AHHH Tinnutitis!
Apr 9, 2002 at 2:56 AM Thread Starter Post #1 of 28

andrzejpw

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Gah, I know its not spelled right, but I'm a little scared. Occasionally, I will notice a ringing. Its very rare. Maybe once or twice a week. I keep my listening volumes low. Is the ringing normal? I didn't notice it before I got hd580s.
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Apr 9, 2002 at 3:10 AM Post #2 of 28
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No, it isn't normal.

Quote:

Tinnitus
\ tin-night’-is or tin’-it-is (either pronunciation is correct)\ n. [L., tinnire to ring]: the perception of ringing, hissing, or other sound in the ears or head when no external sound is present. For some people, tinnitus is just a nuisance. For others, it is a life-altering condition. In the United States, an estimated 12 million people have tinnitus to a distressing degree.


For the full FAQ go here : Tinnitus FAQ

Here's something that needs to be posted :

What causes tinnitus?

The exact physiological cause or causes of tinnitus are not known. There are, however, several likely sources, all of which are known to trigger or worsen tinnitus.

Noise-induced hearing loss – Exposure to loud noises can damage and even destroy hair cells, called cilia, in the inner ear. Once damaged, these hair cells cannot be renewed or replaced. Millions of Americans have hearing loss due to noise exposure, and up to 90 percent of all tinnitus patients have some level of noise-induced hearing loss.

Wax build-up in the ear canal – The amount of wax ears produce varies by individual. Sometimes, people produce enough wax that their hearing can be compromised or their tinnitus can seem louder. If you produce a lot of earwax, speak to your physician about having excess wax removed manually—not with a cotton swab, but by an otolaryngologist (also called an Ear, nose, and throat doctor).

Certain medications – Some medications are ototoxic—that is, the medications are toxic to the ear. Other medications will produce tinnitus as a side effect without damaging the inner ear. Effects, which can depend on the dosage of the medication, can be temporary or permanent. Before taking any medication, make sure that your prescribing physician is aware of your tinnitus, and discuss alternative medications that may be available.

Ear or sinus infections – Many people, including children, experience tinnitus along with an ear or sinus infection. Generally, the tinnitus will lessen and gradually go away once the infection is healed.

Jaw misalignment – Some people have misaligned jaw joints or jaw muscles, which can not only induce tinnitus, but also affect cranial muscles and nerves and shock absorbers in the jaw joint. Many dentists specialize in this jaw misalignment and can provide assistance with treatment.

Cardiovascular disease – Approximately 3 percent of tinnitus patients experience pulsatile tinnitus; people with pulsatile tinnitus typically hear a rhythmic pulsing, often in time with a heartbeat. Pulsatile tinnitus can indicate the presence of a vascular condition—where the blood flow through veins and arteries is compromised—like a heart murmur, hypertension, or hardening of the arteries.

Certain types of tumors – Very rarely, people have a benign and slow-growing tumor on their auditory, vestibular, or facial nerves. These tumors can cause tinnitus, deafness, facial paralysis, and loss of balance.

Head and neck trauma – Physical trauma to the head and neck can induce tinnitus. Other symptoms include headaches, vertigo, and memory loss.


Is there anything I can do to protect myself from tinnitus?

The Occupational Safety & Health Act (OSHA) suggests that noises above 90 decibels over the course of an eight-hour workday should be avoided. And for some people, 90 decibels is still too loud. The next time you are around a noise that bothers your ears—either in the workplace or at a sporting or recreational event—wear earplugs. And be aware of other activities or situations that include loud noises, like hair drying or lawn-mowing. Make it easy for yourself to protect your ears by hanging earmuffs over the lawn mower handle, or keeping ear plugs in the bathroom next to your hair dryer. Repeated exposure to loud noises can have a cumulative effect on your hearing.


Can anything make tinnitus worse?

Exposure to loud noises, as mentioned above, can have a negative effect on your hearing and exacerbate tinnitus. Be sure to protect yourself with earplugs, earmuffs, or by simply not taking part in noisy events.

Some medications can make tinnitus worse. Tell your physicians—not just your ear, nose, and throat doctor—about all prescription and over the counter medications you are currently taking or have recently taken.

Many people find that alcohol, nicotine, and caffeine can worsen their tinnitus, as can eating certain foods. Nicotine, for example, affects the vascular system by narrowing blood vessels that carry important oxygen to your ears, thereby increasing the level of tinnitus. Some people find that foods with a high-sugar content or any amount of quinine (tonic water) make their tinnitus seem louder. Monitor how you respond to different stimuli, and find a healthy balance where you do not eliminate all the foods that you love, but also where you do not unnecessarily exacerbate your tinnitus.

