Anyone use a smith mchine for working out?
Nov 17, 2008 at 8:08 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 11

Al4x

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Jan 16, 2008
Posts
2,233
Likes
11
ive started getting into it, but the gym at work doesnt have much, and, cause i have to go on my own its getting dangerous

so i was just wondering if its worth getting one, i understand its fairly safe and u can use free weights

also any reccomendations?

im in the uk
 
Nov 17, 2008 at 8:18 PM Post #2 of 11

Kirosia

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Sep 24, 2003
Posts
14,153
Likes
67
Just buy free weights (dumb and bar), an ab-roller, a pullup bar/dip station, a bench, and maybe a squat rack if you planning on lifting hard and big. I've heard negative things about smith machines, and machines in general for that matter. Other than convenience, you're generally better off with free weights.

Here are some workout forums with info:

http://www.rosstraining.com/forum/index.php
Training Discussion - Sherdog Mixed Martial Arts Forums (I don't recommend visiting the non-training sub-forums)
http://bodyweightculture.com/ (primarily bodyweight)

Working out with any normal equipment is safe, as long you know your limits and aren't a complete idiot. (Keep proper form, don't overdo the weight, have a workout plan/strategy) Also, prepare to modify your diet to accommodate the weight training and recovery.
 
Nov 17, 2008 at 8:23 PM Post #3 of 11

Ttvetjanu

1000+ Head-Fier
Joined
May 15, 2005
Posts
1,263
Likes
16
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kirosia /img/forum/go_quote.gif
Just buy free weights (dumb and bar), an ab-roller, a pullup bar/dip station, a bench, and maybe a squat rack if you planning on lifting hard and big.

Working out with any normal equipment is safe, as long you know your limits and aren't a complete idiot. (Keep proper form, don't overdo the weight, have a workout plan/strategy) Also, prepare to modify your diet to accommodate the weight training and recovery.



Totally agreed.

I would personally just go with free weights, I personally hate working with machines. If you use free weights you learn to balance the weights and move them in a more normal way, translating to more realistic gain (and useful strenght).
 
Nov 17, 2008 at 8:31 PM Post #4 of 11

Al4x

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Jan 16, 2008
Posts
2,233
Likes
11
what about the danger of it falling on you?

(btw im begining at this, properly, ive used the multi gyms before but i want to try free weights)

so reccomendations for stuff would be helpfull

DB bars
BB Bar
etc
 
Nov 17, 2008 at 8:36 PM Post #5 of 11

Kirosia

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Sep 24, 2003
Posts
14,153
Likes
67
I'm not really sure specifically, though the rosstraining forum I linked has a great training equipment section. (There's even DIY stuff)

Why would free weights fall on you? If you mean like during a bench press, then you should be using only as much weight as you can handle. (This holds true for any exercise) I've used dumbbells and have never dropped them on myself.

If you're not technically in-shape, consider starting off with just bodyweight exercises. (Movements that use your own body as resistance)
 
Nov 17, 2008 at 8:40 PM Post #7 of 11

Ttvetjanu

1000+ Head-Fier
Joined
May 15, 2005
Posts
1,263
Likes
16
You have to start with low weights, then slowly build confidence. I am by no means a personal trainer, but having spent 3-4 years in gyms I have some experience.

I personally had a bad experience with a multi-tasking machine because they are usually balanced so that both sides are connected, meaning that in theory your right side could be doing most of the work while the left side is just sort of tagging along.

I worked hard for a couple of months only to realise (once i started with free weights) that my body strenght was completely out of proportion. I had to work hard to get back to balance, losing that time that I couldve been spending on overall improvement.

I personally have some old dumbells and a bench for benchpressing + some weights + the bar, can't really remember what brand. When buying them just make sure that the weights stay on the bars/dumbells.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Al4x /img/forum/go_quote.gif
yeah i was thinking particularly of the chest press and i was under the impression u should push a muscle group to failure to seriously improve


That is only for more extreme traning. Getting a training buddy sure would help though (allthough the difference is not significant). Start your tranining lightly, I strongly recommend basic pushups (I'm currently on the 100 pushups programme http://hundredpushups.com/about.html )
 
Nov 17, 2008 at 8:44 PM Post #8 of 11

Kirosia

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Sep 24, 2003
Posts
14,153
Likes
67
Quote:

u should push a muscle group to failure to seriously improve


Actually, that's not necessarily true. Depending on who you ask, some say it's better to fall a few reps short of failure. There's less chance of injury and quicker chance of recovery. (Meaning you can workout longer/harder/more often) Try whatever works for you, and switch up if you plateau.

I have a couple great workout PDFs if you want them.
 
Nov 17, 2008 at 9:17 PM Post #10 of 11

jonathanjong

Headphoneus Supremus
Joined
Aug 4, 2008
Posts
4,041
Likes
12
I like the machines at the gym, but find myself using free weights more. If you have to get your own, however, I'd def. go for free weights. Dumb bells would be safer than barbells, I guess, if you're thinking of presses and such.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top