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HiFiMAN RE-400

Rating:
4.21154/5,
  1. flognarde
    Smooth and well balanced IEM's
    Written by flognarde
    Published Jul 13, 2016
    4.5/5,
    Pros - Delicate and trully musical, timbres, fatigueless
    Cons - Very slightly warm sounding, not as spacious as other's
    I am only listening to acoustic music, So I had no issue with the amount of bass (only plugged to my FIIO X5II, Flac, APE, Highres and DSD files). Even though they are not as tight as on my Shure's Se425 they are well balanced with the rest of the spectrum.
    Slightly on the warm side but perfectly balanced, not in the face , musical, smooth apart from a little peak on the high mids, they have an amazing respect for the timbres, which is for me the main point.
    The relative lack of definition participate to how "liquid" the music is just like in concert. Everything is integrated in a delightfull way, not much sticks out.
    On some tracks I was expecting a little bit more dynamics but I have never heard a pair of IEM's that accomodate so many different style of recordings. 
    Bought second hand (perfect condition) for 40€, it's the bargain of the century.
    Higly recommended for classical music lovers.
  2. AvidlyEclectic
    Sound is worth $300, build quality is worth $20
    Written by AvidlyEclectic
    Published Jul 2, 2015
    4.5/5,
    Pros - Absolutely heavenly sound. Unbeatable at this price point
    Cons - Build quality on my unit is a joke. Cable is falling apart 2 days in.
    ***This is a tl;dr: review. please refer to other reviews for a more in-depth analysis on their amazing sound.***

    For $100, you simply won't be getting anything better sound-wise than these cans, and a lot of happy owners will back me on this one. The mids are heavenly, the treble is smooth yet detailed, and the bass is tight and accurate. However, don't buy them just yet. The build quality is not up to scratch. In fact, when I asked the saleslady for these cans, she immediately suggested that I get it recabled from the get go. How I wish I took her advice. Barely 48 hours in and the cable on the right earpiece is fraying, just below the strain relief. The copper has gotten exposed, and while photos might not do them justice, and while $100 is relatively cheap in audiophilia, it is ridiculous that they are showing signs of tear 2 days in.Absolute let-down. Granted, YMMV, and I might have gotten a faulty unit because some owners have owned them for years and theirs are still apparently alive; however, if you plan to use them on the go or while exercising, look somewhere else, or get them recabled.

    I will update this review if my unit breaks. It's a shame really, I dig the sound so much. If they do break, I'll definitely be getting them recabled at cost. I dig the sound that much. Photo of the fraying cable below.

    image.jpg
      G_T_J likes this.
    1. lin0003
      They sound good for $100, but they are easily outclassed by the Titan 1. I actually didn't have those build quality issues with mine though, maybe you can send them in for warranty? 
      lin0003, Jul 2, 2015
    2. getclikinagas
      @AvidlyEclectic : I haven't had issues with my pair (over 1.5 years now) save a slight nick at the Y split. If you are a careful user, RMA them, and if they last for more than 7-8 months,you've probably received a good pair. BTW, where will you be doing the re-cabling, if needed?
       
      Hi @lin0003. Love your reviews.
      I feel the RE400 and Titan 1 differ in their base signature(Mid forward vs Slight V), which makes it difficult for me to place one over the other (personal sig preferences aside)
      getclikinagas, Jul 2, 2015
    3. AvidlyEclectic
      @lin0003 I wish I could, but I'm from the Philippines and sending it to hifiman will easily cost as much as the iem itself. I'll try my luck at the store I bought them from though.

      @getclikinagas just the local audiophile store I bought it from, Egghead. I think the owner has a head-fi account.
      AvidlyEclectic, Jul 2, 2015
  3. Garraty
    HifiMAN's Magnum Opus
    Written by Garraty
    Published Jun 18, 2014
    4.5/5,
    Pros - Balanced yet slightly warm and sweet, beautiful and realistic mids, price
    Cons - Lack of sub-bass and a tad sparkle, microphonics
    After I bought the HD 598s, I was soon looking for a portable set of headphones or IEMs for casual use on the bus or outside. Sure enough, I found the lauded HifiMAN RE-400 to be an interesting option and even with concerns of durability and the possibility that a neutral sound signature wasn't for me, I bit the bullet. Were they worth it? 
     
    Comfort, Design and Accessories:
     
    I found the RE-400's to be well-designed overall, featuring a rather large plug and a cable comprised of both cloth and rubber. The drivers and the casings surrounding the drivers are rather small, which is a definite plus for portability. They also come with a wide array of tips and a rather convenient little case that can hold some extra tips and the RE-400 itself. I myself found most of the tips uncomfortable and stuck with the smallest tips but with the plethora of choices at hand, one can easily find a fit comfortable for them. To note, the RE-400's can sometimes be annoyingly microphonic at the rubber part of the cable in particular but this can be somewhat avoided by wearing them over the ear.
     
    Though I've heard the cases of unpleasant durability, so far that doesn't seem to be true and these seem like they'll last easily for another two years. As far as comfort goes, I find the RE-400 to be satisfactory but not perfect. The fit is fairly comfortable but over time it can get warm and unpleasant in my experience for listening sessions over an hour or two. Perhaps with other tips this can be remedied but I haven't found that to be the case. Isolation for the RE-400's is average for the most part and even with a good fit, much of the background noise around myself is still discernible.
     
     
    Sound Quality:
     
    Overall, I found the RE-400's to be easily satisfactory for my musical listening purposes. The sound signature of the RE-400's does seem to be neutral and balanced but as many have noted, is also warm and sweet which makes the RE-400's sound detailed yet not analytical.
     
    The treble of the IEMs is well-extended and definitely unfatiguing with a small amount of sparkle in the upper regions of frequencies. Drums and cymbals sound detailed and well-presented without being overly detailed and sibilant. However, this can at times sound a bit too smooth and without more sparkle, instruments and electric guitars in particular don't sound completely realistic. (when I hear a violin, I expect to hear some bite on the sustained, higher notes but the RE-400's present them without much harshness)
     
    Mids on the IEMs are wonderful, bring very realistic and slightly forward in its presentation. In particular, guitars and vocals sound beautiful and almost immersive with detail to attention in the depth of vocals and string instruments such as violins and cellos. Most impressively, I can hear the breaths of vocals and little footsteps which I hadn't heard before in my music. However, male vocals, though sounding beautiful can come off as a tad dry and not quite as lush as I'd like but at this price point, it's to be expected and so this is a very small concern.
     