Finally, stress and fatigue can affect your tinnitus. Make time to relax, and understand that life events can manifest themselves in your body in the form of increased tinnitus.

http://www.ata.org
 
Apr 9, 2002 at 3:20 AM Post #3 of 28
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so how does headphones fit into all of this?

keep reading :

Protect Your Ears


Know which noises can cause damage. Wear ear plugs when you are involved in a loud activity.


110 Decibels
Regular exposure of more than 1 minute risks permanent hearing loss.


100 Decibels
No more than 15 minutes unprotected exposure recommended.


90 Decibels
Prolonged exposure to any noise above 90 decibels can cause gradual hearing loss.

howloud.gif



What sounds cause NIHL?

NIHL can be caused by a one-time exposure to loud sound as well as by repeated exposure to sounds at various loudness levels over an extended period of time. The loudness of sound is measured in units called decibels. For example, usual conversation is approximately 60 decibels, the humming of a refrigerator is 40 decibels and city traffic noise can be 80 decibels. Examples of sources of loud noises that cause NIHL are motorcycles, firecrackers and small arms fire, all emitting sounds from 120 decibels to 140 decibels. Sounds of less than 75 decibels, even after long exposure, are unlikely to cause hearing loss.

Exposure to harmful sounds causes damage to the sensitive hair cells of the inner ear and to the nerve of hearing. These structures can be injured by noise in two different ways: from an intense brief impulse, such as an explosion, or from continuous exposure to noise, such as that in a woodworking shop.


What are the effects of NIHL?

The effect from impulse sound can be instantaneous and can result in an immediate hearing loss that may be permanent. The structures of the inner ear may be severely damaged. This kind of hearing loss may be accompanied by tinnitus, an experience of sound like ringing, buzzing or roaring in the ears or head, which may subside over time. Hearing loss and tinnitus may be experienced in one or both ears, and tinnitus may continue constantly or intermittently throughout a lifetime.

The damage that occurs slowly over years of continuous exposure to loud noise is accompanied by various changes in the structure of the hair cells. It also results in hearing loss and tinnitus. Exposure to impulse and continuous noise may cause only a temporary hearing loss. If the hearing recovers, the temporary hearing loss is called a temporary threshold shift. The temporary threshold shift largely disappears within 16 hours after exposure to loud noise.

Both forms of NIHL can be prevented by the regular use of hearing protectors such as ear plugs or ear muffs.


What are the symptoms of NIHL?

The symptoms of NIHL that occur over a period of continuous exposure increase gradually. Sounds may become distorted or muffled, and it may be difficult for the person to understand speech. The individual may not be aware of the loss, but it can be detected with a hearing test.


Who is affected by NIHL?

More than 30 million Americans are exposed to hazardous sound levels on a regular basis. Individuals of all ages including children, adolescents, young adults and older people can develop NIHL. Exposure occurs in the work place, in recreational settings and at home. There is an increasing awareness of the harmful noises in recreational activities, for example, target shooting or hunting, snowmobiles, go-carts, woodworking and other hobby equipment, power horns, cap guns and model airplanes. Harmful noises at home may come from vacuum cleaners, garbage disposals, lawn mowers, leaf blowers and shop tools. People who live in either urban or rural settings may be exposed to noisy devices on a daily basis. Of the 28 million Americans who have some degree of hearing loss, about one-third have been affected, at least in part, by noise.




check out this website for more infomation

http://www.nidcd.nih.gov
 
Apr 9, 2002 at 3:22 AM Post #4 of 28

gloco

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"Cardiovascular disease – Approximately 3 percent of tinnitus patients experience pulsatile tinnitus; people with pulsatile tinnitus typically hear a rhythmic pulsing, often in time with a heartbeat. Pulsatile tinnitus can indicate the presence of a vascular condition—where the blood flow through veins and arteries is compromised—like a heart murmur, hypertension, or hardening of the arteries. "

This makes me a bit nervous, because from time to time i do have some pulsating beats in one of my ears, usually my left since i know its messed up, and i come from a family that suffers from hypertension. Plus, it doesn't help that a doctor i visited two years back found that i have a heart murmur. I think its time for a change of diet and to relax off the cans for a while.

frown.gif
 
Apr 9, 2002 at 3:27 AM Post #5 of 28
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I really don't think that headphones are a problem unless you are really cracking it up.

There are so many other factors to think about. Also cracking up your TV and Speakers can damage your hearing just as much or more so than headphones.
 
Apr 9, 2002 at 3:31 AM Post #6 of 28

eric343

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gloco: If you're like me, the trick is to stay off caffiene and sleep well. Staying up late and/or taking caffiene triggers PVCs in my heart. (no, not plumbing!) I found this out when I got an EKG (I was helping my mom set up her new EKG machine; both my parents are doctors) after staying up late the previous night.

