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X7 Plus Stereo Bluetooth Wireless Sports In-Ear HD Headphones with Memory Wire and Headset...

MEE audio X7 Plus

Rating:
4.5/5,
  • X7 Plus Stereo Bluetooth Wireless
    Sports In-Ear HD Headphones
    with Memory Wire and Headset Functionality
    High-quality wireless in-ear headset designed for active lifestyles
    Over-the-ear fit with moldable “memory wire” is secure for any activity
    Advanced Bluetooth 4.1 technology with Multipoint functionality
    High fidelity sound with aptX and AAC HD audio codec support
    Sweat-proof design with Liquipel Watersafe™ Technology
    Built-in microphone and controls for phone calls, volume, and media
    Rechargeable battery provides up to 8 hours of talk/music playback time
    Includes protective carrying case and 3 sets of eartips

Recent Reviews

  1. mark2410
    MEEaudio X7 Plus Quick Review by mark2410
    Written by mark2410
    Published Apr 15, 2016
    5.0/5,
    Pros - Sound quality. They sound glorious. Sound quality.
    Cons - Erm, I couldn’t find an UK retailers selling it. Cable is a bit short for my liking.
    MEEaudio X7 Plus Quick Review
     
    Thanks to MEEaudio for the sample
     
    Full review here http://www.head-fi.org/t/805135/meeaudio-x7-plus-review-by-mark2410
     
    Brief: Uhura’s audiophile earphones.
     
    Price:  US$100 which is about £70 before HMRC and Parcel Farce get involved.
     
    Specifications:  driver size 6 mm, frequency response 20 Hz to 20 kHz, impedance 16 Ohms at 1K, sensitivity 100±3 dB (1mW at 1KHZ), battery type 2x built-in rechargeable Li-Poly battery, music playback time 7.5 hours, talk time 8 hours, standby time 300 hours, charging time 2 hours, charging connector micro-USB, Bluetooth version 4.1, Bluetooth profiles supported A2DP, HSP, HFP, AVRCP, audio codecs supported SBC, aptX®, AAC, operating range 30 ft (10 m), Microphone Specifications, directivity omnidirectional, frequency response 100 Hz to 8 kHz, Product Details, ear coupling, intraaural (in-ear), cable length 12 inches (31 cm), detachable, weight 0.5oz (14g), water resistance technology Liquipel Watersafe™ nano-coating
     
    Accessories:  Micro-USB charging cable, 3 sets of ear tips, Carrying case, User manual
     
    Build Quality:  They all looked and felt fine.  All a bit plastic but its plastic.  Interestingly it has “Liquipel” to make it water / sweat resistant.   I wasn’t going to run them under a tap to find out but they ought to be safe no matter how sweaty you get at the gym.
     
    Isolation:  Despite being a dynamic it’s sealed and thusly it isolates rather well.  I’d be happy to use out and about or on a bus, even for the Tube or a flight in a pinch.  Obviously that correspondingly means you won’t hear wheeled death chariots if you fail to use your eyes when near traffic.
     
    Comfort/Fit:  Aside from the very short cable, which meant it was a little snig if I wanted to wear under my chin, they were great.  Absolutely not a jot of an issue with them in my ears, happy to wear all day.
     
    Aesthetics:  They, well they look fine.  I’d be lying if I said they were lookers but they look perfectly benign.  So what you’re not buying them to look at them are you.
     
    Sound:  Excellent.  Easily by a damn good margin they are the best Bluetooth earphone I’ve played with.  They may only have a little 6mm driver but the bass is glorious, the mids are great and the treble is sumptuously refined.  Their balance may not be perfect for more mainstream listeners but these are aiming for a more serious, more discerning, more audiophile listener.  With a gently sloping back slash sound signature, the bass while elevated and forceful it may not be as over blown as something’s.  Sadly too many people think more bass is the defining attribute of “better.”  These are big yes but not silly big.  The mids are a bit behind but retain ample clarity and quality.  They shine not as brightly as I might want but nevertheless they shine beautifully.  Then the treble, there is a little spike in the lower ranges but overall they are excellent.  So much refinement and a faintly gentle rounding, softening of any brutality, I’m so impressed.  Now some may want a more hard edged, brutalistic treble but I am loving them.  I honestly really cannot in any way find any aspect or attribute of the X7 PLUS that is deficient.  These are not just “good for a Bluetooth earphone” but plain and simply good  Scratch that, not just good but fantastic. 
     