    Initially, the bass of the RE-400's seemed far too anemic and lacking, especially the sub-bass. I expected this and waited to burn them in for about 50-100 hours before deciding my feelings on the bass. After burning them in and getting used to the sound signature, bass seemed much more present than beforehand and even though I still feel there is a lack of sub-bass, I'm pleased. Bass overall is well extended (perhaps even more than my HD598!) and is tight and fast, which I appreciate.
     
    The soundstage on the RE-400's is slightly better than what I expected pretty much at the price point and the design and it does seem reasonably wide and tall enough. Curiously enough, the soundstage seems to be slightly angled. I don't know if I'm imagining this but it really does seem to be angled and it sounds a bit more 3-D than what I expected from these. 
     
    In short, the RE-400's sound wonderful with a warm, sweet neutral sound signature and a satisfactory soundstage. Though I have minor problems with the treble, mids and the bass, this is due more to the fact I prefer a slightly more colored presentation and so these are really good all-rounder portable IEMs at this price especially. The RE-400's are great all-rounders but if you are looking for a headphone/IEM that can deal with more electronic and hip hop music of that sort, you're better off looking for something else.
     
    Value:
     
    To conclude, the RE-400's are most definitely worth the $99 price tag. These don't require an amp but it does benefit a bit from amping if you wish from my own experience. More to the point, these are a great value and it does seem like HifiMAN has made a new waterline for the $99 IEM. These hit a rare balance in sound, good overall balance and detail yet pleasantly warm with an angled soundstage. Companies will be surely trying for years before they succeed in producing an IEM equal or better to the RE-400's. Right now these are only $99, a price that HifiMAN could've made $199 and costumers would still be satisfied. 
     
     
    Albums Used:
     
    Belle and Sebastion- If You're Feeling Sinister
    Daft Punk- Discovery
    Jeff Buckley- Grace
    Living Stereo: Bruch Violin Concerto No.1; Scottish Fantasy & Vieuxtemps: Violin Concerto No. 5
    Nirvana- In Utero
    Radiohead- In Rainbows
    Wilco- Yankee Hotel Foxtrot
      Claritas likes this.
    1. View previous replies...
    2. TRapz
      Thank you, that was very helpful.
      TRapz, Oct 2, 2014
    3. rockaphile21
      wow, great review.
      i have a question. is RE-400 good at music with many layers (some prog rock, Radiohead,...) ?
      i know it's neutral and musical at the same time but it's keen on separating layers/instruments or mixing them ?
      rockaphile21, Nov 18, 2014
    4. Garraty
      Haven't heard these in a while as I just wanted to try them out (later selling them to get the Modi instead, not the fault of the RE-400's themselves) but from memory, instrumental separation was pretty good and smaller details that were obscured by my HD598 could be heard. They're not detail freaks by any means, but they hold a fair amount of detail done in a pleasant, warm manner. 
       
      Hope that helped!
      Garraty, Nov 21, 2014
  4. onionskin
    Another fine offering Dr. Bian
    Written by onionskin
    Published Apr 6, 2014
    4.5/5,
    Pros - Cost, impedance, accessories...HiFIMan sound
    Cons - I like the fit of my old RE-262 better
    I got these as a backup to my RE-262.  I wanted something I could run without an amp.  The 400 provides that refined HiFiMan sound I have come to admire.  The 400 absolutely squares up with my 262 when amped, but I really got them so I could run lighter (just a dap), they totally impress in this regard.
    I think I may be the only one that really liked the twist-to-lock fit of the 262, they just work perfectly for me.  Moving around I loose the seal on the 400 a bit too easily, but there was a generous helping of tips to play with including comply which I have never tried.  I am quickly becoming a comply convert.
     
    Phone + amp + dap too much for your pockets?  Need to simplify?  this may be the solution.  It works for me, I don't mind leaving the amp behind any more.  The RE-400 fills the void until I can plug into a full size rig. 
    For a Benjamin the cost to quality balance on these is stone solid.  They look great, sound great, and anything can play them.  Build quality looks like a nice step up from previous generations of HiFiMan portable gear too.
     
    A word of caution:
    While any flea-powered source can drive these, this is a high quality IEM, they will reveal how horrible music sounds on your phone...regardless of encoding, regardless of make.  You can listen to your phone with the RE-400, but to hear them you still need a decent dap (sansa clip is disposable at $40 and still sounds about 1000x better than your phone...ok, maybe 100x better than the htc one).
      majo123 likes this.
    1. Dog meat
      good review! I love these, got the 400B version. Was sitting on sennheiser ie-6 iems for 2.5 years, which were much more expensive. RE 400 just wipes the floor with ie 6. Of course, the sound signature is different, but the sound of re 400 is just much more "mature", without that stupid mid bass hump of senns. 
      Dog meat, Apr 7, 2014
  5. getclikinagas
    RE-400 Waterline: Audiophile kill, Budget bullet.
    Written by getclikinagas
    Published Dec 19, 2013
    4.5/5,
    Pros - Magical mids. Warm lilt in the neutral sig. Fast, accurate and punchy mid-bass. Extremely comfortable. Easily driven,
    Cons - Sub-bass presence is low. Treble might be too smooth for some. Isolation is average
    Packaging and build
    The packaging is minimal and exquisitely so. The extra tips filters and manual are behind the felt coated foam holding the earphones. As I gingerly dislodged them from the grooves, I was struck by how tiny they are. I always try to avoid gripping the strain relief as a precaution, but it was difficult considering the size. The shiny bead blasted aluminium back goes well with the brushed aluminium housing. Which brings me to the build. This is the most common qualm people have reported. The plug is beefy, the y split seems sturdy enough. However, I noticed that some free movement of the cable is possible at the entry point of the strain relief. As long as the cable is secured properly within the main housing this shouldn't be an issue. (I was tempted to add a dab of glue at the strain relief end to restrict that free movement).
    The half and half cable is… okay. The cloth half is a little kinky (pun not intended). The sticky half is thin and flexible making it very comfortable when worn over ear. Apparently, the hybrid design serves to reduce weight among other benefits.
     
