel.

It makes me nauseous.

(But isn't the the duty of every childs music to make their parents nauseous??)
 
Jul 1, 2009 at 2:23 PM Post #10 of 23

EnOYiN

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Quote:

Originally Posted by CDBacklash /img/forum/go_quote.gif
what the hell is this pretentious crap.
1/5. Not worth the watch. Severely limited scope.



Great stuff. Is that the way you judge every film and musical album?

Quote:

Originally Posted by DoKwan /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I have watched my young daughters generations musical taste and background dictated by the Disney Channel.

It makes me nauseous.

(But isn't the the duty of every childs music to make their parents nauseous??)



I guess that's why I'm planning on not having children. Ever.

As for the film. I think the music will survive because of the internet. I have access to pretty much every obscure band, I can find radio stations which are playing good music if I'm inclined to. I haven't watched TV at home for about 4 years now and I don't miss it a single bit. There is simply no need anymore. Why would I want to watch that gameshow anyway? Why bother with Britneys (or whoevers) new single if I know I'm not going to like it? I can find real music made by real artists everywhere.

I think that's the main thing I'm trying to get across here. Radio and TV are starting to lose to the internet. People can make there own descisions again without the influence of some recordcompany telling us what to like and what to dislike.
 
Jul 1, 2009 at 2:41 PM Post #11 of 23

CDBacklash

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Quote:

Originally Posted by EnOYiN /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Great stuff. Is that the way you judge every film and musical album?


I think being pretentious is a great thing, but only when it results in greatness.
This film suffers from mediocrity and severe underachievement, IMO.
It's just plain wrong and is trying to be clever, without ever being intelligent.

Coltrane was extremely ambitious and bordering on pretension. I remember reading in a biography that he wanted to play the saxophone "so fast that it sounded like chords". The result? Greatness. Not because he played fast, but because of the fire that was inside of him because of his failures, his desires and his life.

This film quite frankly has nothing and by contrast to Coltrane is dragonforce at best.

I seriously cant get over how incorrect the film is. If you want to hear music, go out and listen to it. If you dont like the music being made, make your own music. If you dont like new music, listen to old music.
Music has existed for a long long time and isnt about to fade out just because of capitalism.
Music will live as long as man lives, and as long as many other life forms exist.
Pressed CDs arent suddenly going to vanish because this film thinks music will die. People arent going to stop ENJOYING listening to or playing music just because the film says so. I know I most certainly will not stop until I die.
Tangential pseudo-intellectualism has its place, and it doesn't belong in "eye-opening films". Pop music isnt the only artform. Music is a medium for enjoyment, so long as people are enjoying music on the grounds of listening and playing i honestly dont give a **** what critics with "golden ears" think.
 
Jul 1, 2009 at 3:15 PM Post #12 of 23

Jahn

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I actually thought it was eye opening when it came to the past, present and future of the music industry. Not music, the music industry. As Questlove said in the doc, is it commercial, or is it art? The industry should be commercial, the music should be art. The two should have a healthy interaction of course, but these days the music championed by the industry is commercial to the point of pain.

The documentary also goes into how the industry is being sidestepped (internet exposure, free or not), and how it should learn a lesson from that and embrace those avenues. I'm not certain if it's too late for this to happen or not, honestly.

As far as pretension goes, Radiohead's In Rainbows commercial enterprise was a form of successful pretension. Can it be the model for the future, for acts that aren't already big enough to survive such a model? Who knows but we'll see. In the meantime I'll keep discovering new/old acts online and running out and buying the HiFi versions (if available, which sadly is becoming rarer and rarer, especially with hot mastering and out of print stuff) when it builds critical mass in my brain.
 
Jul 1, 2009 at 3:23 PM Post #13 of 23

CDBacklash

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I agree with what the film was saying about the music industry, but I don't think it was particularly groundbreaking and a number of people could have told you what the film said in a much shorter time.
My main quaff with the film is the title. Theres just no need for it.
The pity angle at the front of the film was not necessary either. He could have dedicated the film to those past, he didnt need to talk about how everyone around him dies. That was just him trying to appeal to a mainstream audience and it made the film overwhelmingly "indie hollywood" (think donnie darko). Oh well.

Regardless of what the industry does, theres a large number of people enjoying music outside of major labels with good results. The main problem with the industry is the cash they earn for what they do, and what they do with the sound of the music. Not what they are marketing, IMO.
Talent is always better in person than it is on album. Theres plenty of talent still around.
I dont particularly care if the person on the album is hugely skilled or not, so long as it sounds good and the music is good.
I cant say the same thing for a live performance, though.
Getting back to the film, its a good conversation point. I feel however this is only the case because of my interest in the subject, and not the excellence of the film which i believe is just not there.
 
Jul 1, 2009 at 5:01 PM Post #14 of 23

EnOYiN

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CDBacklash, my remark was more pointed toward the fact that you only watched 1/5 of the whole ordeal. A very cynical joke attempt you might call it.

Anyways, like you I believe that the film wasn't all that great and maybe a little too negative. However, I also think that this film was made for all those people who don't know. Posting on Head-Fi makes the chances of being a music lover and being familiar with different kinds of music quite a bit greater I think. Most of the people here don't just listen to the mainstream music - I can't support that with facts, but I get the impression it's true nonetheless.

I think that if you're that girl who says: "Bob Dylan? Who's that?" and you watch this film you might get more of an eye-opener than most of the population on Head-Fi. If you've never heard of other bands than the crap which is being shoved down your throat by your favorite TV station than how do you search for them on the internet?

Now I can imagine you thinking something along the lines of: "How on earth did you miss Bob Dylan or Pink Floyd or the Beatles or whatever?" but I know from my own experience that people can actually miss them.

I have been working with a lot guys which are about 10 years younger than me. They came for a month there to learn some stuff and after that a new group came and so on. I used to bring a harddisk to work to play my own music there. Of all the guys who came and went there were only 3 who knew a little more about music than just what the popular bands put out there days. Most of them had never heard of The Who or The Doors or Bob Dylan.

I think this is where the music might die - although I don't consider it likely. If that generation (or maybe even most of my own generation) raises their children, what will those guys and girls listen to when they grow up? Robert Johnson? Marvin Gaye? I think not. Britney? Let's hope not.
 

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