TinAudio T2

General Information

Tin Audio T2 2 Dynamic Driver HiFi MMCX In-ear Earphone

Description

  • Electronic frequency division
  • Alloy wire drawing process
  • Sound pure, without any unpleasant hissing
  • Good sense of balance, the sound is never too bright or too dark, treble ,mids ,bass power are balanced distribution, the convergence between frequency is natural and smooth .
  • High frequency extension is good, delicate and supple
  • Low frequency dive deep, clean and full, full of flexibility and strength, without any fat, slow feeling
  • Medium frequency distortion is very small, transparent and warm, vocal is vivid and natural, there is thickness, magnetic, not exaggerated and nasal
  • Good resolution, rich details, small signal can be clearly reproduced
  • Have good sound field characterization ability, sound field is open, the instrument positioning is accurate and stable. Sound field has enough information
  • Dynamic is not obvious compression, with a good sense of speed, large volume without distortion or distortion is very small.
Specification

  • Brand: Tin Audio
  • Model: T2
  • Driver: dynamic 10mm woofer + 6mm tweeter
  • Impedance: 16Ω
  • Frequency response range: 12-40000Hz
  • Earphone interface:MMCX
  • Plug: 3.5mm Carbon fiber gold-plated straight plug,
  • Cable: 1.2M 5N oxygen free copper silver-plated wire
Package


  • Tin Audio T2
  • 3 pairs of silicone eartips
  • 1 pair of foam eartip

Latest reviews

Shenzai

New Head-Fier
Tin T2: Still Good In 2022?
Pros: Neutral sound for sub $50
Nice stock cable
Metal shell
Non-intrusive fit
Cons: Stock tips are mediocre
Blunted and boring sound
Video review here:

Disclaimer: This iem is my personal unit, I have not been paid to say anything good or bad about them. I will review them to the best of my abilities, and all thoughts and opinions are my own. Also, the cable that I used in the review was not the stock one.

Back when I first got into the audiophile hobby, the first iem that I bought was the Tin Audio T2 (back when Tin Hifi was called Tin Audio). I daily drove it for the good part of a year before giving it away, and now I have another one for review. Let's see how good the Tin T2 still is in 2022.

Drivability: The Tin T2 is your average iem in this regard, which means that you should be able to drive it off your phone or a dongle. No desktop amps or beefy daps required.

Accessories: The T2 I got came with the older accessories. It seems newer T2 iems come with a cable that has grey mmcx connectors instead of clear ones, and it has preformed earhooks instead of the straight cable that I got. Aside from that, the cable material doesn't seem to be different. The tips that my T2 came with are alright, they're your typical cheap silicone tips, which means they'll do the job but aren't great.

Build: The Tin T2 has a very solid metal shell, which is great for durability since it won't crack or break like resin shells might. I can attest to how tough the T2 is, the pair that I daily drove before giving it away was handled roughly for over a year, and didn't show any obvious wear and tear. Very nice. However, my main gripe with the build of the Tin T2 iems has been the mmcx connectors on the iem. For some reason, these mmcx connectors are always tight and I often find it a little difficult to disconnect the cable when i want to cable swap. Maybe it's just me, but from how many people I saw having trouble back in the day, maybe not. Just a good thing to note down.

Fit: The T2 fits very nicely in my ear, as their shape and design allows them to be easily worn straight down and over the ear. The nozzle makes it so the you only need a shallow fit for a good seal, which is nice for those who don't like intrusive fits. I think most people won't have trouble wearing this iem.

Sound:

Bass: Bass on the T2 is mediocre at best. There's roll-off in the subbass, so tracks that really like subbass such as "Why So Serious?" from The Dark Knight soundtrack sound pretty flat and not immersive. Luckily, there's enough tightness and amount of midbass so "Faith" by the Weeknd and fast-paced songs like Darren Styles' "Us Against The World" sounds alright, but still not that great. The T2's bass isn't the cleanest nor is it well textured.

Mids: The T2's midrange is alright. Neither male nor female vocals shined, which means to say they were both fine, but didn't excel. Instruments sound adequate and didn't sound too out of place in the mix. There is decent texture for the price.

Treble: There isn't the best treble extension on the T2, which is to be expected in the ~$50 price range. The treble that is there is fairly non-fatiguing and not that peaky. I hear sibilance sometimes, depending on the song.