    Kudos to the designers at MEEaudio, bravo good sirs, bravo.
     
    Value:  Squeee!!!   Shut up and buy a pair.
     
    Pro’s:  Sound quality.  They sound glorious.  Sound quality.
     
    Con’s:  Erm, I couldn’t find an UK retailers selling it.  Cable is a bit short for my liking.
    1. mark2410
  2. red71rum
    Great wireless headphone that works well in both the gym and office
    Written by red71rum
    Published Feb 15, 2016
    4.5/5,
    Pros - Good fit, decent battery life, good range, does not sound congested
    Cons - Ambiet noise is noticeable, Lowest volume level a little loud when paired with Iphone 6.
    I have been intrigued by the idea of Bluetooth headphones for the gym and office use for some time. I had seen users wearing Jaybird, Beats, and other brands at the gym. My problem with Beats is that they are overpriced and with exaggerated bass. I also was looking for headphones that had the aptX and AAC HD, which allows for supposed cd quality sound when I am listening to my flac or 320kbps encoded mp3 music.  Enter the Mee Audio X7 plus. My wife recently went to CES and went to the Mee audio booth and told me about the X7 Plus Bluetooth wireless headphones. I contacted Mee Audio and they sent me these X7 Plus for review.
     
    Design
    After charging the headphones, I went ahead and tried the different tips that were available. It seems that the best fit for me was the medium tip. The headphones fit a happy medium where some IEMS(in ear monitors) need to be inserted deeply into the ear canal to get a decent fit. The X7 Plus uses some of the body of the headphone to also fit inside the ear to help block out ambient noise. This might also be welcome to some who do not like the feeling of pressure with deeply inserted headphones. These headphones also utilize memory wire to keep the headphones securely in your ears. For controls the X7 Plus has a 3 button remote built in on the wire towards the right ear with 3 easy to manipulate rubberized buttons. The center button is used to turn on, pair, play and pause music. The other two buttons advance music, fast forward and rewind. Short presses of these buttons also lower and raise volume. I want to note that I do not listen to my music at loud volume, but these headphones could go loud enough, that is if you want hearing damage. There is a rubberized cinch to tighten the headphones for a tighter fit. For charging, there is a supplied micro usb cable that connects to the side of the controls to charge the X7 plus for 8 hours of playback. There is also a circular zippered case to protect the headphones when they are not in use.
    Here is what they look like when worn:

    Here are are the inline controls:

    Here is the included case:                                                        

     
    Another shot of the headphones:

     
    Apple and Android
    My main phone is a LG G3 which I have had for over a year. I have gone back and forth between Android and Iphone over the years, I am not a fan of Itunes. Anyway, I found that when starting and listening to the first track after connecting each time, that there is almost 10 second timeframe where the beginning of the first track stutters. On the my work Iphone 6 there is no hesitation\stuttering, the track plays clearly. I would also like to note that the lowest volume level when connected to the Iphone 6 was too loud for me, but my LG G3 did not have that problem.
     
    At the gym
    I next auditioned the X7 plus at my local gym where I go several times a week. I wanted to see if they could stay in while ding chin-ups, bench press, running and so on. The X7’s were used during all my workouts and they stayed in and required minimal reseating. I find nothing more irritating than having my headphones pop out during a set. I found that even while perspiring on the elliptical trainer or doing planks that the X7’s kept chugging along and I had only the occasional dropout, but that is to be expected when in an environment with so much interference from other devices. I often also forgot my phone and walked away, but the signal sometimes held past 40 feet away. I mostly had my phone on a shelf or near me while working out.
     
