Any artists in the house?
Mar 1, 2006 at 11:25 PM Thread Starter Post #1 of 6

Kassem

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I work at a comic shop, and i've always WANTED to draw. Sitting here.... bored as could be... looking at all the "how to draw" books.. well it gets me into money trouble but... disreguarding all that,

What and where do you buy your equipment? Right now I probably just need a couple of good pads and pencils along with some sort of pen for random inking. If the hobby gets anymore serious i'd like to also get an entry-level eisel (SP? - hell i dont even know if thats the right word).

Any advice or if i missed anything, LMK!


Thanks all,

Jeremy
 
Mar 2, 2006 at 1:13 AM Post #2 of 6

sagocup

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My high school specializes in the arts and the performing arts. So the teachers give us places to shop and what to buy. :p
Well I shop at the Blick store (formally thr Art Store) b/c it's so more organized and has a better atmosphere than Pearl. I have brought a range of bristol paper(a must for illustration), the sakura micron pens(for architecture and illustration), prisma colored pencils(illustration or whatever), store brand paint I guess for watercolor and oil painting. I don't remember what the brand name of my brushes.
-Oh thank God this year I don't need to shop for art supplies since I took sculpture class and that's already all paid for in the fee)

http://www.pearlpaint.com/

http://www.dickblick.com/

You can get a discount w/your Student ID, I'm not sure if that also applies online.
 
Mar 2, 2006 at 1:37 AM Post #3 of 6

RnB180

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take life drawing and study human muscle anatomy.
Then take some drawing classes dealing with lighting like rendering.
Rendering will also help you learn how to draw cars and vehicles.

life drawing will help you get a grasp of the human anatomy and how muscles are placed, you also need a very good idea of light and shadow relations and from there you can start exagerating correct proportions via comic heroes.

Then learn persective drawing so you can understand how to draw backgrounds and take a beginning drawing class for some still art practice, and learn to draw shrubbery and plants.

You can also get one of those small mechanical body dolls, to help you compose positions and angles that are difficult to draw.
 
Mar 2, 2006 at 1:41 AM Post #4 of 6

anyatinagan

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I've never been formally trained so I'm not familiar with the specialty shops around here. I've heard of some of them I just dont know where to find them heh I get lost easily. I just buy my supplies at a local bookstore here (yeah they carry art materials). When I first started with pencils, I drew on watercolor paper. It's a waste of specialized paper but it's a really flexible material.

I'm just all for gelpens right now because it's cheap and it looks great for grungy doodles.

BTW it doesn't hurt to go digital. There's a really good free illustration program out there called Inkscape, if you dont want to bother with the mess of traditional drawings, though it's not gonna be as fun or as satisfying if you were to draw with your hands. It's very good for line art IMO, which is the staple of comic book style drawings if I'm not mistaken hehe.

www.deviantart.com - is a great source of inspiration
 
Mar 2, 2006 at 1:59 AM Post #5 of 6

RnB180

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when drawing, illustration, make sure to get cold press paper, they have tooth to the surface which makes it beneficial for graphite sketching.
 
Mar 2, 2006 at 2:09 AM Post #6 of 6

Edwood

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If you want to draw comic books, learn to draw not from comic books, but from other sources. Take a few art classes, like life drawing, figure drawing, etc. Also, learn about perspective, 2 point, 3 point perspective, which will get you started in learning to draw architectural scenery.

As for tools, I no longer draw on paper, or use pencils or ink.

This is what I use now:

21UX_01.jpg


-Ed
 

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