Audio Jack lifespan
Jun 9, 2015 at 12:00 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 23

Quandayhihi

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So I want to ask you guys since I've been searching and no one had answered this question yet: How long is a lifespan of an audio jack ( not the one attached to the headphone, but the hole where you put your jack in) ?
 
Jun 9, 2015 at 11:00 AM Post #2 of 23

KG Jag

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Of course that depends on multiple factors.  These include, but are not limited to the quality of the jack; how much and how roughly it is used; and the type of jack.
 
I have a headphone jack on my first stereo receiver that still works--it's a Pioneer from 1971.
 
Jun 9, 2015 at 10:23 PM Post #3 of 23

Quandayhihi

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  Of course that depends on multiple factors.  These include, but are not limited to the quality of the jack; how much and how roughly it is used; and the type of jack.
 
I have a headphone jack on my first stereo receiver that still works--it's a Pioneer from 1971.

Um, "how much" means plug it in and out a lot?  Wow I don't know there're different types of jack
 
Jun 9, 2015 at 10:56 PM Post #4 of 23

KG Jag

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  Of course that depends on multiple factors.  These include, but are not limited to the quality of the jack; how much and how roughly it is used; and the type of jack.
 
I have a headphone jack on my first stereo receiver that still works--it's a Pioneer from 1971.

Um, "how much" means plug it in and out a lot?  
 
Yes--how often this is done.
 
Wow I don't know there're different types of jack

 
Jun 10, 2015 at 1:22 AM Post #7 of 23

ProtegeManiac

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There's no real way to know, it's not like Neutrik performs tests and rates their jacks with thrust in-pull out cycles (man, that sounds wrong) the way batteries are rated for charging cycles.
 
Coincidentally, even if batteries are rated for that, I don't remember any battery lasting for as long as they're rated for before my phone's battery starts bloating. When they conduct these tests, they have to isolate other factors as per scientific methods, which means that heat is barely taken into account in the process in terms of real world use: the batteries are in a cold laboratory instead of in a phone that is sometimes in the pockets or bag of someone living in a tropical country where the heat index a couple of weeks ago was 51deg C (and then add how much the phone heats up when mobile internet is used). If you do the same for jacks, they would use a robot mechanism to make the thrust in and pull out motions consistent and therefore quantitatively comparable, and the reality is that such a machine will never at any point be in a hurry for any reason.
 
Jun 10, 2015 at 1:35 AM Post #8 of 23

Quandayhihi

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You have provided no information about what product this is.
 
General advice: do it as little as possible.

I use the Fiio X1
 
There's no real way to know, it's not like Neutrik performs tests and rates their jacks with thrust in-pull out cycles (man, that sounds wrong) the way batteries are rated for charging cycles.
 
Coincidentally, even if batteries are rated for that, I don't remember any battery lasting for as long as they're rated for before my phone's battery starts bloating. When they conduct these tests, they have to isolate other factors as per scientific methods, which means that heat is barely taken into account in the process in terms of real world use: the batteries are in a cold laboratory instead of in a phone that is sometimes in the pockets or bag of someone living in a tropical country where the heat index a couple of weeks ago was 51deg C (and then add how much the phone heats up when mobile internet is used). If you do the same for jacks, they would use a robot mechanism to make the thrust in and pull out motions consistent and therefore quantitatively comparable, and the reality is that such a machine will never at any point be in a hurry for any reason.

Yeah, I haven't seen or read about problems with the jack. I just want to use it properly so it can last longer since I'm just a highschool student on a budget
 
Jun 10, 2015 at 1:54 AM Post #9 of 23

ProtegeManiac

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Yeah, I haven't seen or read about problems with the jack. I just want to use it properly so it can last longer since I'm just a highschool student on a budget

 
Pull it gently and straight, that's about it. Maybe buy  some kind of rubber plug designed for 3.5mm jacks in case humidity is high where you are (even then, I'd have to admit I haven't actually seen one rusting or growing mold/fungi).
 
Jun 10, 2015 at 10:51 AM Post #10 of 23

Quandayhihi

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Pull it gently and straight, that's about it. Maybe buy  some kind of rubber plug designed for 3.5mm jacks in case humidity is high where you are (even then, I'd have to admit I haven't actually seen one rusting or growing mold/fungi).

Actually I live in VN, which is a tropical climate country. The plug on the Fiio X1 seems pretty rough so I did pull it out straight but had to add a bit force to it. Would that be a deal ?
 
Jun 10, 2015 at 1:22 PM Post #11 of 23

ProtegeManiac

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  Actually I live in VN, which is a tropical climate country. The plug on the Fiio X1 seems pretty rough so I did pull it out straight but had to add a bit force to it. Would that be a deal ?

 
As long as it's straight it shouldn't be a problem. The benefit to a tighter-fitting plug is that it also moves around less, so likely less friction wear.
 
Jun 10, 2015 at 1:50 PM Post #12 of 23

LNuneek

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I wouldn't be too concerned the only headphone jack I ever had a problem with is an old iPod classic. The prongs inside the jack got bent and only one channel worked after that. That was primarily from abuse though. I used to use it constantly at home and in the car. Home wasn't an issue, but constantly switching out the aux cable so me and my  girlfriend could take turns playing aux DJ in the car took it's toll. It took that abuse for like 6 years though. 
 
Jun 10, 2015 at 7:48 PM Post #13 of 23

Quandayhihi

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As long as it's straight it shouldn't be a problem. The benefit to a tighter-fitting plug is that it also moves around less, so likely less friction wear.

It's a good point. I have never thought of it.
  I wouldn't be too concerned the only headphone jack I ever had a problem with is an old iPod classic. The prongs inside the jack got bent and only one channel worked after that. That was primarily from abuse though. I used to use it constantly at home and in the car. Home wasn't an issue, but constantly switching out the aux cable so me and my  girlfriend could take turns playing aux DJ in the car took it's toll. It took that abuse for like 6 years though. 

So it took that much abuse for constantly 6 years? I guess my X1 would be fine until I got a job :)
 
Jun 10, 2015 at 7:52 PM Post #14 of 23

LNuneek

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  It's a good point. I have never thought of it.
So it took that much abuse for constantly 6 years? I guess my X1 would be fine until I got a job :)


Yeah, I forgot to mention that wasn't the only abuse either. I once accidentally dropped the ipod with my M50 plugged in and it landed right on the headphone jack. I still have a little damage on my M50 plug because of that. It looks like little tiny teeth marks in the metal. Didn't affect the sound of the headphones at all. It was quite a drop though to actually dent that metal.
 
Jun 11, 2015 at 12:44 AM Post #15 of 23

arnyk

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  So I want to ask you guys since I've been searching and no one had answered this question yet: How long is a lifespan of an audio jack ( not the one attached to the headphone, but the hole where you put your jack in) ?

 
Most headphone jacks both 3.5 mm and 1/4" can be destroyed immediately by abuse. Quality examples of either may live indefinitely if not abused. The 3.5 mm jacks, being smaller and therefore more fragile are more susceptible to abuse.
 

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