    Accessories, Comfort and Isolation:
    Tips galore but an odd assortment. Anyway, I have very narrow ear canals and the smaller tips gave me a good seal. The pseudo-double bump tips gave me pressure problems, so I settled for the bar-tips. The complys are good, but the foam overhangs (ahead of the rubber tube) get scrunched. (I have modified them by cutting off the overhangs) Cable noise is more than present when worn cable-down. Almost disappears when worn over-ear. Can hardly feel then in my ears after a while. It is evident that the HiFiman team has paid a lot of attention to ergonomics. Other accessories include a shirt clip, 5 pairs of stock filters. I have dry wax so I won’t be changing them out anytime soon. Perhaps I could use them to hard EQ them (doubling the filters, felt mod etc.) Maybe later.
    Isolation is average, even with a good fit. But maybe that’s about as good as it gets for vented earphones. The vent is placed ventrally and only the deepest fit might shield it partially.
     
    Sound:
    A short intro/disclaimer My experience when it comes to iems is very limited. The RE400 is my first foray into audiophile territory. I’ve been in a V/U-shaped bassy world thus far. 
    Chronologically....Sony MDR-E818LP>Sony MDR-EX35LP>Creative EP-630>Xears TD4 Ebony Blackwood>Brainwavz R1>HiFiman RE-400
    I’ve loved and hated every set. So I set my sights higher and decided to bravely plunge into a neutral world just to see if that was the right direction for me.
    Doing an A:B comparison doesn't make much sense with iems that differ this widely.
    My impressions may seem overblown to some. But such a drastic change in direction can do that. Back to the review I expected to be disappointed by the RE-400 in the bass department. I like a little rumble and feel in my bass. But given my inexperience, I was very curious about bass quality vs quantity.
     
    Fast forward to my impressions… I initially thought of describing it by music genre. But after a week with them, I’ve decided to go ahead with the classic break-up.
     
    Treble:
    I’ve always found sharp treble to be off-putting. There is a (false?) sense of enhanced clarity that comes with sparkly treble. But for me, the overall enjoyability dips. I’m absolutely amazed by how smooth the treble is on the RE-400. Some may like a little more sparkle, its sooo perfectly where I want it to be. It may lack some bite with fast electronic music. I found no nasty peaks or dips. To me, the detail and clarity was eye widening (considering my experience or lack thereof).
     
    Mids: 
    I was expecting to be impressed. But not blindsided like this. It felt like I had suddenly switched from 192kbps to a vinyl track. The first thing that struck me was how much more life-like it felt. The vocals had a certain texture. Simply put, if that texture was absent, the vocals wouldn't be as immersive. A striking feature was the depth to the vocals (not necessarily to the soundstage). It sounded “wholesome”(male and female alike). I’m finding this very hard to describe but I must persist, because it’s that important. I am able to gauge how much breath and effort the singer is taking. Apart from the core vocals I hear a lot of nuances and details that contribute to that sense of “completion”. This particular feature impressed me the most in this iem. Another thing I noticed is how untouched and unaffected the mids are. No matter how busy rest of the spectrum gets, the mids always come through unadulterated. Like I had a separate pair of ears for the mids. And it seemed like the bass and highs complemented it nicely. Like they were all on the same plane of preference.
     
    Bass: 
    I will have to divide this segment into two. Initial impressions and Brain-burnt–in impressions.
    Initial: Sub-bass felt non-existent. Some tracks need that sub-bass to sound right. It adds to the ‘natural, warm’ feeling. Sub-bass is more ‘feeling’ than ‘hearing’. Tracks that had a strong mid-bass component were handled beautifully. I couldn’t believe the detail and how fast it sounded. But I would have liked some more punch. Sadly the mids keep grabbing the spotlight therefore I didn’t get to try many bass heavy tracks.
    Brain-burnt in: Sub-bass still felt weak. I do see they measure near flat through the bass, but they could do with more presence in the sub-bass. I did find out at higher listening volumes, that the RE-400 extends pretty deep. I feel the punch in the mid-bass now(I think it feels more apparent when you get accustomed to the signature). I find the quantity sufficient(not lacking) now. Surprisingly enough, I’m actually enjoying them immensely. I love the attack speed and the detail, even when it gets busy. I want to say “resolving” but I’m not sure if it is the correct term. I’m quite stunned to find myself enjoying this “type” of bass. The initial disappointment only surfaces when I find the sub-bass lacking. ljokerl advised me to try a “narrow” lift of a few dB in the sub-bass. This improves presence without affecting the mid-bass or the mids. The RE-400 is a very capable iem in this respect. The overall tonality has warmed and I’m not disappointed as often. I still find myself wanting a bit more presence but I don’t think EQing it in is the answer. (Perhaps a vent redesign, dampers coupled with a sub-bass lift). Drums sound very natural (except the deepest reaching ones). It’s easy to differentiate between the types of drums. The bass conveys that much detail.
    Bottom line: Bass enjoyment is very track subjective. EQing helps because the drivers are capable
    Extra tip: The EQ in Poweramp for Android (with the DVC audio setting enabled) is very effective in boosting the sub-bass without "upsetting the tonal balance"
    Other miscellaneous rambling:
    The soundstage isn't the widest. The Brainwavz R1 has spoiled me in this regard. But it isn’t congested either. It conveys a good sense of space. Vocals can be very very intimate. And orchestras can be sufficiently spacious. No complaints there. All the music components are clearly positioned and layered without any interference. I believe that is good “imaging”?
     
    Like I mentioned before, I sense an overall “completion” in the music. Vocals will have a ‘bass’ component and a ‘lower highs’ component in addition to the core “mid” component. The RE-400 delivers all of it in equal measure (just a tad more in the mids). I have observed that they sound even better at higher volumes (+1/2 dB above normal listening volume).
     
    I am curious to as to how the RE-400 will perform when powered by a better source. That will have to wait as I don’t have the resources :frowning2:
     
    Some have reported good results by using dampers to add a little warmth and presence (even going as far to comparing it to the 400$ RE-600). I will try these mods later on.
     
    Conclusion: This iem was meant to be a test, an experiment. My first foray into neutral audiophile territory. And they have surprised me. They have made me second guess my sound sig preference. I know what I want now (until the next revelation). But what I want now is so different from what I wanted, I doubt I’ll ever have such a drastic change of heart.
    I expected it to fit a small segment of my music but I’m shocked at the versatility and satisfaction it has given me in most of my music.
     
    I have a very non-technical way of knowing when music sounds really good to me. It has nothing to do with genre, mood or content. It depends solely on raw music quality. This happens to me with “certain tracks” that span a wide genre(Examples: Imogen Heap- Let go, Jasmine Thompson - Home, Mick MCauley & Winifred Horan - A Daisy in December, Eminem- Sing for the moment etc). Well….. My eyes well up. Not related to feelings of sadness, happiness etc. My eyes simply leak a lot of tears without warning(freaked me out the first time). Let’s just say, I can’t see through the haze of tears when I have the RE-400 on. It’s only happened with the Fidelio L1, some active speaker I can’t remember, rarely with the Brainwavz R1.
     
