Are headphones bad for your hearing .. no matter what?
Feb 3, 2009 at 8:51 AM Post #16 of 32

DefectiveAudioComponent

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Quote:

Originally Posted by cegras /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I've just discovered, after some testing, that sine sweeps ~17 khz up to 12 khz (which around the noise my TV's transformer puts out, damn Samsung) precipitates immediately a tinnitus type ringing that's temporary, and usually disappears by the next morning.

So, what's the verdict? Do I need to see a doctor due to 'hypersensitivity,' or do I simply need to play loud music until I desensitize myself?



I'm experiencing exactly the same thing. Except that I did the sweep too loud a few weeks ago, so the ringing lasted much longer.
 
Feb 3, 2009 at 9:02 AM Post #17 of 32

iGig

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My ears are very sensitive to bright sounds and I can't listen to Grados for very long without feeling fatigue or slight ringing at night. I don't have that problem with other phones or with speakers so now I look for gear that is warm and forgiving with rolled off treble. I'm still trying to find the perfect balance between too dark and too bright, but generally speaking I like warmer sound than the average poster here.

I would try other headphones if I were you but let me warn you that getting off the Grado sound is hard, because nothing sounds as resolving at first. I stopped listening to headphones all together for a few weeks, and then tried a different brand and that worked a little better to get used to the new sound.

Other things that affect my hearing are lack of sleep, caffeine and artificial sweetners; drinking a lot of water, resting and getting some excercise usually helps my ears feel refreshed.
Don't ignore your ears, if they're trying to tell you something listen to them and give them a break.
smile.gif
 
Feb 3, 2009 at 9:12 AM Post #18 of 32

mud

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Haven't noticed tinnitus having relation to using headphones personally. I have tinnitus in my right ear most of the time but it does not bother. It's clear at night when everything is gone silent or when I wear the isolating DT-770 on my head without em playing
biggrin.gif
that is annoying only hear the tinnitus!

But the ground rule really is if something is bothering your mind, just go see a doctor. If there is nothing to worry about he will tell you so and you will feel mentally much better and that's what counts eh?
smily_headphones1.gif
 
Feb 3, 2009 at 10:28 AM Post #20 of 32

Stevesebastianb

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I would say that both headphones and IEM's are bad for your hearing if used for protracted periods of time and at high volume levels.

If in doubt, you should check your hearing by seeing an ENT specialist. Take away the quess work. He could also run a frequency response test for your ears to see what audible frequencies the L and R ears can hear up to.

Bear in mind that your ears will be less sensitive to higher frequencies as you increase in age.

As for ringing in the ears, I too have ringing at night when I am in my bedroom, but that is because it is dead quiet and I am in the country side.
dt880smile.png
 
Feb 3, 2009 at 11:56 AM Post #21 of 32

m0ofassa

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Stevesebastianb /img/forum/go_quote.gif
/snip bedroom, but that is because it is dead quiet and I am in the country side.
dt880smile.png



The most dangerous things are pressure on your ears (from IEMs and bass). Generally sound from fullsized are filtered to the ear and then into the canal, not directly into the canal so the air pressure is much less... 80 db for more than 4 hours is considered "bad" for you, or 100 db for more than 1.5 hours or so... However, it is not certain to cause damage. Most damaging elements are sharp peaks in sound (be it feedback or starting loud during playback).
Not all hearing loss is permenant.
If you experience any pain that is not from just wearing the cans, then change your listening habits.
Would also warn against overcleaning ears, as wax is a natural means of protecting the ear and if you remove a lot you risk damage. Generally your ears will not overproduce wax anyway.
etc.
 
Feb 3, 2009 at 12:31 PM Post #22 of 32

Stevesebastianb

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Quote:

Originally Posted by m0ofassa /img/forum/go_quote.gif
The most dangerous things are pressure on your ears (from IEMs and bass). Generally sound from fullsized are filtered to the ear and then into the canal, not directly into the canal so the air pressure is much less... 80 db for more than 4 hours is considered "bad" for you, or 100 db for more than 1.5 hours or so... However, it is not certain to cause damage. Most damaging elements are sharp peaks in sound (be it feedback or starting loud during playback).
Not all hearing loss is permenant.
If you experience any pain that is not from just wearing the cans, then change your listening habits.
Would also warn against overcleaning ears, as wax is a natural means of protecting the ear and if you remove a lot you risk damage. Generally your ears will not overproduce wax anyway.
etc.