Technicalities: The T2 actually has pretty decent detail retrieval for the price. Everything else is mediocre though. Soundstage is typical for iems, which means it's in your head. Imaging is left, right and center. Layering and separation are alright. My main gripe is that things just sound blunted and dull on the T2.Vocals, instruments like drums, violins, everything is so bland and boring. Every song I listen to is alright, but I'd end up thinking "I'm bored, I want to listen to something else". Nothing is worse to me than having a transducer sound boring.

Final Thoughts: The T2 is an iem that is significant to me because it's what got me started in this hobby. However, listening to it again for this review reminded me of why I didn't just stop there. It is such a boring iem, that I don't like it and can't recommend unless you want something that's not a v-shaped iem at under $50. Even then, I'm sure there's an iem that isn't as bland as the T2.

gib wav

New Head-Fier
Tin Hi-Fi T2 Review- The Budget Outstander
Pros: Strong midrange representation
Good height and depth in soundstage
excellent tonality
Comfortable
Cons: Bass range rolls off quite early
Fatiguing treble
Lack of good seperation
Constantly checking to see if they are still in my ears by pushing them in
Introduction
It is easy to say that the Tin Hi-Fi T2 is the IEM that made the company more recognisable and chosen as a choice to a load of people who are looking for a budget pair of IEM’s due to the sound they produce for the price point, costing £45.99, and with potential sales, making them even cheaper.

To understand better. An IEM is an in-ear monitor. It sits further into your ear canal than normal earphones. It is what you see when singers are on stage, or when they are making music. Their primary goal is to be focused more on sound quality than convenience.

Sound
The T2s are tuned to deliver “neutral” or “flat” sound signature. Therefore, they deliver a pleasurable and relaxing listening experience, which can be greatly appreciated at times.

With the T2s, if you are wanting powerful bass from these IEM’s, change your expectations immediately. This is not to say there isn’t bass, it just isn’t in your face. The T2s do however have a really good punch, but it does roll off quite early. Listening to Britney Stoney’s "O.D", the bass is just so punchy, whilst still giving off that very relaxed tempo. This results in an enjoyable listening experience. The T2s bass can still attack when it needs to. “Wolves” by Kanye West really shows how aggressive the bass can be, it really is the cherry on top in harmony with the hums or the “Oooo we ooo wee oooo’s”.

The mids, or where most of the magic happens, are well represented on the T2s. The strums of the acoustic guitar on Oasis’s “Half the World Away” was really brought to life. In addition, the vocals were so nicely profound, without shadowing both of the guitars, and may I also mention that both of the guitars were not in a competition to see which one stood out better, they were both in cooperation, raising that bar of depth.

The T2s treble representation can be too bright at times, even becoming too fatiguing for me during longer listening sessions. In fact, due to how piercing Sia’s vocals are in “Chandelier (piano version)”, I am having to turn down the volume, which can sometimes be a problem for me because at lower volumes, in busier songs, it makes the vocals sound really pushed back. However, I do have to say, there is really good treble detail, for sub £100. Phil Collins “I Cannot Believe it’s True”, makes the cowbells sparkle and give the Hi-hat’s excellent tonality.

I am also impressed with the soundstage on the T2s. There is a very good amount of depth. Listening to Norman Greenbaum’s “Spirit In The Sky”, the fuzzy faint guitar is not so direct and is nicely distant, whilst the drums are more direct. This is also the same for the harmonious vocals, they are also distant, it really ties up and adds a whole level of depth, I never would have expected a pair of IEM’s to have at this price.

In busier songs, the T2s can struggle to execute really good separation. With all the instruments being used in Daniel Powter’s “Bad Day”, it seems to start to lose its control. The drums get lost with the piano, and I struggle to hear what parts of the drums are being hit in the chorus. This also takes a toll on the vocals, as aforementioned, his vocals are getting pushed back. In songs that are less busier, there is better separation and vocals stand out more, for example, Everything but the girl’s “Downtown Train”. The piano has clear separation from the vocals, and it sounds a lot more spacious. What needs to be taken into account is, not all of the time, less busy songs are going to be played.

Overall, the T2s sound is really enjoyable, but for me, they are a lot better in less busy songs, but in these songs, they shine ridiculously well. It might take a while for people to really appreciate the sound quality of these IEM’s but when they do, I believe they will be amazed at how capable they are for the price point.