    The RE-400s have set the bar very high for me. If these had a more sub-bass presence I would have absolutely nothing to complain about. I think finding something much better will be very difficult unless I burn my wallet, so I will now look for an iem to complement (not beat) the RE-400.
     
    Credits:
    @esantosh for all the advice he’s given me. And for replying to my monotonous PMs.
    @modulor@Tom22 for their detailed and comforting words from a very understanding POV.
    Big ups to HiFinage for bringing HiFiman to India.
     
    Edit: I have rephrased by impressions of the sub-bass. It is my first review, and a year and a lot more experience later, I do feel my wording was not an accurate representation of what I felt regarding the sub-bass.
    HiFiMAN has now reduced the price to 79$. The 100$ market is very competitive and the new price gives it even better value.
    1. View previous replies...
    2. getclikinagas
      @Thiagolcst : It's a good thing HiFiman Customer service is top notch, although the build quality isn't. Still, they have come a long way considering their last line of iems.
      Sad thing is, many people are put off because of durability concerns even though the sound is unbelievable at this price. It is worth the risk though :)
      us baby the hell outta them :p
      getclikinagas, Dec 20, 2013
    3. mochill
      Gr07 mkii is the upgrade your looking for and built quality is top notch from vsonic...check out eBay the seller bigbarginonline is selling the newest version of them, they cost $119...totally worth the price :smiley:
      mochill, Dec 21, 2013
    4. getclikinagas
      @mochill 
      The GR07 did seem like the logical upgrade. But, I think the prone-to-sibilance treble would be off putting to me(or is that not an issue with the MKii?).
      That said, I am looking forward to the VSD7 :)
      getclikinagas, Dec 21, 2013
  6. a_recording
    RE-400: A Reference Design
    Written by a_recording
    Published May 19, 2013
    4.5/5,
    Pros - Sensible and comfortable design, balanced sound quality, fantastic value
    Cons - Overly large plug, sparse included accessory selection
    Along with the summary below, I have posted a Youtube video review of the RE-400. If you like the video, check out my channel for more reviews :)
     

     
    Summary
     
    BUILD
     
    The RE-400 has a sensible, well thought out design. Of special note is the half-rubber / fabric cord which cuts down on microphonics. The RE-400 is comfortable to wear with cable up and the metal earpieces seem quite durable. However I find the plug to be overly large and can be difficult to accomodate in some pockets. The included accessory selection is quite poor, with only a few tip sizes included. Unfortunately I could not get a good seal with any of the tips and ended up using Sony hybrids, so please bear this in mind when reading the following sound impressions.
     
    SOUND
     
    The RE-400 has a neutral, smooth sound with perhaps a slight emphasis on the lower mid-bass, though this is certainly no bass head earphone. Everything is very tight, very fast and this is truly an amazing performer - not even considering the price at this point. Soundstage is not immediately very wide however, and people after something with a wider soundstage should perhaps look at the Sony MDR 7550.
     
    Overall
     
    I think despite the small issues I have with the RE-400, it offers absolutely stunning value at the $99 price point and really lays down a challenge to other manufacturers. As a neutral IEM the RE-400 stands shoulder to shoulder with other good dynamic options like the VSonic GR07 and Sony 7550, and does it at a lower price and better ergonomics. I absolutely applaud HiFiMan for the sharp pricing on the RE-400 and would heartily recommend it to almost anyone.
    1. Lifted Andreas
      Great review! Wonder how these do with Trance music and EDM in general?
      Lifted Andreas, Dec 11, 2013
    2. Macedo
      I'm not sure these would be a better purchase than the shure se-315. If only I had a chance to try them both...
      (By the way I'm that guy who is bugging you on twitter over the shure se-315. Thanks for the help!)
      Macedo, Apr 21, 2014
  7. adrift02
    Fantastic IEMs, worth every penny. Not for bass-heads.
    Written by adrift02
    Published Apr 19, 2013
    4.5/5,
    Pros - Presence and detail are fantastic. The hint of warmth really makes for a smooth sound. No sibilance that I can find. I received a zip clamshell case!
    Cons - Lack of sub-bass hurts certain genres.
    Basically, these IEMs blow away the cheaper stuff I've owned (CX300-II, MH1C). They really make a slew of genres and tracks sing with great presence and detail without a "harsh" sound or sibilance.
     
    Coming from bass-heavy IEMs, they definitely lack sub-bass. But for most genres it's not an issue. And for the most part, the E11 amp (EQ bass boost option) can kick that up to where it's needed when it's needed.
     
    Also of note, apparently Head-Direct is sending a carrying case now (I received a zip, clamshell hard case).
    1. trinilove
      damn..mine doesnt have the case..anyways these babies really sound fantastic..5 out of 5 stars
      trinilove, Apr 20, 2013
    2. cellhead
      Pretty dissapointed with mine, virtually no bass, easily overdriven.
      cellhead, Mar 17, 2014
    3. adrift02
      So thought I'd update this review to note that I purchased the 400i model last year (inline mic/remote), and the sound quality was significantly worse. Mainly on the low end -- they sounded very thin and weren't as enjoyable as my original pair. I ended up soldering a new jack on my old pair and gave the 400i to my mom. I can't say how many hours she's put on them, but they don't sound any better, so it's not a break-in issue. 
      adrift02, Nov 8, 2016
  8. TheGame21x
    All Round and Back Again
    Written by TheGame21x
    Published Apr 11, 2013
    4.5/5,
    Pros - Neutral, Detailed, Extension on both ends, Comfortable, Inexpensive
    Cons - Sometimes microphonic, No included carrying case
    [​IMG]
     
    Thanks to the folks at HiFiMan for sending me a sample of their latest IEM to review.

    Introduction

    Around here, HiFiMan needs no introduction. I first learned of them in early 2010, back when they were known as Head-Direct (which is still the name of their web store) and I purchased the RE0 after my faithful V-Moda Bass-Freq IEMs gave up the ghost and reading impressions on Head-Fi. Since then I’ve been a fan and I’ve reviewed a few of their products over the past three years. So, when the RE-400 was released, I was pretty excited to give them a listen. So, does the RE-400 have what it takes to carry on the HiFiMan legacy? Read on to find out.
     