    At Work
    Upon first listening to them at my office, I noticed that they had a decent soundstage, the instruments had good separation, with crisp highs. For a change of pace, I listened to a best of Mozart compilation and the headphones accurately played back the tracks and they did not sound congested but rather very pleasant. I changed pace and moved to Megadeth’s Dystopia and the album sounded great, there was no harshness to the highs. I am not a bass head by any means but the bass and mid bass were very good without being overwhelming. Overall the sound was not fatiguing and I could listen to them for some time. My experience with the X7 plus at work was great. Despite right next to my server room I experience no dropouts and enjoyed not being held to one spot as I worked on building computers and so on.
    Call Quality
    I normally do not use headphones to take calls, but these did a decent job. The caller’s voice sounded clear and their voice sounded natural to me without my having to strain to hear what they were saying. You can also use the multipoint functionality so you can manage call and media from two different devices at the same time.
    Conclusion
    For $99, the Mee Audio X7 Plus are a great alternative to the other wireless headphones on the market. They sound great, have decent ambient sound blocking capabilities without being uncomfortable, and have good range without lots of signal dropouts. Mee Audio also has great customer service and is very receptive to any problems you might have.
      ehjie and SpiderNhan like this.
  3. HiFiChris
    a bassy wireless in-ear for working out
    Written by HiFiChris
    Published Feb 10, 2016
    4.0/5,
    Pros - solid value for wireless IEMs, doesn't really sound like a wireless IEM, excellent fit, quite good sound with aptX, isolation
    Cons - might be boomy for audiophile tastes, lows could be more solid and arid, large volume steps and high lowest volume
    IMG_20160128_183621.jpg
     



    Preamble:

    I am someone who does a lot of running outside, getting a couple of thousand kilometres per year on my shoes (less in the past one and a half years due to more review writing).
    Often I am using in-ears during the runs, however without any music most of the time – only after the half or in the last third, when I need some “support”, I usually occasionally start playback.
    As I often carry my mobile phone (BlackBerry Q10) with me anyways when running, especially when in the hills or forest, I then always have a source with Bluetooth with me anyway, and so I could forgo an additional DAP for the runs (usually a Sansa Clip Zip or iPod Nano 6G).

    Maybe a Bluetooth in-ear doesn’t have many additional advantages for my just mentioned main field of application, but many people who regularly go to the gym will very likely enjoy the freedom wireless in-ears offer: most people aren’t guiding the cable underneath their shirt or along their back, wherefore it can get stuck, especially when one is on the rowing machine or doing weight training; microphonics and general cable movement can be annoying as well. With wireless in-ears, the mentioned nuisance is mostly eliminated. Nonetheless, with wireless in-ears, one has to re-charge the batteries on a regular basis and the built-in active electronic components aren’t coming free of cost either.

    Before I start with my actual review, I would like to thank Mike from MEEaudio (formerly MEElectronics) for sending me an X7 Plus (http://www.meeaudio.com/X7Plus) to check out in exchange for my honest opinion.


    Technical Specifications:

    MSRP: $99.99
    Drivers: dynamic, 6 mm
    Frequency Response: 20 – 20000 Hz
    Talk/Music Playback Time: 7.5 hours
    Standby Time: 300 hours
    Bluetooth Version: 4.1
    Operation Range: 30 ft/10 m
    Bluetooth Profiles Supported: A2DP, HSP, HFP, AVRCP
    Bluetooth Audio Codecs Supported: SBC, AAC, aptX


    Delivery Content:

    The packaging is designed in the typical MEE style, however there is more text on it than usual. The front shows a picture of the in-ears on white background, next to the model number with description. The magnetically attached front can be opened up like a book cover and then shows a listing of the features on the left and a transparent plastic window with the X7 Plus behind on the right side.
    The sides show the technical specifications and tell what’s included.
    The back contains an in-depth description of the features in multiple languages.
    Inside, next to the in-ears are a micro USB cable for charging, a round carrying case, three pairs of silicone tips as well as a user manual.
     

    IMG_20160128_182434.jpg   IMG_20160128_182458.jpg
    IMG_20160128_182512.jpg   IMG_20160128_182617.jpg
    IMG_20160128_182734.jpg   IMG_20160128_183003.jpg



    Looks, Feels, Build Quality:

    The waterproof (which can be very handy for sports) in-ears are made of matte black hard plastic which is very sturdy and doesn’t feel really cheap at all. The part where the cable enters the bodies is made of chrome-look plastic. On the insides are easily readable side markers, the outsides each show a MEE logo.
    The bodies are ergonomically shaped and rather largely built, for the electronics and batteries.
    The remote control with rubberised buttons has got a flap that covers the micro USB charging socket.
    The short connection cable between both in-ear bodies has got good strain relief and is quite flexible as well.
     