^^^I agree, one should in any case try to limit listening sessions to be under 1 hour for headphones/earphones in any case.

People who have been to noisy rock concerts will have notice that their hearing is affected after they come out of the concert - result of being exposed to high spl levels for a lengthy period.

dbchart.jpg


approximatenoiselevels.jpg
 
Feb 3, 2009 at 9:26 PM Post #23 of 32

Mr Incredible

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One thing that I noticed, is my tinnitus increased after reading threads about it here on head-fi, and every time I do read a thread about it my ears start ringing. I listen to my HFI-780's alot, but I listened to my old HD580's more, and I think my tinnitus increased with the 780's. Of course theres other factors in my life too, when I switched from the HD580's to the HFI-780's then I also started using skill saws alot, sometimes without ear plugs, and I was working in a much noisier environment.
 
Feb 3, 2009 at 10:51 PM Post #24 of 32

cegras

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Quote:

Originally Posted by iGig /img/forum/go_quote.gif
My ears are very sensitive to bright sounds and I can't listen to Grados for very long without feeling fatigue or slight ringing at night. I don't have that problem with other phones or with speakers so now I look for gear that is warm and forgiving with rolled off treble. I'm still trying to find the perfect balance between too dark and too bright, but generally speaking I like warmer sound than the average poster here.

I would try other headphones if I were you but let me warn you that getting off the Grado sound is hard, because nothing sounds as resolving at first. I stopped listening to headphones all together for a few weeks, and then tried a different brand and that worked a little better to get used to the new sound.

Other things that affect my hearing are lack of sleep, caffeine and artificial sweetners; drinking a lot of water, resting and getting some excercise usually helps my ears feel refreshed.
Don't ignore your ears, if they're trying to tell you something listen to them and give them a break.
smile.gif



I'm giving them a long break, I sold off my amp/dac : P.

I don't listen to songs that are particularly 'bright' though. If anything, they've got more emphasis on the lower region .. I like mellow songs in general, not loud, blazing ones.
 
Feb 3, 2009 at 11:20 PM Post #25 of 32

Suntory_Times

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Quote:

Originally Posted by cegras /img/forum/go_quote.gif
I feel that experimenting with EQ would colour the music, so I tend to leave it as is (I know, many flaws ..).

I understand what tintin is saying about peaks though. Maybe I should shop for a phone that is more gentle around the treble.

I want to know, however, if other people have a ringing or have ringing precipitated by headphone listening. Just curious.



I'v ehad no symptoms from headphone listening. Though like anything if you listen to it to loud you will.
 
Feb 3, 2009 at 11:21 PM Post #26 of 32

Usama

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This is why I have Canalphones. I can reduce my volume to less 40% and still enjoy the sound and protect my hearing.
 
Feb 4, 2009 at 5:16 AM Post #27 of 32

abellaw

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I try to be very careful of volume levels when i listen to music especially on headphones...

this is very weird but i swear my hearing improved since i regularly started listening to my SR-80's but i think it is just because i became more aware of sounds around me.

But there are times when the SR-80's dont agree with me and i listen to my porta pros
 
Feb 4, 2009 at 5:29 AM Post #28 of 32

m0ofassa

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Usama /img/forum/go_quote.gif
This is why I have Canalphones. I can reduce my volume to less 40% and still enjoy the sound and protect my hearing.


theyre bad for you
 
Feb 4, 2009 at 6:40 AM Post #29 of 32

nickdawg

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Quote:

Originally Posted by m0ofassa /img/forum/go_quote.gif
headphones arent 'bad' for your hearing. IEMs are. The sound is. Try using the search feature, relatively experienced in the area. Have made detailed posts more than once.


NO, NO, NO, NO, NO, NO, NO, NO, NO, NO. Was that clear enough?

IEMS are NOT bad for your ears. Playing music too loud, through headphones, earbuds or IEMs, that is what is bad for your ears. In fact, IEMs are better for your ears because they block outside noise, thus you turn down the volume because you are not fighting to "drown out" background noise.
 
Feb 4, 2009 at 6:43 AM Post #30 of 32

nickdawg

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Quote:

Originally Posted by m0ofassa /img/forum/go_quote.gif
theyre bad for you


Quote:

This is why I have Canalphones. I can reduce my volume to less 40% and still enjoy the sound and protect my hearing.


No they're not. Listening to music with the volume reduced 40% because you're blocking out background noise. How is that bad for you??
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