    Packaging and Accessories: The packaging is comprised of a long, rectangular black box with a translucent plastic outer sheath covering the IEMs, nestled within a thick foam insert. Accessories include four pairs of silicone tips ranging from a simple single flange set to two sets of new biflange tips and familiar black large biflange tips, similar to those included with previous models. Also included is a white rubbery cable winder, a bit of a superfluous accessory in my book, one that I would rather have seen omitted in favor of a proper carrying case.
     
    Design and Build Quality: The metal housings are made of anodized aluminum with familiar long strain reliefs exiting the silver housings into a plasticky black cable that joins at the y-split and is from there sheathed in black nylon and terminates in a beefy and well relieved 45 degree L plug. I’m not a fan of the nylon sheathing as it makes the cable quite noisy and prone to distracting microphonics but on the whole, the IEM seems well constructed.
     
    Comfort and Isolation: Being fairly small straight barrel dynamics, isolation is about average but long term comfort was quite good. As mentioned above, the RE-400 is annoyingly prone to microphonic noise but this issue can be mitigated (for the most part) by wearing them over the ear.
     
    [​IMG]

    Sound Quality

    Given my experience with so many of HiFiMan’s back catalog of IEMs, I had a general idea of the type of sound signature to expect from the RE-400 and actually listening to them didn’t surprise me much in that regard. The RE-400s focus on neutrality, offering a mostly uncolored and nearly ruler flat audio presentation. But unlike its forebears, the RE0, it lacks the thinness present in that ‘phone. But let’s start at the bottom and work our way up, shall we?
     
    The low end response is different from other HiFiMan IEMs in that it’s…well…present. Now don’t go thinking that this is the sort of bass that’ll shake your eardrums because it’s not but it possesses more body and texture and a bit more depth than the RE0 and RE-ZERO could muster. They have the ability to reach very low, with little discernible roll off even down to 20 Hz. Because of this, it has enough grunt that I’m not left wanting more.
     
    The midrange is smooth and, though a bit dry like its precursors (RE-262 exempted), is more liquid and detail rich than either the RE0 or the RE-ZERO. Detail retrieval is excellent and they’re remarkably transparent but I’m impressed more by the spaciousness of the sound. Though the soundstage itself isn’t especially large in comparison to, say the Triple.Fi 10 or the RE-262, it is larger than average and separation within the stage, not to mention stereo imaging, is great.
     
    [​IMG]
     
    Treble is right in line with every other frequency in the spectrum in that it is neither forward nor recessed. It’s quite linear and airy, detailed and clear. There’s plenty of sparkle and shimmer without sounding overly metallic and sibilance is non-existent. Top end extension is fantastic, rivaling the RE-ZERO and giving the omnipresent treble of the RE0 a clear run for its money.
     
    The result is a tonally neutral, linear presentation that is absolutely phenomenal. Yeah, I know this sounds like hyperbole but it isn’t. It has certain seductive qualities that belie its true abilities, luring you in with its completely inoffensive sound signature and allowing the detail to sink in rather than shoving it in your face the way the Rock-It Sounds R-50 does. The RE-400 doesn’t try to impress with aggressive detailing or a presentation that errs on one side of neutral or another or emphasize one frequency range (mids, treble, bass) at the expense of the others. But, oddly enough, it’s because the RE-400 doesn’t try to sound great that it actually does. This is one of the few IEMs in my collection I’d truly say sounds “effortless”. It doesn’t try to sound as good as it does, it just…does.
     
    One issue I have to note is that they’re perhaps a bit too polite in their resolution of tracks. They aren’t as unforgiving as the R-50 and are generally quite smooth in that regard. Personally, I didn’t find this to be an issue because it isn’t really a knock against their overall sound quality.
     
    [​IMG]

    Conclusion

    The HiFiMan RE-400 is available from head-direct.com for $99 and at that price, they are highly competitive. At $50 cheaper than the now discontinued RE-262 and $20 cheaper than the R-50 but competitive with both of those earphones in terms of pure technical ability, I’d say they’re quite the steal. Overall, I’d say they’re clearly better than the outgoing RE0 and ZERO and within striking distance, if not on the same level, of the best earphones I’ve heard.
     
    It goes without saying that I like the RE-400 quite a bit. The neutral sound signature might not appeal to everyone and likely won’t be the best fit for more mainstream oriented listeners but those who value tonal accuracy and transparency should give these a look. These face stiff competition from other relatively inexpensive IEMs like the Rock-It Sounds R-50 and VSONIC GR07 (the latter I haven’t heard, just going by impressions I’ve read) but HiFiMan’s combination of low price and high performance should be more than enough to help them compete.
     
    So, yes, I’m positively enamored with the RE-400. It reminds me of my first days of owning the RE0, how they wowed me with sound quality like I’d never before heard. While the RE-400 comes at a time in which I have a great deal of experience with high end earphones, it still had the chops to impress. I guess you could say things have come full circle.
  9. ItsMeHere
    A New Standard
    Written by ItsMeHere
    Published Mar 2, 2013
    4.5/5,
     
    Introduction
     ​
    HiFiMan is a very well regarded Chinese Headphones, Earphones and Portable Players manufacturer that was founded in 2007 by Dr. Fang Bian. Their IEMs line is known to give a very good value for the money; from the RE0 & the RE-ZERO to the RE262 & the RE272, all are known for that. Lately, the company has announced two new models, which are going to replace their whole lineup (which has been discontinued following that announcement). The new models are the $99 MSRP'd RE-400 and the RE-600 (its MSRP is currently unknown, but it should be around $400). The RE-400 has already been released to the market a few weeks ago, while the RE-600 is said to be released around April-May. Like all of HiFiMan's past IEMs, the RE-400 utilizes a dynamic-driver; Titanium coated 8.5mm sized one in this case.​
     
     ​
    Technical Specifications:
    1. Driver: 8.5mm Dynamic-Driver​
    2. Impedance: 32 Ohm +/- 3.2​
    3. Sensitivity: 102dB/1mW​
    4. Frequency Response: 15 – 22 kHz​
    5. Plug Type: 3.5mm Gold-Plated
    6. Cable Length: 1.2m​
      ​
     
    the front of the packaging's first layer
     
    Packaging- the RE-400's packaging consists of two layers; the first one being some kind of a black translucent plastic case, which has the RE-400's main-features written on its front. The left packaging layer is a black-cardboard box;
     
     
    the packaging's rare side
     ​
     
    the RE-400s on the velvet-like surface
     
    the RE-400s are placed on a velvet-like surface on this layer's top, in a presentation that resembles jewelry presentation. On the other side of this velvet-like surface we can find the included accessories. You can watch me unboxing the RE-400s on my new YouTube channel here.
     