    IMG_20160128_183548.jpg   IMG_20160128_183621.jpg
    IMG_20160128_183709.jpg   IMG_20160128_183732.jpg
    IMG_20160128_183745.jpg   IMG_20160128_184111.jpg
    IMG_20160128_184144.jpg   IMG_20160128_184212.jpg



    Buttons, Features:

    The remote control has got three buttons that act for playback and volume control as well as for powering on/off and pairing.
    Pushing and holding the centre button for about five seconds, the in-ears are set into pairing mode; holding the button for three seconds turns the X7 Plus on respectively off. All actions are acknowledged by a voice command which is however quite loud.
    A small LED on the remote control gives information about the status.

    The buttons are easily tactile and have got a pleasant pressure point.

    What I as person who listens at rather low volume kind of dislike is the overall volume – both with my BlackBerry Q10 as well as iPhone 4, there is only a uniform volume control without the ability of limiting the volume which is very loud in the lowest setting. In addition, the volume steps are a bit rough and not as fine-grained as I’d like to.


    Comfort, Isolation:

    The in-ears are quite large, but that’s actually quite a good thing for my large ears, as the in-ear bodies sit very comfortably and quite securely in my conchas – people with small ears however could get some problems with the size. The in-ears’ weight is by the way very low and I don’t notice the X7 Plus after insertion.
    The in-ears are supposed to be worn with the cables over the ears, wherefore the “ear-hooks” are reinforced with metal wire and mouldable. For people who are new to this, it might feel strange at first, but trust me (who uses more professional in-ears with memory wire for a few years) that this kind of style is better that the usual “cables down” method, as comfort, fit and seat are improved while reducing microphonics. In this case, there are no microphonics at all and the freedom of the wireless connection is very pleasant, too – no cables that can be annoying at times are in the way and one can turn the head without noticing any cable at all.
    With the S-shaped tool, the cable can be tightened up behind the head, so the already excellent fit and seat gets even slightly better.

    The bodies are closed, therefore isolation is clearly above average.


    Battery:

    The in-ears offer up to 8 hours of non-stop operation/music playback time, which is an excellent value considering that these are in-ears, and it is appropriate for longer runs with non-stop music as well. I haven’t explicitly tested operation time with a stopwatch, but the in-ears gave me around 8 hours in daily use, so I think it is correct.


    Sound:

    My source devices were the BlackBerry Q10 (aptX codec) and iPhone 4 (AAC codec). Music was mainly stored in FLAC format, however I also used MP3s and AACs.

    Tonality:

    For the purpose as sports in-ears, tonal tuning is adequate and expresses itself in a v-shape, which means that bass and treble are emphasised.

    From 20 to 180 Hz, lows are evenly and quite strongly emphasised by about 10 dB. From 180 to 600 Hz, level drops evenly. Besides the present bass with strong mid- and upper bass, it is mainly the fundamental tone area that is very prominent in the low root which adds fullness and warmness to the lows, resulting in an even slightly fuller sound impression. As a result, lower mids are a bit (however not too much) thickened.
    Between 1 and 2 kHz, level is a bit in the background but starts rising again already after 2 kHz. At 3 kHz, I can hear a small peak, the next and bigger one follows at 7. In the upper treble I can hear two peaks at 11 and 13 kHz that are about as present as the one at 7. Although treble sounds slightly artificial, it is quite consistently bright, however neither harsh nor cutting.
    Voices are a bit warmer due to the lower mids’ and fundamental tone’s emphasis, but the emphasis at 3 kHz compensates for that, wherefore tonal balance in the mids is still right and voices don’t really sound alienated.
    Treble is about half as present as the bass; the mids are, typically for this kind of tuning, more in the background.

    For the purpose and the general preference of most people for it, the tuning is quite spot-on and will please many. Personally, I would wish little less bass and fundamental tone emphasis (but I am also someone who “privately” usually listens to more neutral/balanced in-ears like the UE600, UE900 or Apple EarPods for sports).