Fit and Comfort
For me, I have struggled with the fit. I keep on thinking that they are not in properly because they don’t create a proper seal in my ears. Subsequently, I keep on pushing them in, even though they are far as they can go. I have tried different tips, but the only tips that do fit are the smallest ones. They, however, do come with a good assortment of different sized tips, including a set of blue foam tips.

When I am heavily distracted by the music and don’t push them in most of the time, the T2s are a comfortable pair of IEM’s, I have been able to sit through long sessions without needing to take them out. You do have the option to either wear them with the cable hanging down or up and over the ear. I found them to be better secured with the cable over the ear.

Build Quality
Tanks. They are built like Tanks. They have exceptionally good build quality. They are metal, all the way through, and are machined really well that is conducive to a very nice simplistic aesthetic. They don’t really stand out, they are very subtle. I can’t really see the T2s breaking or taking damage easily, the only possible damage would be cosmetic, and that would be potential scratches from the contact of each IEM.

Tits and Tats
The T2s include, I want to say a carrying case, that is relatively large, and a detachable MMCX connector cable, that is nicely braided and relatively long. I don’t hear any cable rub which is a nice addition, and there is a plastic ring on the cable that can make the length of the cable split longer, which is useful.

Conclusion
The T2s are an excellent choice and should be considered for people that want to make an entry into the IEM world. They are a very capable performer and have a sound signature that really isn't found in many earphones let alone IEM’s at this price point, but people shouldn’t consider this the last IEM pair they need to buy, as it contains issues such as how challenging it is to make a better separation in busier tracks, but they are still a pair of IEM’s that should be considered hugely.

iceperry

New Head-Fier
Pros: Instruments shine, Neutral tuning well done, Nice soundstage and details, Build Quality of earbuds
Cons: Comfort, Not the best for vocals, Poorer than average isolation, Subpar cable, Potential Mismatch of Expectations
View more reviews at: https://www.perrivanaudio.com/

Overall Rating: 7.5/10

Intro

Disclaimer: I purchased the Tin T2 from Aliexpress at full price and this review is written of my own accord.

This is a review of the Tin T2, the first breakout success of company TinHiFi. This set has received rave reviews from around the world saying how it sounds many times more than its asking price and today we shall have a look at this set.

20200530_161552.jpg


Packaging and Accessories (Score: 6/10)

A very simple yet minimalistic packaging, no complaints in this area, not at this price range at least. Decent tip selection provided, with the famous blue foams to complete the look. The blue foams provided are of good quality and have good synergy with the sound of the Tin T2.

It comes with an honestly subpar MMCX cable. My cable broke after a month, so it is not pictured but overall the MMCX connectors did not seem to be well made and the 3.5mm plug on my cable had a gold coloured metal that faded in 2 weeks.

20200530_160435.jpg


Build Quality and Fit (Score: 7/10)

I really should split this section into 2 for this earpiece. The build quality was excellent as the T2 earphones themselves are built like tanks and I don’t think they would be taking any damage soon, and the only thing I could see happening to them are some scratches from the earbuds scratching each other. They look beautifully machined and I love the aesthetic.

However, the fit for this earphone is highly subjective. To me, they are not the most comfortable. They also have very wide bores and only very few tips fit comfortably for me. Another thing to take note is that the T2s were designed to be worn cable down (as can be told from the red-blue colourings at the female MMCX connectors) However, they wouldn’t stay in my ears if I wore them that way and the only solution was to switch them around and wear the cable over the ears.

Sound (Overall Score: 7.5/10)

T2.jpg

Frequency response of the Tin T2 courtesy of Crinacle

Sources Used
  • Shanling M3s
  • Fiio Q1 MkII (I liked this pairing as the T2 benefitted from the warmth of the Q1 and I enjoyed having the option to use the bass boost switch on the Q1)
Albums and Tracks Listened to
  • Aladdin Original Broadway Recording
  • Martin Frost – Clarinet Concerto in A Major, K.622
  • The Killers – Battle Born
  • Andy Gibb - The Very Best Of
  • Spinners – Essentials
  • The Temptations – Classic Soul Hits
  • Postmodern Jukebox – The New Classics (Recorded Live!)
Bass (Score: 6.5/10)