     ​
    all of the included accessories
     
    Accessories- you do not get a great amount of accessories with the RE-400s. The included accessories are:
     
    the three kinds of included tips
     ​
    Four pairs of ear-tips- HiFiMan includes four pairs of silicone ear-tips, which I've found to be of a quite good quality and well designed. We get two pairs of medium-sized bi-flanges, a pair of single-flanges and another pair of VERY-large bi-flanges. The single flanges have a silicone-splitter in the middle of their bore, a thing which I don't know the purpose of, but I do have a guess, which is that it might be there in order to put some filters inside the tips (because some companies have already done some similar things in the past).
     
     ​
    the cable winder
     
    Cable Winder- HiFiMan also includes a white silicone-made cable-winder, which you can wrap the earphones' cable around. I've tried to wrap the cable around it, but any time I did so, the cable slipped out of it after a few minutes.
     
     
    the RE-400's cable wrapped around the cable winder
     ​
    The lack of a case is very noticeable, because now, even most of the $50 IEMs are provided with a one, so a $99 one should have a one included too in my opinion. I would've preferred to get a case instead of the not really helpful cable-winder. As for the ear-tips, I'm quite happy with them as they come in three different shapes, which means that fit most-probably won't be a problem.
     
     
    Building Quality & Design- The RE-400's design is focused on the functionality and usability rather than of their look; it is a very low-profile and not-flashy one, and no one is going stare at you when wearing these. The small housings are fully metal-made; their body is chrome/silver colored and their back is covered with a small shiny metal plate, which is scratch prone; this part on both of the earpieces of my RE-400s is already quite scratched. The housings feel solidly-constructed and built with durability in mind.
     
    the housings are vented
     
    They are vented in their bottom side. The nozzles are on the shorter side, but the tips do not stay in your ear, like it happens with many short nozzle'd IEMs.
     
     ​
    the sound-tubes are covered with a fabric filter
     ​
    The sound-tube is covered with a protective fabric-filter, which is rather unusual (because usually, a metal or a plastic piece is used for this purpose), but I've had no problems with it so far. The cable's entry into the housing is protected with a plastic strain-relief, which is on the longer side. It is both tough and flexible in the needed levels, and it seems to protect this weak point quite well. The left and right markings are printed on the strain-reliefs in white "L" & "R" letters.
     
    the cable's two parts
     ​
    Similarly to what was done by T-PEOS in their H-100s (which I've also reviewed, here), also HiFiMan chose to divide the cable into two parts, each part coated with different-materials. The upper part is thinner, and is coated with rubber, while the lower part is thicker and is cloth-coated. That is done in order to make the cable produce less microphonics and also to make it more comfortable for the user, since the part that is close to him is lighter. So far, I haven't experienced any kinks in the cloth-coated part of the cable, a thing which I'm mentioning because some of the cloth-coated cables start to have some annoying kinks in them after a while, and I hope that it's not that case with the RE-400.
     
     
    the model's name on the Y-Split
     ​
     
    HiFiMan's logo on the Y-Split's other side
     ​
    The Y-Split is an about 2 centimeters-long piece of black-plastic. It has HiFiMan's logo printed on one of its sides, while the model's name is printed on the other side, both in white letters. We also have a very low-profile cable-cinch, which is colored in the same silver color as the housings (you can see it in both photos of the Y-Split).
     
     ​
    the 3.5 connector has a large strain-relief
     ​
    The cable ends with a large 3.5mm gold-plated connector, which has a very nice strain-relief. Even though it is big, the connector fits easily my iPod Touch even with a case on, so there is no problem fitting the jack, even if your listening device has a case on it.​
     
    Comfort & Ergonomics- I remember hearing about people that were having some comfort problems with HiFiMan's former RE-262s and RE-272s. It seems that the feedback regarding to the comfort & the fit was taken seriously by the company, since the RE-400s are one of the most comfortable IEMs that I've used till now. Their housings are not only tiny and light, but ergonomically designed too, so comfort isn't a problem with these. Also, I've found the included ear-tips, and especially the Medium-sized bi-flanges to be almost a perfect fit for me. They are different than other bi-flanges, as their two flanges are closer than usual, a thing which I guess that helps with comfort. The small housings make these suitable for deep-insertion, but not as deep as Etymotic's IEMs.
     
     
    the RE-400 worn with the cable down
     ​
    The RE-400s can be worn either with the cable down or over the ear; personally, I wore these over the ear for most of the time, but it's only my personal preference, so you might prefer wearing these with the cable down.
     
    Isolation & Microphonics- the fact that the RE-400 is vented doesn't make its isolation mediocre; actually, I was surprised to find that the RE-400s isolate outside noises quite well. I think that the explanation to this is that the vent is inserted relatively deep into the ear, so it doesn't really enter outside noises into the housings, and also because of the great seal that is achieved when using the included ear-tips. Due to the smart cable design (dividing it to two parts, each with a different coating), there are almost no microphonics present; the rubber-coated cable is almost silent, even when worn straight down.
     
     ​
    the RE-400s worn with the cable over the ear
     ​
    In addition, you can always wear these over the ears, and then, the microphonics are almost fully eliminated.
     
    Sound-Quality- The RE-400s were given about 150 hours of burn-in prior to beginning the critical listening; no changes were noticed after the burn-in period.
     
     ​
    the RE-400 on my iPod
     ​
    The gear that I have used during the reviewing process is my 4th Generation iPod Touch, which is loaded with mostly iTunes Store M4A files and 320 KBPS file. For some of the time I've listened to the RE-400s directly out of my iPod, while I've also tested it with amplification, provided by Firestone Audio's Fireye HD amp, connected to the iPod's dock input through a generic LOD to 3.5mm adapter.
     
     ​
    the RE-400s connected to the Firestone Audio Fireye HD
     ​
    The 8.5mm large Titanium-coated dynamic driver produces a balanced, detailed (but NOT analytical in any way), natural and neutral (with a slight bass-boost) sound-signature, with clarity and cleanness all over the place. I have heard some calling these too "polite" sounding, and even boring, a thing which I could understand in some cases, but it all depends on the sound-signature that you prefer; I do agree that these aren't the most "exciting" sounding IEMs, but I can also tell you that I enjoy listening to these quite a bit honestly. We will now move on to a more detailed description of every one of the sound's parts:
     
    Bass- the RE-400's bass is on the tighter and more accurate side of things, but it is not lacking in amount by any means (though you should not expect these to be some bass monsters, as they're not) and it has a full-body with a nice presence when the track "calls it". The impact is a tad soft in my opinion, and the extension isn't so deep, but both things didn't really bother me when looking at the "full-picture, i.e., the RE-400's other technical abilities serve as a "compensation" to these disadvantages. The bass' speed is just amazing, moreover for the RE-400's $99 price-tag. Its dynamics and punch are quite good too, both which are said to be improvements over HiFiMan's older models such as the RE-0 and the RE-262 (I didn't get to hear these, but such things were mentioned by people that did get to try all of these and have compared them).
     