    Resolution:

    Buying a wireless headphone, it should be clear that one can’t expect the same quality as from a wired headphone that retails for the same price – a wireless headphone aims at a different target audience and purpose, and the X7 Plus fits very well into it.

    Provided using a source device with a good Bluetooth chip and the support of valuable wireless codecs, it is just barely noticeable that the X7 Plus is a wireless in-ear. With the iPhone (AAC codec) and BlackBerry (aptX codec), sound was identical and the only clue that the MEE could be a wireless IEM was in the treble, although I wasn’t even sure whether what I heard were very little treble artefacts or just the peak at 7 kHz – that speaks for X7 Plus’ Bluetooth chip’s implementation quality. Using my laptop as source that only supports the inferior SBC codec (there are devices with SBC codec that sound decent, however my laptop definitely does not belong to that sort), the X7 Plus gets debunked as Bluetooth in-ear very quickly which is audible in less dynamics and evident treble artefacts.
    The bass is quite quick in impact for a dynamic driver, however rather slow and soft in decay, making it appear more full-bodied and voluminous. As an effect of the tuning, the mids are in the background and don’t make the X7 Plus the best in-ear for mid-heavy music, however there are no audible flaws in the midrange either although it is not the most detailed one. The treble seems relatively differentiated and doesn’t sound like uniform ringing but is quite detailed.
    In my opinion, the in-ears are definitely worth the asked price, considering that they are Bluetooth earphones. I even think that their value is pretty decent for what they are.

    What I’m hearing from the X7 Plus is very solid – overall, the in-ears are quite convincing regarding sound quality and about comparable with the MEE M6 Pro, with about similar differentiation, well distinguishable treble, identical detail retrieval, however M6 Pro’s bass is somewhat more arid and a bit less blunt. For the price and as a Bluetooth in-ear, resolution and audio quality are quite decent and appropriate.

    Soundstage:

    The soundstage is about averagely wide and a bit deeper than average, with a good coherence and naturalness.
    Instrument separation is a little worse than average, with instruments that sound a little foggily placed in the imaginary room; reducing the fundamental tone doesn’t help with that, but for the purpose, the soundstage is okay and doesn’t appear negative.


    Conclusion:

    Who is looking for a solid wireless in-ear with a bassy, full-bodied v-shaped sound signature should look into the MEE X7 Plus. The value for the money is pretty good and for the price as well as the fact that these are Bluetooth in-ears, sound is also pretty good when paired with a source device with good Bluetooth chip and better transmission codecs, although the lows could be a bit faster as well as precise and the soundstage slightly less foggy.
    However, what I as someone who listens at rather low volume levels find quite bothering is the quite high lowest volume along with the rather large volume adjustment steps.

    For someone who is looking for wireless sports IEMs with a v-shaped signature that focusses on a present, thick bass and emphasised treble, the MEE X7 Plus is a recommendable product.

    3.8 out of 5 stars.
      twister6 likes this.
    1. View previous replies...
    2. red71rum
      @HiFiChris Interesting, although I don't think regular people that do not come to Head-fi would complain. They generally want really loud headphones(with lots of bass also of course). It is making me think twice before getting the IPhone 7, aside from the fact that I hate ITunes and there supposedly will be no regular headphone jack. I liked your review by the way.
      red71rum, Feb 17, 2016
    3. HiFiChris
      @red71rum 
       
      Yeah, actually in most cases the iPhone's volume control remains active and can be used as some sort of pre-gain that can be reduced in order to get more fine-grained volume attenuation steps with the Bluetooth headphone and to generally achieve a lower listening level. Unfortunately not with the X7 Plus.
      HiFiChris, Feb 17, 2016
    4. red71rum
      @HiFiChris I talked to their tech support via email and they said it was the first they had heard of it. I referenced our reviews here and they found it interesting. With low impedance wired headphones I usually use an external volume limiter in the chain between the source and headphone. I have the Beats Powerbeats2 that I was given and they are not good at all. Now my Plantronics Backbeat Pro's are pretty decent and I have do not have the volume problem with them.
      red71rum, Feb 17, 2016

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