Do not expect powerful bass from this set. This is one big area where the sound differs from many chi-fi earphones. There is a decent punch in the mid-bass however as can be seen from the frequency graph, there is a significant dip (roll-off) in the sub-bass. To describe how this feels, it constantly feels as though the T2s do not have a good seal in my ear and I keep trying to push them further in although they are already secure. My guess would be because of the way the T2 is heavily vented. (Isolation suffers because of this and I wouldn’t recommend this for a noisy train commute.) One thing I like about the bass is its speed and attack. It sounds tight and doesn’t bleed or linger too long, and decays naturally. This really shone in the tap-dancing section of Aladdin’s “Friend Like Me”.

Mids (Score: 7.5/10)

The mids perform well on the T2s. It’s not what you’d usually expect from a typical V-shaped tuning with scooped mids. Listening to Martin Frost’s rendition of the “Clarinet Concerto in A” by Mozart was a real treat. It really brought the strings to life. Few IEMs in the sub-100 range succeed in really injecting energy into the strings without going overboard. Most of the time I find that they either sound lifeless or shrill. However, the T2 seems to hit the sweet spot, with very nice detail retrieval as well. To add the cherry on the cake, the tonality of the clarinet was very enjoyable too. The clarinet sounded mellow, yet with lots of breadth and not suppressed by the other instruments. The soundstage on the T2 is also much better than average, giving a very enjoyable experience with classical music. The biggest complaint I have is with how vocals somehow seem weak and too far back in the mix.

Treble (Score: 7/10)

Treble here is a little too boosted for my liking, especially for longer listening sessions. There are peaks at the 7-8k and 10-12k region and it makes it a little fatiguing and I find myself having to refrain from turning the volume too high. This is a big con as I constantly find that the vocals are too laid back in the mix and I keep wanting to turn up the volume to hear them better. However, a good thing is that the treble has impressive detail retrieval for such a budget set. Listening to Aladdin’s “Friend Like Me”, the bar chimes have a very nice shimmer and sparkle. The Hi-hats have an excellent tonality on the T2 as well. Quick note, if you are treble sensitive, swapping our silicone tips for foam tips may help.

Overall

The Tin T2 leans towards a brighter sound signature. It has a more detail-oriented tuning. Although I wouldn’t call these lacking in bass, people who are more used to more common V-shape tunings with slightly elevated bass might find this set hard to adjust to. I won’t lie, it took me a while of listening before I managed to fully appreciate the strengths of the T2. It is quite a technically capable set, especially for its asking price.

Comparison

Tin T2 vs TinT4 (Review here)
20200605_132715.jpg


I am going to be skipping the Tin T3s here and jumping straight to the T4s. The T4s have been touted as the upgrade to the Tin T2 and for good reason. The T4, with a similar shell design and with an upgraded cable and packaging, has a better bass and sub-bass response. Its overall sound signature that leans more towards a V-shape. The T4 also has a smaller soundstage than the T2. The T4s are also much more technically capable and those who found themselves wishing more detail from the T2 would enjoy the T4.

However, the T2 has been hyped so hard for its unbeatable value but I cannot say the same for the T4. The T4 is significantly pricier than the T2s and although the T4s is a worthy performer, I would not say that it is as solid a rec as the T2s for what it offers.

Conclusion

The sub $50 range is flooded with so many models that people wanting to jump into the hobby would have a hard time finding something to get. Among the sea of normies, the Tin T2 stands out as an outstanding performer and pushes out a special sound signature with quality which is rarely seen in budget models. This is not to say that the Tin T2 is “endgame”, with things like me wishing the bass didn’t roll off so early (which would be a huge improvement IMHO). The Tin T2 fully deserves its status of a sub $50 budget rec.

Review written by: Perry

Comments

gib wav

New Head-Fier
Introduction


It is easy to say that the Tin Hi-Fi T2 is the IEM that made the company more recognisable and chosen as a choice to a load of people who are looking for a budget pair of IEM’s due to the sound they produce for the price point, costing £45.99, and with potential sales, making them even cheaper.

To understand better. An IEM is an in-ear monitor. It sits further into your ear canal than normal earphones. It is what you see when singers are on stage, or when they are making music. Their primary goal is to be focused more on sound quality than convenience.