    Midrange- the mids produced by the RE-400s are just beautiful; they feel so open, airy and natural, while being very clear, transparent and tonally balanced. Detailing is exceptionally good for their price. The details aren't "thrown" at you; they're just there, waiting for the listener to "catch" them. The timbre is done wonderfully, being so realistic and "live"-feeling, so guitars and strings sound really good with the RE-400s. I would've liked the midrange to be a bit more energetic and powerful, but that's my only real complaint about it.
     
    Treble- the treble is nicely integrated with the midrange, both being in each other's line. The highs extend very nicely, and are well detailed in all of their areas, just like the mids. I have detected only a minor amount of sibilance, so there are almost no ear-piercing's' sounds that these produce, which is great. Clarity and cleanness are present in the highs too, giving the sound that kind of special transparency that is also in the RE-400's mids. Sparkle is produced in the right level, causing the cymbals to sound natural and quite real, while not being fatiguing or overly-done.
     
    Sound-Staging and Instrument Separation- the sound-stage isn't as amazing as the sound's other parts. By this, I'm not trying to say that it is bad, as it's not by any means, but rather only decent. It does give the sound a nice sense of space, but I would've liked it to have a bit more depth. On the other hand, instrument separation is a really sweet surprise when looking at the $99 asking price, as the RE-400's performance in this department is comparable to many higher-priced IEMs.
     
    Final Conclusion
     ​
     
    HiFiMan brings a new standard of sound-quality to the below $100 market with the RE-400
     ​
    HiFiMan brings a new standard of sound-quality to the below $100 market with the RE-400. With their sound-quality, I could've easily seen them sold for around $150 or even more. The RE-400s possess a neutral and balanced sound-signature which won't appeal to anyone, as some listeners might find it a bit light on the bass, though I'd say that most of the people that would try them would also like them. I liked the way that they sounded with every genre that I've listened to with them, so I would say that they are quite versatile; I might even call the RE-400 an all-rounder. Offering an ergonomically-designed housing and a great isolation together with an amazing sound-quality makes the RE-400 "a full package". For only $99 I couldn't recommend these more!
     
    [​IMG]
     
    Where to Buy? The HiFiMan RE-400's MSRP is $99. It can be purchased for that price directly from HiFiMan's web-store, here. The RE-400s are said to start shipping to HiFiMan's dealers all over the world soon, so check out if your local dealer will have them in stock.
     
    I'd like to thank Peter for the review sample.
     
    This review was reposted from my audio reviews & news website "It's A Headphones Thing". Check it out for some more IEMs and Headphones reviews, here. http://iahpt.wordpress.com/
    1. View previous replies...
    2. ItsMeHere
      Sorry, I never heard any of HiFiMAN's previous products, so I can't answer this question.
      ItsMeHere, Mar 4, 2013
    3. Lifted Andreas
      How are these with electronic music, namely Trance? I'm looking for a replacement for my old EPH-100 and thought I should try something new and different...
      Lifted Andreas, Dec 11, 2013
    4. Lifted Andreas
      How are these with electronic music, namely Trance? I'm looking for a replacement for my old EPH-100 and thought I should try something new and different...
      Lifted Andreas, Dec 11, 2013
  10. project86
    Best $99 IEM ever!
    Written by project86
    Published Feb 1, 2013
    4.5/5,
    Pros - Exceptional tonal balance and clarity, not boring or overly bright, build quality, comfort
    Cons - Sound is not for the bassheads, cable feels a bit delicate but it's probably nothing to worry about
     

     
     
     
    HiFiMAN needs no introduction around here, so I'll simply share my opinion briefly. In my mind, not only are they one of the premier manufacturers of headphones and related gear, but - and this is possibly more important - they deserve a lot of credit for helping advance the headphone industry in general. Of course, they aren't alone in this category. Plenty of others have done amazing things over the last few years. But I can't think of anyone who even approaches the broad portfolio of HiFiMAN. They have gear competing for best-in-class in a variety of categories - their HE series of planar magnetic headphones, their RE series of IEMs, their EF series desktop amps, their HM series of portable players... all that remains is a dedicated DAC or two to completely cover the full range of HeadFi hear. 
     
    I've reviewed the HE-400 headphones and loved them. I also use the HE-500 and those are great too. But this is my first time actually having a HiFiMAN IEM of my own. I've heard some of the older models like the classic RE-0 and RE-ZERO, as well as the more recent RE-262, but never got to know them well enough to really form a solid opinion other than "they seem good". HiFiMAN contacted me and asked if I'd like to review their newRE-400 Waterline IEM ($99). Since I write for InnerFidelity as well and have plenty of reviews on deck, I wasn't sure if I would have time for this one. But I decided to work it in and boy am I glad I did. 
     
    DESIGN
    Like all the prior RE models, RE-400 uses a dynamic driver. In this case HiFiMAN uses an advanced 8.5mm unit with a titanium driver. Impedance is rated at 32 ohm, sensitivity 102dB/1mW, max power 30mW. So don't try running this on HiFiMAN's powerful EF6 amp as it probably won't be ideal....
     
    The cable is made from OFC copper and has a cloth sleeve leading from the 3.5mm, semi-angled plug to the Y split. From there it uses a soft rubber material leading to the earpieces themselves. I speculate this section was left "unsleeved" to minimize microphonics. It feels kind of flimsy but also strong at the same time and very flexible which is a good thing. Having been in the IEM game for a few years now, I'm sure HiFiMAN knows what they are doing with respect to making sure cables are appropriately durable. Bonus points are awarded for the slider which appears to match the silver shells of the IEMs. 
     
    The IEM body itself is made from a metallic substance (aluminum?) and feels durable yet lightweight. There's a very small port on the bottom of each earpiece which is fairly common for dynamic based designs. Isolation doesn't seem to suffer - while these are no Etymotic ER4s, they do have moderate isolation as could be expected from a design like this that seems designed for medium insertion. I can get them to go in rather deep if forced but the sound gets worse - I don't think they were intended to be used in that way. 
     