Also, I do have occasional tinnitus, although it's mostly unrelated to headphone listening. Apart from those 3 hour auditioning sessions though... (I turn up the volume a bit to hear details better when auditioning)
 
Apr 9, 2002 at 3:57 AM Post #8 of 28

gloco

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Quote:

Originally posted by eric343
gloco: If you're like me, the trick is to stay off caffiene and sleep well. Staying up late and/or taking caffiene triggers PVCs in my heart. (no, not plumbing!) I found this out when I got an EKG (I was helping my mom set up her new EKG machine; both my parents are doctors) after staying up late the previous night.

Also, I do have occasional tinnitus, although it's mostly unrelated to headphone listening. Apart from those 3 hour auditioning sessions though... (I turn up the volume a bit to hear details better when auditioning)


Ahhh, shoot, does this mean i should stop drinking Coke and stop staying up till 3am? Damn....
biggrin.gif


I do get a good 8 hrs of sleep, but sometimes i feel a little groggy in the morning, snoring only leads to other problems, like sleep apnea.

Also, i wonder if how wax buildup may play a role in this?

KR,

I never use speakers with my stereo, and no, i really dont crank the cans at all. I keep 'em at modest levels. I do drink a lot of caffeine laced Soda though
frown.gif


Although, thanks for your extremely helpful posts. I'm sure some folks here will find them useful.
 
Apr 9, 2002 at 4:06 AM Post #9 of 28

Blighty

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If the ringing is only temporary and stops immediately, you have nothing to worry about. Changes in blood pressure and heart rate can often trigger such a sensation for a brief period of time lasting from 5-30 seconds if I recall correctly.
 
Apr 9, 2002 at 4:11 AM Post #10 of 28

gloco

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I rarely have ringing and it does tend to last a few seconds when it occurs, same goes for the rhythmic pulsing, kinda like a bass drum being hit rapdily, then it stops. Not painful or anything, just a weird sensation.
 
Apr 9, 2002 at 10:19 AM Post #11 of 28

andrzejpw

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Quote:

Originally posted by Blighty
If the ringing is only temporary and stops immediately, you have nothing to worry about. Changes in blood pressure and heart rate can often trigger such a sensation for a brief period of time lasting from 5-30 seconds if I recall correctly.



THANK GOD.

I listen to headphones @ about 70dB.

It only lasts for a second or 2.. .

and the last time it happened was over a week ago! Any help?
 
Apr 9, 2002 at 11:08 AM Post #12 of 28

setmenu

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andrzejpw
Sorry to read of your tinnitus distress, I expect it is just the normal ocasional events experienced my most people.
I suffer mild tinnitus in one ear ,so I am hyper aware of volume
and restrict volumes accordingly.
Just keep aware.
Anyhow with 70db listening you should be pretty safe!
70db seems pretty low, are you sure it is 70db?
volume can be deceptive.

I also agree regarding the excellent Idea of having a tinnitus/hearing educational thread at the headers of these forums.....safety first.
As stated in many articles hearing damage in the young is on the
up.
Anything audio forums can do to help stem the tide has got to
be positive.


setmenu
 
Apr 9, 2002 at 6:13 PM Post #13 of 28

ai0tron

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I have tinnitus in both ears. When I had the flu recently it got worse for some reason, maybe it was the Nyquil. I have always listened at low volumes but loud events keep pounding my ears. Especially the club, to which I always wear earplugs now, which believe it or not makes it easier to hear people. I noticeably increased the tinnitus in my right ear when for some reason my bike tire started swelling up and I thought I would drain it real quick and as I reached down to unscrew the cap on the tire the thing blew up and the pressure wave went into my ear. It still rings just a little more than my left ear.

Oh well, I have also had tinnitus since I was about 3 years old. I don't know why but it's been there for a long time so I am pretty used to it. Still, it's very annoying.

neeee
 
Apr 9, 2002 at 8:58 PM Post #14 of 28

Flasken

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I always have an extremely high frequency sound in my ears which is so silent that i can only hear it when focusing on it.

Have you noticed how your mind amplifies sounds when you focus on them?

My bedlamps adaptor makes a very silent humm. A couple of days ago i was reading a long book and after an hour or so the lamp adaptor-humm just got louder and louder untill i couldn´t stand it anymore.. Then i went down in the kitchen and drank some water - when i came back i could not hear the sound .

Another example could be late night essay writing on the computer. After a while the fan just seems to get louder and louder, untill you shake it off and focus on something else..


I think these short periods of tinnitus could also have something to do with your mind amplifying a slight increase in the ear-humming, because you focus on it.

... - does anyone follow me on this one??
 
Apr 10, 2002 at 1:35 AM Post #15 of 28

The Quality Guru

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I completely can relate with you, Flasken. I was actually just about to post something about the very high frequency hum in my ears, which, I think I have had all my life. Also, I have chronic headaches and migraines, with which ringing in my ears only worsens. I don't believe, Flasken, that the very high pitched hum in our ears is abnormal; it's just a result of increased focus upon very miniscule and petty things, that when focus is deiverted from them, they go away.
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