Sound
The T2s are tuned to deliver “neutral” or “flat” sound signature. Therefore, they deliver a pleasurable and relaxing listening experience, which can be greatly appreciated at times.

With the T2s, if you are wanting powerful bass from these IEM’s, change your expectations immediately. This is not to say there isn’t bass, it just isn’t in your face. The T2s do however have a really good punch, but it does roll off quite early. Listening to Britney Stoney’s "O.D", the bass is just so punchy, whilst still giving off that very relaxed tempo. This results in an enjoyable listening experience. The T2s bass can still attack when it needs to. “Wolves” by Kanye West really shows how aggressive the bass can be, it really is the cherry on top in harmony with the hums or the “Oooo we ooo wee oooo’s”.

The mids, or where most of the magic happens, are well represented on the T2s. The strums of the acoustic guitar on Oasis’s “Half the World Away” was really brought to life. In addition, the vocals were so nicely profound, without shadowing both of the guitars, and may I also mention that both of the guitars were not in a competition to see which one stood out better, they were both in cooperation, raising that bar of depth.

The T2s treble representation can be too bright at times, even becoming too fatiguing for me during longer listening sessions. In fact, due to how piercing Sia’s vocals are in “Chandelier (piano version)”, I am having to turn down the volume, which can sometimes be a problem for me because at lower volumes, in busier songs, it makes the vocals sound really pushed back. However, I do have to say, there is really good treble detail, for sub £100. Phil Collins “I Cannot Believe it’s True”, makes the cowbells sparkle and give the Hi-hat’s excellent tonality.

I am also impressed with the soundstage on the T2s. There is a very good amount of depth. Listening to Norman Greenbaum’s “Spirit In The Sky”, the fuzzy faint guitar is not so direct and is nicely distant, whilst the drums are more direct. This is also the same for the harmonious vocals, they are also distant, it really ties up and adds a whole level of depth, I never would have expected a pair of IEM’s to have at this price.

In busier songs, the T2s can struggle to execute really good separation. With all the instruments being used in Daniel Powter’s “Bad Day”, it seems to start to lose its control. The drums get lost with the piano, and I struggle to hear what parts of the drums are being hit in the chorus. This also takes a toll on the vocals, as aforementioned, his vocals are getting pushed back. In songs that are less busier, there is better separation and vocals stand out more, for example, Everything but the girl’s “Downtown Train”. The piano has clear separation from the vocals, and it sounds a lot more spacious. What needs to be taken into account is, not all of the time, less busy songs are going to be played.

Overall, the T2s sound is really enjoyable, but for me, they are a lot better in less busy songs, but in these songs, they shine ridiculously well. It might take a while for people to really appreciate the sound quality of these IEM’s but when they do, I believe they will be amazed at how capable they are for the price point.

Fit and Comfort
For me, I have struggled with the fit. I keep on thinking that they are not in properly because they don’t create a proper seal in my ears. Subsequently, I keep on pushing them in, even though they are far as they can go. I have tried different tips, but the only tips that do fit are the smallest ones. They, however, do come with a good assortment of different sized tips, including a set of blue foam tips.

When I am heavily distracted by the music and don’t push them in most of the time, the T2s are a comfortable pair of IEM’s, I have been able to sit through long sessions without needing to take them out. You do have the option to either wear them with the cable hanging down or up and over the ear. I found them to be better secured with the cable over the ear.

Build Quality
Tanks. They are built like Tanks. They have exceptionally good build quality. They are metal, all the way through, and are machined really well that is conducive to a very nice simplistic aesthetic. They don’t really stand out, they are very subtle. I can’t really see the T2s breaking or taking damage easily, the only possible damage would be cosmetic, and that would be potential scratches from the contact of each IEM.

Tits and Tats
The T2s include, I want to say a carrying case, that is relatively large, and a detachable MMCX connector cable, that is nicely braided and relatively long. I don’t hear any cable rub which is a nice addition, and there is a plastic ring on the cable that can make the length of the cable split longer, which is useful.

Conclusion
The T2s are an excellent choice and should be considered for people that want to make an entry into the IEM world. They are a very capable performer and have a sound signature that really isn't found in many earphones let alone IEM’s at this price point, but people shouldn’t consider this the last IEM pair they need to buy, as it contains issues such as how challenging it is to make a better separation in busier tracks, but they are still a pair of IEM’s that should be considered hugely.
 
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