    Looking at the pictures, or even seeing them in person, these don't seem like tiny IEMs. The Ultimate Ears UE700 or the Jays Q-jays are the two smallest models I can think of, and the RE-400 doesn't strike me as being in the same category with regards to size. Even so, it's definitely on the small side, and real life shows them to be smaller than I had expected. Even with medium insertion the shell nearly disappears into my ear and is hardly visible from the outside. This makes the RE-400 one of the few IEMs to be suitable for listening while laying down. 
     
    The RE-400 comes with a rather nice assortment of tips - think quality over quantity. I got good results with the typical medium sized single flange tip. But I got even better results from the medium biflange tips. I don't normally get along very well when it comes to dual or triple flange tips so I was surprised at this. These tips have each "layer" closer together than most biflages, and the insertion is barely deeper than the basic single flange tip, so perhaps that's why it works so well for me. 
     

     
     

     

     
    GEAR
    I listened to the RE-400 on a variety of equipment including:
     
    Sansa Clip+
    Meizu MX 4-Core
    iHiFi 960
    HiFi E.T. MA9
     
    I also used my big home setup based around an Auraliti PK90 player and a Resonessence Labs Invicta DAC/amp. The RE-400 hits the "sweet spot" of usability - it doesn't sound terrible on a basic player, but does scale reasonably well as your source and amplification improves. I appreciate this as some of my IEMs sound miserable on a basic DAP, and others top off too quickly. The RE-400 seems to have something for everyone. 
     

     

     

     
    LISTENING
    The first thing that struck me about the RE-400 was the clarity. It's got a very clean, accurate presentation which defies any attempt to stereotype IEMs based on a "dynamic driver sound". If I believed the stereotypes, I would probably think this was an armature design but that just isn't the case. If you think all dynamic IEMs have thumping bass and somewhat slow or muffled highs, you obviously haven't heard enough of them to know better (and specifically, you haven't heard anything in the RE-series).
     
    The overall sound falls slightly onto the analytical side. It doesn't go as far as something like an Etymotic, but it does tend towards neutrality and precision rather than relaxed fun. Bass doesn't thunder but what's there is tight and accurate. I find that most of the time it is plenty satisfying for me - any type of rock or jazz, or practically any music using real drums, sounds very nice. Only when trying some hip-hop and electronic music where exaggerated bass is the focus, does the RE-400 seem occasionally lacking. What's there is great - there just sometimes isn't enough of it to rattle your ears in the way you might want. Again, this is a tuning choice rather than a deficiency, and the RE-400 joins the Sennheiser HD800, AKG K701, and many other models with deliberately non-bass-heavy sound signatures. But I don't want to make it sound too bass light - the RE-400 is plenty satisfying for me in all but a few cases. 
     
    Mids on the RE-400 are really the star of the whole show. Open, clear, and very transparent, they carry the listener further into the music than any $99 headphone has a right to. Vocals sound clear and lifelike. Snare drums have appropriate snap. Everything sounds "real" for lack of a better word. It's quite intoxicating, and forces me to cast an accusatory glace at some of my other (more expensive) IEMs like the $399 Westone AC2. The AC2 has some great bass but could definitely learn a thing or two from the RE-400 in terms of midrange transparency. 
     
    Because of this excellent midrange, the RE-400 works well with "audiophile" grade recordings. I had a great time listening to Marta Gomez - Cantos De Agua Dulce, Livingston Taylor - Ink, Oscar Peterson Trio - Night Train, and a boatload of classical works from a variety of labels. I even tried some DSD tracks through my Resonessence Labs Invicta and they sounded stunning. I can't think of a better $99 headphone or IEM with which to listen to great recordings. 
     
    The top end of the RE-400 is extended and clear, but not overly sparkly. For some people this will be very welcome - hot treble is something that really bothers certain people, and can kill an otherwise great listening experience. The RE-400 is nicely balanced - fairly clean and extended without being harsh or overly emphasized. The downside is that some people might find it a little boring. I personally don't hear it this way but I can see how someone else might. If your preference is geared towards the super-exciting, you may find the RE-400 a tad bland. 
     
    The good part about the highs being the way they are - this is not a completely unforgiving IEM. Sure, it sounds better with quality equipment and recordings. But it rarely becomes completely unlistenable. That's not the case with some of my high-end custom IEMs which practically demand a good source. I recently listened to a flagship custom (which shall remain nameless) on a Sansa Fuze - playing Mastodon's Crack The Skye, I could only handle a few tracks before I had to turn it off. It just sounded like a blurry, harsh mess. I'm very familiar with that album on my home setup and while it isn't exactly a Steve Hoffman masterpiece, it normally sounds far less strained. So I switched to the RE-400 and bingo! I could actually enjoy the music once more. There's a headline in there somewhere: "Extra! Extra! HiFiMAN RE-400 superior to $1,000+ 6 driver CIEM! Read all about it!" This is deceiving of course, because switch to a better source and that flagship custom completely dominates the RE-400 - as it should for the price. But what I'm getting at is this: the RE-400 is not overly analytical and actually does a great job with average quality sources. 
     

     

     

     
     
    CONCLUSION
    I'll keep this fairly simple - the RE-400 is not a massive deviation from the earlier RE-series models. I'd call it more of an evolution than a revolution. It hasn't turned into a bass monster, nor has it gone completely ER-4S all over the place. Still, in some ways it does seem to have developed a more "universal" sound. I suspect the even response and clean sound will work for more people, though a few who previously loved the RE-0 might find RE-400 too homogenized for their taste.
     
    As far as I'm concerned, the RE-400 is about as good as it gets for $99, and then some. That includes IEMs and full sized headphones too. I can think of nothing else in the price range that has such smooth, transparent sound, and still remains engaging. Add in the quality build, excellent fit, and well-proven history of customer support, and it seems like an easy recommendation. HiFiMAN does it again!
      money4me247 likes this.
    1. View previous replies...
    2. Sweden
      I have not found anything sounding close to as good as the JVC FXD70 under 100$. The GR06 with special EQ maybe.
      Hope to try this one out and see how it compares.
      Sweden, Feb 1, 2013
    3. Sweden
      Fantastic review btw :)
      Sweden, Feb 1, 2013
    4. flognarde
      Nice review. When I hear "not for bassheads" I know we are on the right path ...
      flognarde, Jul 7, 2016